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NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | July 21, 2002
Q. How do I make the sugar-coated walnuts that are often paired with Gorgonzola in certain salads? I love that combination of sweet and sharp flavors. A. If you're starting your meal with a baby arugula and grape tomato salad topped with Gorgonzola and candied walnuts, I just can't wait to hear about the entree. Maybe in the back of your mind you're dreaming about your own restaurant -- a nice little romantic place with a blackboard menu. Or maybe you're just thinking: No, dumbbell, I just want to make candied walnuts.
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EXPLORE
By Jennifer Broadwater | October 8, 2012
Southworth reflects: I chose this particular dish because I love the smell of slow-cooking meat on a brisk fall day. The slow cooking breaks down the meat to make it melt in your mouth. And I just love blue cheese (Gorgonzola) with beef; the flavors burst in your mouth. The Calvados Sidecar pairs nicely with the meal, especially because of the fall-evoking apple flavor of the brandy. Cab Braised Short Rib Ingredients: Short Rib: •    4 pounds beef short ribs •    1 tablespoon fresh rosemary •    1 tablespoon fresh thyme •    1 tablespoon kosher salt •    1 tablespoon black salt •    ¼ cup vegetable oil •    1 750-milliliter cabernet sauvignon •    1 tablespoon butter •    1 tablespoon all-purpose flour Polenta: •    5 cups chicken stock •    1 ¾ cups polenta •    ¾ cup crumbled Gorgonzola •    ¿ cup heavy cream Gremolata: •    ¼ cup chopped parsley •    3 tablespoons grated lemon zest •    2 cloves garlic, minced •    2 tablespoons chopped rosemary •    2 tablespoons chopped thyme Directions: Mix rosemary, thyme, salt and pepper and sprinkle over ribs.
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NEWS
September 25, 2005
Donna Crivello, owner of Donna's, says salads are always on the menu at her restaurants and in her home, "not only as starters or sides but the main dish. It is easy to build your salad into something special with a little planning, and using some seasonal ingredients, such as this recipe with roasted pears, gorgonzola and greens." Salad of Roasted Pears with Gorgonzola on greens with Raspberry Vinaigrette Serves 4 as a main dish 4 firm pears, Bartlett, cut in half 2 tablespoons olive oil 4-6 ounces Gorgonzola cheese 12 ounces mixed greens RASPBERRY VINAIGRETTE: 1/3 cup raspberry vinegar 2/3 cup oil, walnut, canola or olive oil 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon chopped shallots TOPPING: 2-3 ounces walnuts or pecans, chopped Heat oven to 375 degrees.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2012
BRIO Tuscan Grille is headed for a March 2 opening. The restaurant will be located on the corner of Pratt and Calvert streets, in a space formerly occupied by a Legal Seafood. BRIO will occupy 7,200 square feet at 100 East Pratt Street , with indoor seating for 180 in addition to a 16-seat bar and 69-seat terrace. BRIO, which is described as "an upscale affordable restaurant serving authentic, northern Italian cuisine," will be open seven nights a week for dinner, weekdays for lunch and weekends for a "Bellini brunch.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun reporter | July 25, 2007
Mastering the Grill By Andrew Schloss and David Joachim Extreme Barbecue Smokin' Rigs and Real Good Recipes By Dan Huntley and Lisa Grace Lednicer Chronicle Books / 2007 / $18.95 What's better than good food? A good story. This book tells the story of barbecue fanatics around the country - folks like Mike Shugart of South Carolina, who built a contraption that resembles a furnace to cook Boston butt, and Maximino Rios of Charlotte, N.C., who cooks goat meat over heated stones in his backyard the way the ancient Mayans did. And then there are Randy Campbell and Bob Fowler, a couple of Midwesterners who grill chicken and burgers on the scoop of a front-end loader, and Mark Doxtader of Oregon, who makes a pita-bread recipe in a handcrafted kiln.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2012
BRIO Tuscan Grille is headed for a March 2 opening. The restaurant will be located on the corner of Pratt and Calvert streets, in a space formerly occupied by a Legal Seafood. BRIO will occupy 7,200 square feet at 100 East Pratt Street , with indoor seating for 180 in addition to a 16-seat bar and 69-seat terrace. BRIO, which is described as "an upscale affordable restaurant serving authentic, northern Italian cuisine," will be open seven nights a week for dinner, weekdays for lunch and weekends for a "Bellini brunch.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | September 16, 1998
