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February 12, 2004
WASHINGTON - Rend al-Rahim Francke, an Iraqi-American and Washington representative for the Iraqi Governing Council, is well known in the capital as a low-key but passionate advocate for democracy in her homeland. Born in Baghdad, she left Iraq in the 1970s and earned degrees at Cambridge University and the Sorbonne. As founder and executive director of the Iraq Foundation, a research organization, she stayed outside the factional disputes of Iraqi opposition figures. She was interviewed recently by Mark Matthews of The Sun's Washington bureau.
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NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | March 29, 2005
PHILADELPHIA - As the democracy debate intensifies in the Middle East, many Arab women are asking whether democratic elections mean that their freedom will be curtailed. If this concern seems strange, consider Salama al-Khafaji, a courageous dental surgeon who risked her life to run in Iraqi elections. Her 17-year-old son was shot dead in 2003 during an attempt by insurgents to kill her, but she continued her work as a member of Iraq's first interim governing council. A motorcyclist toting a machine gun nearly assassinated her during the election run-up in January.
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NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 10, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The U.S.-led occupation of Iraq sustained hits on its military and civilian flanks yesterday when 62 Americans were injured in three attacks and the Iraqi Governing Council defiantly announced the firing of a governor chosen by U.S. administrator L. Paul Bremer III. Two suicide bombings targeted U.S. military facilities, the first before dawn outside a compound in Tall Afar, near the northern city of Mosul, injuring 59 soldiers. The second occurred at a base in Husseiniya, 15 miles northeast of Baghdad, where a man blew himself up, wounding at least three soldiers.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 13, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Gunmen shot and fatally wounded a deputy foreign minister as he drove to work yesterday morning. It was the first killing of a senior Iraqi official since the announcement of the interim government on June 1. The official, Bassam Salih Kubba, 60, was shot in the stomach near a mosque in the northwest Baghdad neighborhood of Azimiya, a Sunni-dominated area that is hostile to the occupation. He was taken to a nearby hospital and died there, according to a Foreign Ministry statement.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 2, 2004
WASHINGTON - Iraqi officials and a United Nations envoy appointed the members of a new interim Iraqi government yesterday, including the head of one of the largest Sunni Muslim tribes for the ceremonial post of president and members of the Shiite and Kurdish communities as the country's two vice presidents. In a surprise move, the Iraqi Governing Council, hand-picked last year by the United States, then declared that it was disbanding to give the new leadership the leverage to negotiate immediately with U.S. diplomats, the United Nations and military commanders over efforts to stabilize the country.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Monte Morin and Edmund Sanders and Monte Morin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 21, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Iraqi police backed by U.S. troops stormed the home and offices of one-time U.S. ally Ahmed Chalabi, rousting him from sleep, tearing his portrait from the wall and carting away computers, documents, weapons and other potential evidence in a criminal investigation. U.S. officials said yesterday that Chalabi, a member of the U.S.-backed Iraqi Governing Council, was not a target of the probe, but they are searching for up to 15 people linked to his U.S.-funded party, the Iraqi National Congress (INC)
NEWS
By Liz Sly and Liz Sly,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 29, 2004
BAGHDAD - Iyad Allawi, a pro-American secular Shiite leader who spent nearly 30 years in exile in London, was picked yesterday to be prime minister of Iraq's interim government. Allawi, a former member of the Baath Party who fell out with Saddam Hussein in 1976 and formed an opposition movement called the Iraqi National Accord, was selected at a meeting of Iraq's U.S.-appointed Governing Council. The chief U.S. administrator in Iraq, L. Paul Bremer III, turned up at the end of the closed-door council session and shook Allawi's hand, affirming the selection of the first of five fiercely contested top positions in the new interim government.
NEWS
By Evan Osnos and Tom Hundley and Evan Osnos and Tom Hundley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 1, 2004
MOSUL, Iraq - A car bomb ripped through a police station in this northern Iraqi city yesterday, killing at least nine people and wounding 48, and an attack on a U.S. convoy near Kirkuk killed three American soldiers. The car bomb threw severed body parts across four lanes of traffic. Wounded Iraqi officers stumbled down the block after the attack on the police station, leaving a trail of bloody footprints to a small pediatric hospital that was rapidly overwhelmed by the wounded. The blast appeared timed for the moment when the busy police station was sure to be fullest: payday on the eve of the four-day Eid al-Adha feast.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Laura King and Carol J. Williams and Laura King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 18, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Iraq's interim leaders appealed yesterday for those waging a campaign of insurgency against the U.S.-led occupation to cease provocations and take advantage of "a spirit of forgiveness" that will allow them to reconcile with their Iraqi brothers. The Iraqi Governing Council held out an olive branch to those it said had been deceived by deposed dictator Saddam Hussein, calling on them to "desist from acts of violence and return to the fold of the Iraqi people." Meanwhile, officers of the Army's 1st Armored Division determined that a pre-dawn truck explosion that killed 12 people was probably an accident and not an act of terrorism.
