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NEWS
By ELLEN BARRY and ELLEN BARRY,LOS ANGELES TIME | April 23, 2006
OAK HILL, N.Y. -- Jared Paul Stern, the gossip writer, was mixing Campari-and-sodas on a recent evening when more urgent matters drew his attention. He stepped past his collection of walking sticks and looked onto the porch. "Snoods, quick, she's got a vole, and it's still alive," he said to his wife, Ruth Gutman, whom he calls by the pet name "Snoodles." "That cat goes on a kill-crazy rampage when spring comes," Stern said, darkly, returning to his desk. "She eats them," he said. "So."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Ethan Renner | July 29, 2013
"How many different kinds of disgusting do you have to be to boo a man who volunteered to fight and die for you?" -- Will McAvoy "Willie Pete," the third episode of "The Newsroom's" second season, opened with a Will McAvoy rave-out during a comment segment of News Night, as he railed against the audience at a Republican presidential debate in Orlando. The crowd booed a video question about gays in the military sent in by an active combat soldier. After going off on the crowd for their response, calling them "witless bullies and hapless punks," Will ripped the candidates for not denouncing the crowd reaction.
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NEWS
July 13, 1991
James Revson, 38, a society columnist for Newsday, died Thursday of AIDS in New York. He joined Newsday in 1984 as an architecture and design writer and in 1988 began writing the paper's society column, "Social Studies." That year he became celebrated himself after revealing that Suzy, the gossip columnist of the New York Post, had reported that many celebrities attended a gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art when in fact they had not been there.
NEWS
June 18, 2007
Claudia Cohen, 56, gossip columnist Claudia Cohen, a New York gossip columnist who became the subject of gossip herself when she married into the city's elite, died of ovarian cancer Friday at a Manhattan hospital, said Christine Taylor, a spokeswoman for her ex-husband, the billionaire Ronald Perelman. By the time of her death, Ms. Cohen was a millionaire socialite renowned for her contacts and East Hampton parties, but she had her start 30 years earlier as one of the first reporters for the New York Post's Page Six. Two years after her 1977 start at Page Six, she become the column's second editor, overseeing the coverage of such legendary locales as Studio 54. In the early 1980s, while writing a gossip column for the Daily News, Ms. Cohen began dating Mr. Perelman.
FEATURES
By HAL BOEDEKER and HAL BOEDEKER,ORLANDO SENTINEL | September 28, 1995
Newspaper editor-in-chief Mary Tyler Moore turns the world off with her frown. Gossip columnist Madeline Kahn moans about a black eye. Ace columnist Gregory Harrison frets about exposing a crooked source.Heartache propels the Big Apple journalism of CBS' "New York News." "A more dog-eating, back-biting, soul-stomping business I don't know of," editor Moore confides in tonight's premiere (9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13).Oh, Mare! You left out head-scratching, mind-numbing and channel-turning. No wonder the New York Reporter, a fictional tabloid, is close to folding.
NEWS
June 18, 2007
Claudia Cohen, 56, gossip columnist Claudia Cohen, a New York gossip columnist who became the subject of gossip herself when she married into the city's elite, died of ovarian cancer Friday at a Manhattan hospital, said Christine Taylor, a spokeswoman for her ex-husband, the billionaire Ronald Perelman. By the time of her death, Ms. Cohen was a millionaire socialite renowned for her contacts and East Hampton parties, but she had her start 30 years earlier as one of the first reporters for the New York Post's Page Six. Two years after her 1977 start at Page Six, she become the column's second editor, overseeing the coverage of such legendary locales as Studio 54. In the early 1980s, while writing a gossip column for the Daily News, Ms. Cohen began dating Mr. Perelman.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | July 5, 1991
"Hyde in Hollywood" gets off to a less than rousing start. The sets have that unreal, two-dimensional stagy feel that never looks quite right on television. That only emphasizes the actors' excessive theatricality that never sounds quite right on television.And it turns out this play is about playwrights, or, even worse, it's by a playwright writing about Hollywood screenwriters, so you figure the disdain will continue dripping off every character for two hours.But, stick with this PBS "American Playhouse" presentation because once you get by the roadblocks of these conventions, you discover a work of great depth and unusual resonance.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 11, 2005
Jamie Foxx has talked about his fear of getting "the fame face" - a complacent look that sometimes comes with show-biz success. Will Smith hasn't gotten there yet, but he should be wary of making more choices like Hitch. Smith deserves a smidgen of respect for what he does with this picture. He's agreeably smooth. His very presence puts velveteen on the rickety works of this slaphappy, sap-heavy farce and allows it to run pleasantly for about an hour. Yet he can't keep the movie from stopping cold with another hour left to go. Hitch will be a sizable hit. Audiences ache for romantic comedies at this time of year, and Hitch is as soft as a Valentine pillow embroidered with nostrums and surrounded by sugar and spice and everything nice.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ethan Renner | July 29, 2013
"How many different kinds of disgusting do you have to be to boo a man who volunteered to fight and die for you?" -- Will McAvoy "Willie Pete," the third episode of "The Newsroom's" second season, opened with a Will McAvoy rave-out during a comment segment of News Night, as he railed against the audience at a Republican presidential debate in Orlando. The crowd booed a video question about gays in the military sent in by an active combat soldier. After going off on the crowd for their response, calling them "witless bullies and hapless punks," Will ripped the candidates for not denouncing the crowd reaction.
