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By New York Daily News | March 13, 1992
NEW YORK -- A four-person team of federal prosecutors had their own stare-down with John Gotti yesterday after their star witness and birthday boy, Salvatore Gravano, testified that when Gotti barked, Sammy Bull bit.While Gravano, who turned 47 yesterday, and the jury were out of the courtroom on a break, the prosecutors lined up in a row against the jury-box railing and, with ironic smiles, stared at Gotti.Gotti, who has engaged his former underboss in similar displays of will, stared right back at John Gleeson and Assistant Prosecutors Laura Ward, Patrick Cotter and James Orenstein.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
When Yo Gotti comes to Baltimore, he feels at home. The 30-year-old rapper from Memphis, Tenn., says Charm City reminds him of his gritty hometown. "I like what the city stands for," said Gotti, who performs at Baltimore Soundstage on Sunday. "It's real people doing real [things]. It's no Hollywood" stuff. For any rap fan that has followed Yo Gotti's career - which began in 2000 with the independent rap album "From Da Dope Game 2 Da Rap Game" - his blue collar attitude should come as no surprise.
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NEWS
By Boston Globe | January 21, 1992
NEW YORK -- The plate glass facade at Taormina restaurant, in Little Italy here, provides a wide, clear view of Mulberry Street, and for that reason, not to mention the decent food, John Gotti is fond of it.Because even though Gotti likes to be seen, whenever he sat down to eat with the man said to be his right arm he was more preoccupied with seeing who might want to approach.But as Gotti scanned the street outside for potential trouble, as did his bodyguards who stood at the bar nursing ice waters, he should have looked no farther than across the table, where Salvatore Gravano broke bread with his friend and mentor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2012
The Black Keys have predictably sold out their show at the Verizon Center this Friday. But there's no need to pay a scalper or StubHub your life's savings for tickets. It's likely the band will return to the area this summer to play Merriweather Post Pavilion, says a reliable source with knowledge of the band's tour schedule. An announcement with the date is said to be forthcoming. Meanwhile, we've reached out to the band's reps for confirmation and we'll update when we hear back.  It would be the band's second recent appearance at Merriweather - they were one of the headliners at last year's Virgin Mobile FreeFest, where they gave one of the best performances of the night . They are on the road promoting new album "El Camino.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 18, 1992
NEW YORK -- John Gotti told a lawyer in a taped conversation replayed by the defense yesterday that he was not involved in the murder of Paul Castellano, a central charge in his racketeering-murder trial.In the conversation, which the government taped in 1989 with a bug hidden in the hallway of the Ravenite Social Club, Mr. Gotti spoke to a lawyer, Gerald L. Shargel, about the possibility of being arrested for the Castellano murder."If, if I'm gonna get pinched," he said on the tape, "I'll break their [obscenity]
NEWS
By New York Daily News | March 3, 1992
NEW YORK -- John Gotti and his turncoat underboss Salvatore "Sammy the Bull" Gravano were on hand as "backup shooters" when four gunmen shot down former Gambino family boss Paul Castellano, Mr. Gravano testified yesterday.In dramatic testimony, Mr. Gravano said he and Mr. Gotti were in a parked car ready to intervene in case the designated shooters encountered trouble in front of Sparks Steak House in midtown Manhattan on Dec. 16, 1985.Four other backups were nearby as four gunmen shot down Castellano and a Gambino family captain, Thomas Bilotti, who was also Castellano's driver and bodyguard.
FEATURES
By New York Daily News | April 8, 1992
NEW YORK -- If things had gone his way, John Gotti might have had an offer even he couldn't refuse.And it wouldn't be from the district attorney's office, either."
NEWS
By New York Times | March 10, 1992
NEW YORK -- A defense lawyer scornfully attacked the credibility of Salvatore Gravano yesterday, challenging his testimony that four gunmen all wore white raincoats and Russian fur hats when they killed Paul Castellano.But Gravano, a Mafia turncoat testifying as the prosecution's main witness against John Gotti, stuck to his story.He recalled planning the murder of Castellano, whom he depicted as the boss of the Gambino crime family, and said he and Gotti met with the team of gunmen in a park shortly before the slaying on Dec. 16, 1985.
NEWS
March 4, 1992
NEW YORK -- John Gotti made sure the job got done right when Mafia boss "Big Paul" Castellano was assassinated, driving slowly past the bullet-riddled body to make sure he was dead, Gotti's former right-hand man testified.Salvatore "Sammy Bull" Gravano described the 1985 hit during his second day on the stand Tuesday at Gotti's murder-racketeering trial.Prosecutors allege Gotti orchestrated the slaying of Castellano and his bodyguard, Thomas Bilotti, outside Sparks Steak House in Manhattan to seize control of the Gambino family, the nation's most powerful crime organization.
NEWS
By New York Daily News | March 12, 1992
NEW YORK -- Turncoat underboss Salvatore "Sammy Bull" Gravano killed his brother-in-law, then attended a funeral "for the hand" because the victim was dismembered and other body parts were never found.The chilling story was disclosed at the John Gotti trial yesterday by Anthony Cardinale, a lawyer for Gotti's co-defendant, but the jury never got to hear it because the judge ruled it too inflammatory.The victim was Gravano's wife's 22-year-old brother, Nick Scibetta, who was murdered in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, in 1978.
