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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
More than 44,000 gallons of sewage spilled near Goucher College in Towson before crews stopped the overflow Monday, Baltimore County public works officials say. Public works officials received a report of sewage odors in the area Aug. 5, and crews tracked the source to a grassy area northwest of the Dulaney Valley and Southerly roads intersection. A root blocking a sewer pipe had caused the overflow, and was cleared Monday afternoon, officials said. The sewage flowed into a grassy area east of Dulaney Valley Road and into Long Quarter Branch.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 8, 2014
An overwhelming majority of Marylanders are worried about pollution in the Chesapeake Bay, a new poll finds, and most are concerned enough about the bay's slumping crabs to back a moratorium on crabbing. The survey by Goucher College found 84 percent of those contacted last week said they were very or somewhat concerned about bay pollution. Just 14 percent said it worried them little or not at all. The 708 Marylanders interviewed by telephone were only a little more upbeat about the overall health of the state's environment - 62 percent rated it fair to poor, while 36 percent consider it good to excellent.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2013
Sanford J. Ungar, the president of Goucher College, plans to resign next summer after 13 years at the head of the Towson school, according to a letter circulated to faculty, staff and students Friday. The letter, addressed to board of trustees chairwoman Norma Lynn Fox, offered no reason for Ungar's decision but noted the "many political, financial, and curricular challenges" liberal arts colleges are facing. "I believe Goucher is well-positioned to deal with these issues, but I also feel it is time for the college to seek a new leader who can bring his or her own experience and perspective to bear and move this remarkable institution forward," Ungar wrote.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
In the spring of 1981, when Marion Rodgers was a senior at Goucher College, she nearly fell on top of a box of old papers that would change her life. Rodgers was preparing an article for the student newspaper paper on a former author and Goucher professor named Sara Haardt - who later married the iconoclastic journalist H.L. Mencken. "I was putting away one of her scrapbooks in the vault of the library's rare book room when I literally stumbled over a box that was lying on the floor next to a shelf," said Rodgers, now a resident of Washington, D.C. "Taped on the top of the box was a message that basically said, 'Do not open until 1981.
NEWS
December 9, 2006
Goucher College has named its first provost, Marc M. Roy of Coe College in Iowa, in a process that drew more than 100 applications, school officials said in a statement released yesterday. Roy, expected to begin the job in June, also will serve as Goucher's chief academic officer. He is Coe College's vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty. As Goucher's provost, Roy will be the school's second-highest ranking administrator and will direct its academic program. In selecting its first provost, the college convened a committee made up of faculty, students, staff and trustees.
EXPLORE
January 17, 2012
On Thursday, Jan.19, Gettysburg College Symphony Orchestra will visit both Towson High School and Dulaney High School to conduct a clinic and concert with each school. The visit and clinics were arranged by former Dulaney High student Elizabeth Amrhein, a graduate of the Class of 2008. Amrhein, a bassoonist with the Gettysburg College Symphony Orchestra, is a member of Gettyburg's Class of 2012. Another Dulaney graduate, Connelly Doan, is also a member of the Gettysburg orchestra, performing as a percussionist.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2004
Thomas Jackson Turner, a Goucher College student who was an outstanding athlete, took his life Monday on the school's campus in Towson. He was 19. "Tom was the all-around, all-American college kid," said Goucher President Sanford J. Ungar. "He had many friends from all different parts of the campus. He was everybody's friend. He had an impact on an awful lot of people here at Goucher. He was a very sensitive young man, and we're all just stunned by this." Mr. Turner was born in Denver and raised in Los Osos, Calif.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Staff Writer | October 22, 1994
Basking in warm waves of applause from the students, faculty and alumni of her new campus, Judy Jolley Mohraz was inaugurated as the ninth president of Goucher College yesterday afternoon.The indoor ceremony, attended by nearly 900 people, formally invested Dr. Mohraz with the powers of president, although she took office July 1.Accompanied by the august sounds of a six-piece brass ensemble playing classical processionals, representatives of nearly 100 colleges and of Goucher's faculty walked into Kraushaar Auditorium in full academic regalia.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | October 25, 1990
Neal Gallico and James Sherwood don't dip their toes into the same bodies of water. Sharing an exhibition at Goucher College, they seem only to have watery settings in common.When painter Gallico goes to the beach, he sees how the ocean, sand and sunbathing women all seem to merge in one bright vision. When photographer Sherwood goes to the pool, he sees how the masses of humanity congregate.The semi-tropical fervor of Gallico's paintings comes through even before one learns the title of this series, "Southern Light."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | November 6, 1991
In an artist's statement accompanying his "Passing Time" exhibit at Goucher College, Ed Worteck says he got the idea for the show from H. L. Mencken. The Baltimore journalist had once described the rail route from here to New York as, in Worteck's paraphrase, "the most Godforsaken and depressing route in all of America."A photographer who heads Goucher's art department, Worteck has lived or worked near railroads much of his life, and the shots he's taken during the last two years along the New York-Washington route bear Mencken out. There is certainly ample ugliness here -- rotting cars, dilapidated buildings, cityscapes marred by billboards and power lines, back yards that look like dumps.
