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BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | May 11, 1994
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks advanced yesterday, ending a two-day slide, as U.S. government bonds, overseas stock markets and the dollar all rallied.Bonds and the dollar gained as Germany lowered a key money market interest rate and a sale of $17 billion of three-year TC Treasury notes drew strong demand."
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NEWS
October 9, 2013
The latest out of the extreme conservative wing of the Republican party is that a failure of the U.S. government to take the steps necessary to pay all its bills on time would be no biggie. They say we could juggle things around and avoid missing any payments on the debt, which they figure is the only thing our creditors really care about. Some, such as Sen. Rand Paul, go a step further and say failure to raise the government's borrowing limit might be a blessing: "If you don't raise the debt limit," he told the New York Times, "all you're saying is, 'We're going to be balancing the budget.'" Um, no. What you're saying is that the federal government is going to start picking and choosing which bills to pay. Depending on the vagaries of cash flow, maybe today the military doesn't get paid, maybe tomorrow Social Security checks don't go out, or maybe Medicare can't cover its bills.
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NEWS
By Michael Kinsley | February 13, 2005
HERE IS another proof that President Bush's designs for Social Security cannot work. I first heard it from the actor and liberal activist Rob Reiner. Like the argument I have been hawking, this one doesn't merely suggest that Mr. Bush is making bad policy. It demonstrates with near-mathematical certainty that the idea he endorses cannot work. Period. The Meathead Proposition (in honor of Mr. Reiner's most famous role) is this: The case that there is a Social Security crisis and the proposal to address it through "personal retirement accounts" both depend on assumptions about the course of the economy over the next few decades.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | December 8, 2011
European leaders are working feverishly to create what German Chancellor Angela Merkel is calling a "fiscal union" to restore private investor confidence in Europe and rekindle growth. Unfortunately, what she advocates will thrust Europe into a deeper economic crisis and leave European leaders without the fiscal and monetary policy tools necessary to combat recessions. The reforms Chancellor Merkel is pushing - hard caps on national government deficits - would ensure the ultimate demise of the euro, years of economic stagnation or worse.
NEWS
June 1, 1998
RUSSIAN President Boris N. Yeltsin has temporarily stopped the ruble's free fall, but even a generous bailout from the West won't be sufficient to maintain the Russian currency for long. Unless the government begins to balance its budget and starts collecting taxes, no amount of external shoring up will prevent the ruble's devaluation.The Russian government has been financing its operations by selling bonds. Creditors have grown wary that the government does not have the resources to pay the interest or the principal on the bonds.
NEWS
By MICHAEL KINSLEY | February 24, 2006
The hideous complexity of President Bush's prescription drug program has reduced elderly Americans - and their children - to tears of bewildered frustration. The multiple options when you sign up, each with its own multiple ceilings and copayments; the second round of red tape when you want to acquire some pills; the ludicrously complex and arbitrary standards of eligibility, which play a cruel and pointless game of hide-and-seek as they lurch up and down the graph paper like drunks. Mr. Bush's only major domestic accomplishment in six years as president has not achieved its intended purpose of cementing the affection of senior citizens for the Republican Party.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | December 29, 1994
Following the dollar and bonds downhill, Wall Street snapped its four-day winning streak yesterday. As 30-year government bonds fell almost one full point, the Dow Jones industrial average declined 22.20 points to close at 3,839.49. The Mexican peso stabilized, recovering about 10 percent after its recent dive.HOLIDAY HASH: Under "After the Nov. 8 Election: What's In," Business Week, Dec. 26, lists in its financial category: Two-year Treasury notes, certified public accountants, tax cuts and IRAs.
BUSINESS
By WERNER RENBERG and WERNER RENBERG,1991, Werner Renberg | May 12, 1991
If the slide in interest rates still has you wondering where t go for higher yields, and you find "junk bond" funds unsuitable, you may want to take a look at world income funds.Such funds, which invest solely or primarily in higher-yielding foreign government bonds, involve the same risks that domestic bond funds do. There's a credit risk: the risk that issuers of the bonds won't pay interest or principal on time. And there's a market risk: the risk that the bonds' prices will fall when interest rates rise.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1993
U.S. launches bonds probeThe Justice Department has started an investigation of the government securities market, hunting for evidence of possible collusion among large bond dealers, officials said.The inquiry is the latest in a series of government probles into trading practices in the multitrillion dollar market for government bonds, notes and bills, and stems directly from the Treasury auction cheating scandal that ensnared Salomon Inc. in 1991. Department officials acknowledged the probe yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | May 21, 1992
Every May, when I was little, Mother would go through an annual ritual in our Pikesville home called "spring cleaning."Grim-faced and determined, she compulsively emptied and dusted the kitchen closets, scrubbed the dishes, took down the heavy winter drapes, "slip-covered" the couch and chairs for summer, beat the dirt from the carpets and hung out all of my heavy wool suits and coats to air. ("Son, have you bathed recently?")Recalling that ancient rite of spring, Ticker presents, 65 years later, a 1992 spring checkup -- this one for your money:(1)
NEWS
By MICHAEL KINSLEY | February 24, 2006
The hideous complexity of President Bush's prescription drug program has reduced elderly Americans - and their children - to tears of bewildered frustration. The multiple options when you sign up, each with its own multiple ceilings and copayments; the second round of red tape when you want to acquire some pills; the ludicrously complex and arbitrary standards of eligibility, which play a cruel and pointless game of hide-and-seek as they lurch up and down the graph paper like drunks. Mr. Bush's only major domestic accomplishment in six years as president has not achieved its intended purpose of cementing the affection of senior citizens for the Republican Party.