NEWS
By Paul West and Tom Bowman and Paul West and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 28, 2003
WASHINGTON - President Bush paid a lightning visit to U.S. troops near Baghdad yesterday and assured the people of Iraq that the United States would stay in their country "until the job is done." On a surprise Thanksgiving Day trip cloaked in secrecy, Bush met briefly with four members of the Iraqi Governing Council, and with Baghdad municipal officials and U.S. commanders. But the centerpiece of Bush's 2 1/2 -hour visit was a pep talk to American troops, who greeted their unexpected visitor with astonished whoops.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 2, 2004
WASHINGTON - All through the chaotic aftermath of President Bush's invasion of Iraq, he has been credited by supporters with "staying the course" - demonstrating his firmness by not wavering in his pursuit of a democratic Iraqi state. While it is true that he has said consistently that there will be an American presence in Iraq until that objective is ensured, the means of achieving it have fluctuated repeatedly. His performance in dealing with occupied Iraq has been a series of switches and retreats in his rationales for the war and in his administration's seat-of-the-pants decisions to find its way out of the morass created by his own hand, and/or those of his advisers.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 2, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- By all appearances, Sheik Ghazi Mashal Ajil Al-Yawer seems well suited to the presidency of the interim Iraqi government, a largely ceremonial post. His robust figure, flowing white robes and rimless eyeglasses -- together with a well-groomed mustache -- give him a regal air. But from statements he has made while on the Iraqi Governing Council and the influence he wields through his tribal position, Yawer does not appear to be the sort to content himself with presiding over parades and welcoming visiting dignitaries.
NEWS
By Monte Morin and Said Rifai and Monte Morin and Said Rifai,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 2, 2004
BAGHDAD - While U.S. officials hailed appointments to an Iraqi interim government yesterday, a small sampling of Baghdad residents found little interest among them in the pedigrees and parties of the new leaders and Cabinet. What interested them most, they said, was bringing an end to the country's violence, crime, power shortages and joblessness. The new government, which will be in place until elections next year, also includes a prime minister, Iyad Allawi, who will have greater day-to-day authority than Ghazi Mashal Ajil al-Yawer, the tribal chief who was named interim president yesterday; two vice presidents, and 33 Cabinet members.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 2, 2004
WASHINGTON - Iraqi officials and a United Nations envoy appointed the members of a new interim Iraqi government yesterday, including the head of one of the largest Sunni Muslim tribes for the ceremonial post of president and members of the Shiite and Kurdish communities as the country's two vice presidents. In a surprise move, the Iraqi Governing Council, hand-picked last year by the United States, then declared that it was disbanding to give the new leadership the leverage to negotiate immediately with U.S. diplomats, the United Nations and military commanders over efforts to stabilize the country.
NEWS
By Liz Sly and Bill Glauber and Liz Sly and Bill Glauber,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 1, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The rift between Iraq's Governing Council and the United States over the nomination of the president widened yesterday, with council members accusing the chief U.S. administrator of trying to railroad them into accepting America's choice for the post. Members of the U.S.-appointed Governing Council were to meet yesterday to make a final list of candidates for the government that will run Iraq after the United States restores limited sovereignty June 30. But when they arrived at the U.S. administration headquarters, they said, they were greeted by a message from administrator L. Paul Bremer III that the meeting was postponed.
NEWS
By Liz Sly and Liz Sly,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 29, 2004
BAGHDAD - Iyad Allawi, a pro-American secular Shiite leader who spent nearly 30 years in exile in London, was picked yesterday to be prime minister of Iraq's interim government. Allawi, a former member of the Baath Party who fell out with Saddam Hussein in 1976 and formed an opposition movement called the Iraqi National Accord, was selected at a meeting of Iraq's U.S.-appointed Governing Council. The chief U.S. administrator in Iraq, L. Paul Bremer III, turned up at the end of the closed-door council session and shook Allawi's hand, affirming the selection of the first of five fiercely contested top positions in the new interim government.
NEWS
By Aamer Madhani and Aamer Madhani,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 8, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Iraqi Governing Council members signaled yesterday that they were ready to sign the interim constitution as early as today. Those council members who balked at signing the transitional constitution last week said they would sign the document. The planned signing was delayed at the last minute Friday after at least five Shiite members said they would not sign the constitution before consulting further with Shiite leaders. The holdouts were told by Ayatollah Ali al Husseini al-Sistani that the constitution gave too much power to the Kurdish and Sunni minorities.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 4, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Iraqi census officials devised a detailed plan to count the country's entire population next summer and prepare a voter roll that would open the way to national elections in September. But American officials say they rejected the idea, and Iraqi Governing Council members say they never saw the plan. The practicality of national elections is the subject of intense debate among Iraqi and American officials, who are trying to move forward on a plan to give Iraqis sovereignty next summer.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Monte Morin and Edmund Sanders and Monte Morin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 21, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Iraqi police backed by U.S. troops stormed the home and offices of one-time U.S. ally Ahmed Chalabi, rousting him from sleep, tearing his portrait from the wall and carting away computers, documents, weapons and other potential evidence in a criminal investigation. U.S. officials said yesterday that Chalabi, a member of the U.S.-backed Iraqi Governing Council, was not a target of the probe, but they are searching for up to 15 people linked to his U.S.-funded party, the Iraqi National Congress (INC)
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 18, 2004
WASHINGTON - The car-bomb assassination of Iraq's highest-ranking civilian leader in Baghdad early yesterday appeared to make the prospect of a smooth transfer of political power from U.S. occupation authorities even more fragile and the risks of more violence even higher. American officials insisted the June 30 handover would occur as scheduled even as they condemned the killing of Izzadine Saleem, a moderate Shiite who held the rotating presidency of the Iraqi Governing Council this month.
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