Danger, dieters! Krispy Kreme's komingLife is good now that Krispy Kreme doughnuts have become a trendy food. These luscious fat- and sugar-laden icons from the South have a cult following, are served in fine New York restaurants and have even been the subject of a Smithsonian exhibit. Now Baltimoreans will get a chance to find out why. Our first Krispy Kreme franchise will open next month at 8010 Belair Road, just off the Beltway. Look for two additional area stores in early '99. Yum.Quick pasta sauceHere's a quick but elegant little pasta sauce adapted from a recipe in the new "Good Housekeeping Best One-Dish Meals" (William Morrow, 1998)
EXPLORE
By Jennifer Broadwater | October 8, 2012
Southworth reflects: I chose this particular dish because I love the smell of slow-cooking meat on a brisk fall day. The slow cooking breaks down the meat to make it melt in your mouth. And I just love blue cheese (Gorgonzola) with beef; the flavors burst in your mouth. The Calvados Sidecar pairs nicely with the meal, especially because of the fall-evoking apple flavor of the brandy. Cab Braised Short Rib Ingredients: Short Rib: •    4 pounds beef short ribs •    1 tablespoon fresh rosemary •    1 tablespoon fresh thyme •    1 tablespoon kosher salt •    1 tablespoon black salt •    ¼ cup vegetable oil •    1 750-milliliter cabernet sauvignon •    1 tablespoon butter •    1 tablespoon all-purpose flour Polenta: •    5 cups chicken stock •    1 ¾ cups polenta •    ¾ cup crumbled Gorgonzola •    ¿ cup heavy cream Gremolata: •    ¼ cup chopped parsley •    3 tablespoons grated lemon zest •    2 cloves garlic, minced •    2 tablespoons chopped rosemary •    2 tablespoons chopped thyme Directions: Mix rosemary, thyme, salt and pepper and sprinkle over ribs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2008
Grill Art Cafe is Hampden's little restaurant that could. The early days at this handsome cafe were awfully rough, with service problems enduring well past the grace period most diners extend to a new restaurant. Grill Art has hung in there, though - going on five years now - and it's evolved into a very decent dining option. Operating out of the spotlight has probably helped, and hard work definitely hasn't hurt - Grill Art serves lunch, or brunch, and dinner seven days a week. My guess is that people started rediscovering Grill Art when their first choice on the Avenue was booked.
FEATURES
By MARY MAUSHARD and MARY MAUSHARD,The Evening Sun The Sun The Sunday Sun | August 10, 1991
Paolo's, Light Street Pavilion, Harborplace, 539-7060. While Harborplace is fine for fried dough and stand-up hot dogs, it is inappropriate for Paolo's, which specializes in fine Italian food and pizza cooked in a wood-burning stove. Our meal was excellent. With each course, we realized that this was superlative food -- delightfully innovative, creatively seasoned, beautifully presented -- a treat to the senses. The Tortellini Rose ($9.95), rich with basil and Gorgonzola cheese, was outstanding, as were the desserts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2008
Grill Art Cafe is Hampden's little restaurant that could. The early days at this handsome cafe were awfully rough, with service problems enduring well past the grace period most diners extend to a new restaurant. Grill Art has hung in there, though - going on five years now - and it's evolved into a very decent dining option. Operating out of the spotlight has probably helped, and hard work definitely hasn't hurt - Grill Art serves lunch, or brunch, and dinner seven days a week. My guess is that people started rediscovering Grill Art when their first choice on the Avenue was booked.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun reporter | July 25, 2007
Mastering the Grill By Andrew Schloss and David Joachim Extreme Barbecue Smokin' Rigs and Real Good Recipes By Dan Huntley and Lisa Grace Lednicer Chronicle Books / 2007 / $18.95 What's better than good food? A good story. This book tells the story of barbecue fanatics around the country - folks like Mike Shugart of South Carolina, who built a contraption that resembles a furnace to cook Boston butt, and Maximino Rios of Charlotte, N.C., who cooks goat meat over heated stones in his backyard the way the ancient Mayans did. And then there are Randy Campbell and Bob Fowler, a couple of Midwesterners who grill chicken and burgers on the scoop of a front-end loader, and Mark Doxtader of Oregon, who makes a pita-bread recipe in a handcrafted kiln.
NEWS
September 25, 2005
Donna Crivello, owner of Donna's, says salads are always on the menu at her restaurants and in her home, "not only as starters or sides but the main dish. It is easy to build your salad into something special with a little planning, and using some seasonal ingredients, such as this recipe with roasted pears, gorgonzola and greens." Salad of Roasted Pears with Gorgonzola on greens with Raspberry Vinaigrette Serves 4 as a main dish 4 firm pears, Bartlett, cut in half 2 tablespoons olive oil 4-6 ounces Gorgonzola cheese 12 ounces mixed greens RASPBERRY VINAIGRETTE: 1/3 cup raspberry vinegar 2/3 cup oil, walnut, canola or olive oil 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon chopped shallots TOPPING: 2-3 ounces walnuts or pecans, chopped Heat oven to 375 degrees.