NEWS
By Anthony M. Destefano and Anthony M. Destefano,Newsday | October 21, 2006
NEW YORK -- After escaping conviction on federal racketeering charges three times in roughly a year, John A. Gotti - the son of the late Gambino crime boss - will finally be able to pursue what he claims he has long desired: an ordinary life. Yesterday, in a widely expected move, federal prosecutors in Manhattan dropped efforts to convict Gotti. He has been free on bail since the most recent mistrial last month. "The government has concluded that a retrial of defendant John A. Gotti on the pending indictment is not in the interests of justice in light of the three prior hung juries in the case," said U.S. Attorney Michael J. Garcia in a statement released yesterday.
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS | May 24, 2006
This week, I'm posing a question to myself: what do i think of victoria gotti's new cookbook, hot Italian dish? This has got to be one of the worst cookbooks to be published in years. We get a litany of Italian-American chestnuts, which, we must surmise, were inspired by a recent trip to "the Motherland." But Gotti's observations about Italian food range from prosaic to just plain wrong. During her trip she takes an "unforgettable" cooking lesson from Anna, an Italian home cook who teaches her how to make linguine with white clam sauce.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David W. Marston and David W. Marston,Special to the Sun | July 11, 2004
For American organized crime, the beginning of the end came in 1992. That's when the feds, armed with RICO, the anti-racketeering law, and the blood-drenched testimony of serial mob hitter Sammy "The Bull" Gravano, finally proved that while New York's last big don was indisputably dapper, he was not, after all, Teflon. Convicted on a wide-ranging racketeering indictment, John Gotti was sentenced to life without parole, solitary confinement 23 hours a day, the hardest of hard time. By the time throat cancer finally killed Gotti in 2002, it was widely accepted that the mob was also dead, ravaged by the same lethal combination of RICO and rats that had toppled Gotti.
NEWS
March 14, 2004
On March 12, 2004, JOHN H. "JACK" MORGAN; beloved husband of Dolores Morgan (nee Dodson); devoted father of John K. Morgan and Nicole D. Gotti, loving grandfather of Connor and Bryn Alex Morgan and Madison Gotti; dear son of Adelaide Morgan and the late Jack Morgan. A Funeral Service will be held at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc., 1050 York Rd., (Beltway exit 26-A), on Tuesday at 11 AM. Interment Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens, The family will receive friends on Monday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 PM.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2003
Cash from Baltimore's drug trade helped bankroll a rising New York record label that is now at the center of a federal money-laundering investigation and a heated war of words between some of rap's biggest stars, newly filed court records allege. The probe by authorities in New York casts the well-worn drug path to Baltimore as a trade route that provided start-up funds for music company Murder Inc. and portrays the label behind the careers of performers Ashanti and Ja Rule as secretly run by a convicted drug lord currently jailed in Maryland on a federal gun crime.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 26, 2002
ANYTHING COULD happen here. Anything might suddenly appear. You could walk up Broadway in Fells Point on a June evening, and on one side of the street there's a TV production crew setting up for another dramatization of Baltimore's drug scene, while on your side of the street a woman with a face burned and swollen by real life looks up from her squat on the sidewalk and stares at you through old-junkie eyes. You could be jauntily jangling quarters in your pocket while, 3 feet away, an old man fingers a slot in a newspaper box for forgotten change.
NEWS
By Newsday | April 3, 1992
NEW YORK -- Now that the jury has rendered its guilty verdict on John Gotti, his family is faced with the prodigious chore of storing the don's immense collection of fancy suits and ties for what could be a lifetime.But his other family -- the one that bears the name Gambino -- is faced with an even greater task: ridding itself of Gotti's brazen, stylish and ultimately suicidal image.After a 10-week trial, jurors deliberated 13 hours before finding Gotti guilty on all 13 of the murderand racketeering charges against him. He faces possible life imprisonment.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 11, 2002
John Gotti, who swaggered, schemed and murdered his way to the pinnacle of organized crime in America only to be toppled by secret FBI tapes and a turncoat mobster's testimony, died of cancer in a prison hospital in Springfield, Mo., yesterday while serving a life sentence. He was 61. Traditional Mafia leaders led publicity-shy lives. Not so Gotti, who reveled in media attention as the boss of the nation's largest and most influential organized crime group, the Gambino family. He cut a swashbuckling figure in New York City, wining and dining with show business celebrities in elegant restaurants and nightspots, surrounded by bodyguards.
NEWS
June 15, 2002
JOHN GOTTI, the New York City mobster who died last week of throat cancer, spent the last 10 years of his life in prison - far from the city lights and media glare on which he thrived. The "Dapper Don" will be interred in a Catholic cemetery along with such other infamous gangsters as Charles "Lucky" Luciano. But under its "scandal" precept for those who lived outside its teachings, the church has denied him a Mass of Christian Burial. "Scandal" is an understatement. Mr. Gotti, who took over one of the city's leading crime families in the 1980s, was a cold-blooded killer, responsible for an unknown number of murders.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 11, 2002
John Gotti, who swaggered, schemed and murdered his way to the pinnacle of organized crime in America only to be toppled by secret FBI tapes and a turncoat mobster's testimony, died of cancer in a prison hospital in Springfield, Mo., yesterday while serving a life sentence. He was 61. Traditional Mafia leaders led publicity-shy lives. Not so Gotti, who reveled in media attention as the boss of the nation's largest and most influential organized crime group, the Gambino family. He cut a swashbuckling figure in New York City, wining and dining with show business celebrities in elegant restaurants and nightspots, surrounded by bodyguards.
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