Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGospel
IN THE NEWS

Gospel

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | July 11, 2011
There's so much more to GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain that just making pizzas and running for president. Cain's little-known, years-old gospel album has just hit the Internets.  The first reviews are in -- and apparently Cain's a pretty money singer.  The Daily Caller's Matt Lewis gives it his approval: "This is actually pretty darn good. He has a great voice. "  Mediaite's Frances Martel also liked some of Cain's vocals: "It’s mostly standard gospel fare and mostly slow tracks at that, with one standout single: 'This is the Day,' a fast-paced track reminiscent of 'Footloose' that certainly wins the prize for funnest danceable track on the album.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
A cadre of spiritual giants was inducted Saturday into the National Great Blacks in Wax Museum as the East Baltimore gallery looks to expand in its third decade. About 1,000 people gathered in Morgan State University's Murphy Fine Arts Center for a tribute ceremony honoring three pastors and a gospel singer for their roles inspiring the country through faith. "Thank God for blessing them so that they could bless others," Rep. Elijah Cummings told the audience. "I want to thank our honorees for changing the trajectory of so many people's destiny.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | March 21, 2010
"Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness ..." -- Matthew 5:6 ƒ} Ultimately, I suppose, what we're talking about is a clash between the sweet by and by and the fierce urgency of now. The former is the refrain from a venerable gospel song that meditates on the bliss of life after life. The latter is a phrase from Martin Luther King's "I Have A Dream" speech, a passionate demand for justice, equality and freedom, "now." Into the tension between these two disparate views of Christian mission stumbles one Glenn Beck.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | May 3, 2014
Faith is making a comeback among liberal Democrats, but they still have a ways to go. First, some history. Hoping to attract some Evangelical Christian votes more than 20 years ago, former vice president Al Gore wrote that the biblical story of Noah and the Ark could be paraphrased in modern terms, "Thou shalt preserve biodiversity" ("Earth in the Balance" p. 245). Mr. Gore also claimed the first recorded instance of pollution was when Cain killed Abel and Abel's blood "falls on the ground, rendering it fallow" (p. 247)
NEWS
February 7, 2011
Was I the only one to take offense at the disgraceful rendition of The Star Spangled Banner at the Superbowl? Above and beyond the fact that Christina Aguilera flubbed the lyrics was her embarrassingly tasteless presentation of our national anthem to millions of people around the world. If we are determined to come across as a country of loud, ignorant barbarians, she does the job. Mary Lou Wickham, Glen Arm
NEWS
August 5, 2007
Where do you go to find out about the history of gospel music? You can try the Internet. However, Bil Carpenter, who has done promotions work for such artists as Baltimore's Jonathan Nelson, the Staple Singers and Shirley Ceaser, has put together Uncloudy Days (Backbeat), a gospel music encyclopedia about more than 650 artists and personalities from 1900 to the present. Carpenter, a Washington resident, says he began the project because of his interest in history. He got into gospel music as a youth and started to collect information about the artists.
NEWS
June 5, 1991
Funeral services for Katherine "Kitty" Broady, a longtime hostess of Baltimore gospel radio shows, will be held at noon tomorrow at Union Baptist Church, 1219 Druid Hill Ave.Broady, 69, was killed in a deliberately set fire at her home on Liberty Heights Avenue on May 31.Broady's local radio career spanned nearly three decades, during which time she was the hostess of popular gospel shows on WEBB, WCBM and WANN in Annapolis.She was often a voice for the disenfranchised, and in the late 1960s she sponsored a benefit to feed the hungry in Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Michael HIll | March 5, 1991
If you watch and listen to "Going Home to Gospel with Patti LaBelle," you can hear them. You can hear Aretha Franklin and Sam Cooke. You can hear the Temptations and the Four Tops. You can even hear James Brown. I feel good.This hour makes it abundantly evident that so much of our popular music was nourished by the waters of this important river that usually flows a bit beyond the edge of the media spotlight.Just as most great rock and roll doesn't take place on arena stages or stadium Diamond Vision screens, but in hot, sweaty little bars and cafes, so gospel sings its best every Sunday morning in black churches throughout the land.