NEWS
By Elinor Klivans and Elinor Klivans,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 23, 2003
Twelve years ago, we were in a small Tuscan village having dinner with our Italian friends when for dessert they served fresh pears and some sort of a super-creamy, ultra-smooth cheese. It looked a little like cream cheese, but had none of the tart flavor or firm texture of cream cheese. This cheese was naturally sweet and was like nothing I had ever tasted before. It was mascarpone. I returned home eager to buy some, but found out it was not exactly a supermarket staple. In fact, it was not available to me at all. But, fast-forward to the present and there is good news.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | July 21, 2002
Q. How do I make the sugar-coated walnuts that are often paired with Gorgonzola in certain salads? I love that combination of sweet and sharp flavors. A. If you're starting your meal with a baby arugula and grape tomato salad topped with Gorgonzola and candied walnuts, I just can't wait to hear about the entree. Maybe in the back of your mind you're dreaming about your own restaurant -- a nice little romantic place with a blackboard menu. Or maybe you're just thinking: No, dumbbell, I just want to make candied walnuts.
FEATURES
By Linda Giuca and Linda Giuca,HARTFORD COURANT | July 19, 2000
There is something extra delicious about a spur-of-the-moment picnic. Maybe the spontaneous break from the daily grind is the reason. All it takes is a sunny day, the clock ticking toward noon and a deli just steps from the office or home. In minutes, you can be munching on lunch in a park or in your own back yard. Sometimes an impromptu picnic becomes one of the most memorable meals on a vacation, particularly in Europe, where the delicatessens, cheese shops and bakeries offer foods too aromatic and mouthwatering to pass up. Closer to home, the ever-growing supply of prepared foods for working adults too tired to cook means more variety for last-minute picnickers.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1996
Cheese is among the most versatile of foods, which makes it great for entertaining, whether casual or formal. It works served quite simply, with French bread and a glass of wine or beer, or it can be made far more elegant and complex, such as drizzled with liqueur, topped with apricots, raisins, and pine nuts and lightly baked.We asked a couple of chefs, a purveyor and a cheese book author for some suggestions for serving cheese, and how to select cheeses and accompaniments for a cheese plate (country of origin and type of milk are indicated in brackets after cheese names)
FEATURES
By Linda Giuca and Linda Giuca,HARTFORD COURANT | July 19, 2000
There is something extra delicious about a spur-of-the-moment picnic. Maybe the spontaneous break from the daily grind is the reason. All it takes is a sunny day, the clock ticking toward noon and a deli just steps from the office or home. In minutes, you can be munching on lunch in a park or in your own back yard. Sometimes an impromptu picnic becomes one of the most memorable meals on a vacation, particularly in Europe, where the delicatessens, cheese shops and bakeries offer foods too aromatic and mouthwatering to pass up. Closer to home, the ever-growing supply of prepared foods for working adults too tired to cook means more variety for last-minute picnickers.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | September 16, 1998
Danger, dieters! Krispy Kreme's komingLife is good now that Krispy Kreme doughnuts have become a trendy food. These luscious fat- and sugar-laden icons from the South have a cult following, are served in fine New York restaurants and have even been the subject of a Smithsonian exhibit. Now Baltimoreans will get a chance to find out why. Our first Krispy Kreme franchise will open next month at 8010 Belair Road, just off the Beltway. Look for two additional area stores in early '99. Yum.Quick pasta sauceHere's a quick but elegant little pasta sauce adapted from a recipe in the new "Good Housekeeping Best One-Dish Meals" (William Morrow, 1998)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Rottenberg and Laura Rottenberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 13, 1997
In the early '90s, the Cal-Ital bistro was a new species in Baltimore. We'd seen them in other cities: bustling, minimalist-chic restaurants serving dazzling vegetable-heavy fare to an equally stunning young professional crowd. Paolo's, -- with a location in Towson and another in the Light Street Pavilion of Harborplace was among the area's first examples of the breed. Others have come and gone, but after nearly a decade, Paolo's continues to age gracefully.The parent company, Capital Restaurant Concepts, has maintained a stylish interior -- open show kitchen, crackling brick oven, and lots of black marble and Italian track lighting -- and a contemporary, affordable menu of light, unfussy pastas, salads and entrees.
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