TOPIC
By Larry Williams and Larry Williams,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | June 26, 2005
At the end of the 19th century, Great Britain, then the world's dominant political and economic power, made money investing in the fast-growing economy of upstart America on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean. A few decades later, the British came gradually to recognize, painfully, that the upstart had become the leader - that Wall Street had supplanted London as the world's financial capital and that America's industrial might was supreme. Now, some are beginning to wonder whether another such realization might be over the horizon formed by another ocean - the Pacific.
NEWS
By Michael Kinsley | February 13, 2005
HERE IS another proof that President Bush's designs for Social Security cannot work. I first heard it from the actor and liberal activist Rob Reiner. Like the argument I have been hawking, this one doesn't merely suggest that Mr. Bush is making bad policy. It demonstrates with near-mathematical certainty that the idea he endorses cannot work. Period. The Meathead Proposition (in honor of Mr. Reiner's most famous role) is this: The case that there is a Social Security crisis and the proposal to address it through "personal retirement accounts" both depend on assumptions about the course of the economy over the next few decades.
NEWS
January 26, 2005
Less-risky paths can preserve Social Security How tragic it is that Thomas Sowell feels Social Security should be changed to avoid liberals "spending your money as they see fit and keep[ing] you dependent on them" ("Privatization offers best chance to get out what you pay in," Opinion * Commentary, Jan. 20). Encouraging Americans to believe that Social Security will not be able to pay its promised benefits, or that we are better off trusting Wall Street instead of our government, is not only deceptive, it's dishonorable.
NEWS
January 15, 2005
Need to reform Social Security is a no-brainer The Sun's editorial "America's security net" (Jan. 9) correctly notes that lower-income workers get proportionately larger Social Security benefits than higher-income workers, but neglects to mention that these same low-income earners have most if not all of their contributions refunded to them through the earned income credit. Yet The Sun suggests that those who get the lowest return on their contributions -- the higher-income earners -- should pay even more by lifting the cap on earnings subject to the FICA tax. And further, that many of these high-income earners should see either a reduction or elimination of their benefits.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2001
Trading in government bonds will resume today, but major U.S. stock markets will remain closed, giving trading firms at least one more day to deal with the tragedy that struck the World Trade Center before opening for business no later than Monday, Richard Grasso, chairman of the New York Stock Exchange, said yesterday. Executives of the NYSE, the Nasdaq stock market and the Securities and Exchange Commission announced the decision late yesterday after meeting to discuss issues surrounding the resumption of trading, including the soundness of Wall Street structures near the site of Tuesday's terrorist attacks and firms' operational readiness.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 17, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In an effort to get Americans to save more, the Treasury announced plans yesterday to issue a new type of government bond that would protect average investors from inflation as well as help the government finance the national debt.The new bonds would offer returns that would rise and fall in line with inflation -- a feature that the Treasury said should make Americans more willing to buy government bonds to pay for their retirement or their children's education.The bonds would be backed by the government and priced so that unexpected increases in inflation would not erode their value.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | June 11, 1995
NEW YORK -- Looking for reasons to think the bond market rally isn't over?Here's one: Some traditional buyers of bonds in previous rallies haven't joined this one yet -- mutual fund investors. History shows that bond market rallies usually don't end until people pour money into bond funds.Edward S. Hyman, president of ISI Group Inc., a New York money management and economic consulting firm, published a report this month studying the relationship between bond yields and bond fund sales since 1984.
NEWS
June 1, 1998
RUSSIAN President Boris N. Yeltsin has temporarily stopped the ruble's free fall, but even a generous bailout from the West won't be sufficient to maintain the Russian currency for long. Unless the government begins to balance its budget and starts collecting taxes, no amount of external shoring up will prevent the ruble's devaluation.The Russian government has been financing its operations by selling bonds. Creditors have grown wary that the government does not have the resources to pay the interest or the principal on the bonds.
BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1997
Diverting billions of dollars a year of Social Security savings into stocks would probably nudge up prices and calm Wall Street's gyrations, but the ultimate impact depends on how -- and how much -- money ends up in the market."
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