NEWS
September 2, 2007
Cecil College's annual Gospel Explosion will have a new format when the Annapolis Mass Choir presents the full length musical "Gospel Music Sho'Nuff Stirs My Soul," at 4 p.m. Saturday in the Milburn Stone Theatre on Cecil's North East campus. The program is a journey through the chronicles of gospel music, featuring singers, dancers and actors. The musical is set in Hobart and Haweda Jenkins' quaint abode, which becomes the platform for runaway slaves, operatic freedom singers, robust tenors and jazzy juke-jointers who pay homage to yesterday's gospel greats.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 28, 1996
If ever a soundtrack project seemed tailor-made for Whitney Houston's talents, it's "The Preacher's Wife" (Arista 18951). Not only does it offer all the expected opportunities for powerhouse vocal displays and stirring romantic balladry, but its church-oriented setting also affords the singer a chance to get back to her roots and sing some gospel music. How could it be anything less than perfect?Trust me, it can.Although hardly a disaster, "The Preacher's Wife" is considerably less than divine.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
Pamela Audrey Hall, a former radio station program director who was active nationally in jazz and contemporary gospel music circles, died of cancer Jan. 21 at St. Agnes Hospital. She was 57 and lived in Ellicott City. She was named Black Radio's Music Director of the Year in 1992. Billboard Magazine also nominated her as music director of the year. Born in Philadelphia, she was the daughter of Dr. William Martin Hall, a gynecologist at Sinai Hospital and the old Lutheran and Provident hospitals, who was a founder of the Garwyn Medical Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
This uplifting video came to my attention today and I just had to share it. Even if you're sick of choral flashmob events in stores, you're bound to find this one irresistible.  Seems that the famed Soweto Gospel Choir was planning a flashmob at a Woolworths in Pretoria to promote the charity Operation Smile Christmas. News of Nelson Mandela's death arrived shortly before the project began, so the ensemble changed the music, replacing a James Brown song with an anthem from the 1980s by Johnny Clegg, "Asimbonanga," a plea for Mandela's release from jail.
NEWS
By William E. Lori | September 29, 2013
There's no doubt about it, Pope Francis has captured the attention of the Catholic Church and the world. And he is doing this not only by a simplicity and humility that has earned him the nickname, "the world's parish priest" but also by taking the church back to the basics. Through his humble actions and kind words, the pope is reminding all Catholics - including us bishops - that our first priority is and must always be to know and love God the Father who has revealed his love through his Son Jesus Christ, a love that is communicated to us through the Holy Spirit.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
As afternoon light tried to filter through the thick, stained-glass windows of Sharp Street United Methodist Church last weekend, Marco K. Merrick pounded out the bass line of a spiritual on a raw-sounding piano, singing along in a raspy voice: "Great day, the righteous marching. Great day, God's going to build up Zion's walls. " From the tightly packed pews in front of him, basses and baritones of the Community Concert Choir of Baltimore picked up the vocal line tentatively at first, but gained in confidence with each measure.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | August 14, 2012
Gospel music lovers missed their chances to purchase tickets for this year's "Afternoon of Musical Praise" featuring Grammy-winning artist Yolanda Adams, slated for Aug. 18 at Aberdeen Proving Ground's Post Theater. The concert sold out almost two weeks ago. Community response coupled with major sponsorship support spiked the concert as "a must attend" event in Harford County, event organizers said. "Ames United Methodist Church tapped into some of the area's finest talent in music and dance to share the stage with a national recording artist," said Renee L. Johnson, event chair.
EXPLORE
By Gwendolyn Glenn | July 3, 2012
For those who enjoy listening to R&B, jazz, gospel and other music recorded mainly by African-American musicians, being able to find it in numerous places along the radio dial is something we take for granted these days. Some of my young nieces and nephews find it hard to believe that in the early years of radio, most white station owners banned R&B recordings, or race records as they called them, on the airwaves. Although the ban had been lifted in some cities by the late 1950s, when I was growing up in The South in the 1960s, we still only heard one or two songs by African-American artists played on my local radio station, WCKM, in Winnsboro, S.C. We went to nearby Columbia several times a week where we could hear R&B on a black-owned station there, but its signal didn't reach my hometown after sundown.
NEWS
By William E. Lori | September 29, 2013
There's no doubt about it, Pope Francis has captured the attention of the Catholic Church and the world. And he is doing this not only by a simplicity and humility that has earned him the nickname, "the world's parish priest" but also by taking the church back to the basics. Through his humble actions and kind words, the pope is reminding all Catholics - including us bishops - that our first priority is and must always be to know and love God the Father who has revealed his love through his Son Jesus Christ, a love that is communicated to us through the Holy Spirit.
NEWS
June 19, 2012
The Catholic bishops really don't get it. Many of us are disturbed by what is happening to our church, but it will take a lot more than a PR campaign to change perceptions ("U.S. Catholic bishops plan united front," June 13). We are not as concerned by presentation as we are by the content of what many bishops are saying. We are opposed to the continuing suppression of women, the campaign to violate the civil rights of our gay fellow citizens, the protection of pedophile priests, the increase in financial scandals, the lack of transparency, general corruption as well as the unrelenting attacks on our truly ethical and moral president as well as Catholic politicians.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | May 19, 2012
It is one thing to talk about "fairness" when it comes to allowing gays and lesbians to marry; it is quite another to claim biblical authority for such relationships. President Barack Obama cited the "Golden Rule" about treating others as you would like to be treated, but in doing so he ignored the totality of Scripture and the Lord himself, who alone gets to set the rules for human behavior. The president says he is a "practicing Christian. " It is difficult to be one while simultaneously holding a low view of the Bible, which his position on several social issues might suggest.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.