NEWS
Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
The $31 million donation to the University of Maryland, College Park on Friday from a computer tech millionaire was the largest donation in the history of the university, but there have been others nearly as big. The university has received three $30 million gifts from three individuals in recent years: Robert E. Fischell, a physicist and inventor, gave money to establish the department of bioengineering; A. James Clark, a construction company owner,...
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Baltimore County Police reported a crash in Towson at Goucher College Drive and Locustvale Road at 8:58 a.m. on Monday. Northbound Dulaney Valley Road is shut down at Fairmont Avenue, police said. The state Department of Transportation reported a disabled vehicle on Interstate 83 South at the Edmondson Avenue exit at 9:03 a.m. No additional information was given. The Maryland Transportation Authority said that this week's Star-Spangled Spectacular, slated for the Baltimore Harbor and Fort McHenry on Sept.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
If your grades and SAT scores are less than stellar, you still have a shot at getting into Goucher College with a two-minute video. Starting with applicants for next year's class, Goucher announced Thursday that it will give students the option of submitting a video they record in lieu of transcripts or college admission exams. Officials say the move is designed to help those who might have difficulty navigating the complexity of the college application process. Though colleges across the country have allowed students to submit videos as a supplement to their application, Goucher officials believe the college will be the first to judge applicants primarily on the video.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2014
When saying goodbye, weeping can come with the territory. In its own way, the party-starting Baltimore rap duo AK Slaughter knows this painfully well. At a recent cover shoot for their forthcoming and final EP, “It's Not You ... It's Us,” Emily Slaughter and Aran Keating hoped to depict the aftermath of a break-up. They wanted to truly cry for the full effect, but an onion they sliced failed to produce tears. So the two friends improvised. “So then Aran takes the onion juice and puts it against his eyeball,” Slaughter, who described the shoot as “exhausting,” said outside of the Bell Foundry performance space in Station North last week.
NEWS
July 17, 2014
In disputing Vincent DeMarco's letter ( "Tougher gun laws are helping reduce homicides in Baltimore," July 5) about the positive impact of Maryland's Firearms Safety Act of 2013 in reducing gun violence, Michael Peterson ( "Gun control isn't the reason for declining Baltimore homicides," July 11) ignores the data Mr. DeMarco included in his letter from Professor Daniel Webster of the Johns Hopkins Center For Gun Policy and Research showing that other states that have enacted fingerprint licensing of handgun purchasers tend to have lower gun death rates than similar states.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
Mary Elizabeth Dyer Corrin, a code-breaker during World War II and former teacher at two Towson-area elementary schools, died June 30 of lung cancer at the Blakehurst retirement community. She was 92. The daughter of Navy Vice Adm. George C. Dyer, Mrs. Corrin was born in Manila in the Philippines; by the time she graduated from high school, she told her family later, she had attended 22 different schools. While her family was stationed in Hawaii, Mrs. Corrin traveled by boat and train to attend Smith College in Massachusetts, where she majored in math.
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,Contributing Writer | October 25, 1993
The Washington Ballet packed Goucher College's Kraushaar Auditorium Saturday night with fans hungry for ballet. Artistic director and founder Mary Day satisfied everybody with her company's first-rate , dancing and with a program of three solid works by George Balanchine, Nils Christie and Choo San Goh.Opening the evening was Balanchine's "Serenade" to "Serenade in C major for String Orchestra" by Tchaikovsky. It is the first ballet Balanchine created in the United States, and it remains the epitome of modern classical style.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2000
C. Stanley Bosley Jr., who as Goucher College comptroller for 31 years made sure the books were balanced and necessary disbursements made, died Tuesday of pneumonia at Manor Care-Ruxton. He was 81 and lived in Cockeysville. A man of medium build who wore glasses and a big smile, and was seldom without his snap-brim fedora, he was one of the most recognized and revered figures on the campus of the Towson college. Family members said he loved his work and enjoyed working with faculty members and students.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
As thousands of Baltimore-area college students accept their diplomas this spring, many will have found themselves profoundly transformed by the experience. Members of the Class of 2014 include a woman with cystic fibrosis who was told she would never live to see graduation. One is a South African who had her son while in college and hopes to return home to teach schoolchildren with special needs. One will fly to Kenya this summer to finish work on a clean drinking water system. Another had a turbulent childhood in foster care and spent time in jail before joining a church and enrolling in college.
SPORTS
By Mike Frainie and For The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
One of the area's best volleyball programs has announced a change in its coaching staff for next year, but the replacement will be well known to area volleyball fans. Larry Schofield, the varsity coach at Centennial, will step down after leading the program for seven years. He will be replaced by Mike Bossom, who coached at Centennial from 1994 to 2005, and won eight state titles at the school. Bossom is leaving Goucher College, where he was the head volleyball coach. “I just felt like my mental state wasn't where it needed to be,” Schofield said.
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