NEWS
By CHRIS GUY and CHRIS GUY,SUN REPORTER | December 5, 2005
STILL POND -- Larry Penn counts out his serenity in small-town change. In the course of a crisp fall morning at the Still Pond Market - the two-story Victorian-era mercantile he bought 15 years ago - Penn casually tallies the coffee and cigarettes, sodas, Lance crackers and Twinkies. Bagging a "breakfast" hot dog for a customer with an iron constitution, he pauses to admire a neighbor's new shotgun. Penn punches the buttons to set the gasoline pump outside for a quick $5 sale, and breaks a $20 bill for a second-grader who needs "all ones, please."
NEWS
By ELLEN BARRY and ELLEN BARRY,LOS ANGELES TIME | April 23, 2006
OAK HILL, N.Y. -- Jared Paul Stern, the gossip writer, was mixing Campari-and-sodas on a recent evening when more urgent matters drew his attention. He stepped past his collection of walking sticks and looked onto the porch. "Snoods, quick, she's got a vole, and it's still alive," he said to his wife, Ruth Gutman, whom he calls by the pet name "Snoodles." "That cat goes on a kill-crazy rampage when spring comes," Stern said, darkly, returning to his desk. "She eats them," he said. "So."
NEWS
By CHRIS GUY and CHRIS GUY,SUN REPORTER | December 5, 2005
STILL POND -- Larry Penn counts out his serenity in small-town change. In the course of a crisp fall morning at the Still Pond Market - the two-story Victorian-era mercantile he bought 15 years ago - Penn casually tallies the coffee and cigarettes, sodas, Lance crackers and Twinkies. Bagging a "breakfast" hot dog for a customer with an iron constitution, he pauses to admire a neighbor's new shotgun. Penn punches the buttons to set the gasoline pump outside for a quick $5 sale, and breaks a $20 bill for a second-grader who needs "all ones, please."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 11, 2005
Jamie Foxx has talked about his fear of getting "the fame face" - a complacent look that sometimes comes with show-biz success. Will Smith hasn't gotten there yet, but he should be wary of making more choices like Hitch. Smith deserves a smidgen of respect for what he does with this picture. He's agreeably smooth. His very presence puts velveteen on the rickety works of this slaphappy, sap-heavy farce and allows it to run pleasantly for about an hour. Yet he can't keep the movie from stopping cold with another hour left to go. Hitch will be a sizable hit. Audiences ache for romantic comedies at this time of year, and Hitch is as soft as a Valentine pillow embroidered with nostrums and surrounded by sugar and spice and everything nice.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 22, 2003
In a posthumous family feud that has gossip columnists from New York to Palm Beach, Fla., abuzz, a Monkton man of prominent and notorious lineage wants his father's body exhumed and autopsied, seeking evidence for what he considers a suspicious death and his stepmother's odd behavior in its aftermath. F. Warrington Gillet III, 40, a descendant of the Tydings family whose own colorful background includes an acting role in a classic slasher movie and a part in a Wall Street scandal, says his father was in perfect health when he died in May. His father, F. Warrington Gillet Jr., 71, was a Realtor and a former liquor distributor in Maryland who had moved to Palm Beach about 35 years ago. "I just want justice done," Gillet said yesterday.
FEATURES
By HAL BOEDEKER and HAL BOEDEKER,ORLANDO SENTINEL | September 28, 1995
Newspaper editor-in-chief Mary Tyler Moore turns the world off with her frown. Gossip columnist Madeline Kahn moans about a black eye. Ace columnist Gregory Harrison frets about exposing a crooked source.Heartache propels the Big Apple journalism of CBS' "New York News." "A more dog-eating, back-biting, soul-stomping business I don't know of," editor Moore confides in tonight's premiere (9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13).Oh, Mare! You left out head-scratching, mind-numbing and channel-turning. No wonder the New York Reporter, a fictional tabloid, is close to folding.
NEWS
July 13, 1991
James Revson, 38, a society columnist for Newsday, died Thursday of AIDS in New York. He joined Newsday in 1984 as an architecture and design writer and in 1988 began writing the paper's society column, "Social Studies." That year he became celebrated himself after revealing that Suzy, the gossip columnist of the New York Post, had reported that many celebrities attended a gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art when in fact they had not been there.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 22, 2003
In a posthumous family feud that has gossip columnists from New York to Palm Beach, Fla., abuzz, a Monkton man of prominent and notorious lineage wants his father's body exhumed and autopsied, seeking evidence for what he considers a suspicious death and his stepmother's odd behavior in its aftermath. F. Warrington Gillet III, 40, a descendant of the Tydings family whose own colorful background includes an acting role in a classic slasher movie and a part in a Wall Street scandal, says his father was in perfect health when he died in May. His father, F. Warrington Gillet Jr., 71, was a Realtor and a former liquor distributor in Maryland who had moved to Palm Beach about 35 years ago. "I just want justice done," Gillet said yesterday.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | June 26, 2012
We have gotten used to Gov. Martin O'Malley's fondness for cable talk shows and the national media. But New York tabloids? Spotted! Our governor splashed across the pages of New York Post's Page Six, seen dining at the swank Upper East Side eatery Casa Lever with Baltimore bred actor Josh Charles and Brian Ellner, who led the New York push for same-sex marriage. But our sources say there were two others at the table. Longtime O'Malley fundraiser Colleen Martin-Lauer was there, we hear.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | July 5, 1991
"Hyde in Hollywood" gets off to a less than rousing start. The sets have that unreal, two-dimensional stagy feel that never looks quite right on television. That only emphasizes the actors' excessive theatricality that never sounds quite right on television.And it turns out this play is about playwrights, or, even worse, it's by a playwright writing about Hollywood screenwriters, so you figure the disdain will continue dripping off every character for two hours.But, stick with this PBS "American Playhouse" presentation because once you get by the roadblocks of these conventions, you discover a work of great depth and unusual resonance.
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