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NEWS
By Newsday | September 9, 1993
NEW YORK -- Vice President Al Gore proved himself master of the one-liner last night when he made an appearance on the "Late Show With David Letterman" and joked about how stiff he is."I'm so stiff, when I went to the forest I was cut down by a logger," Gore deadpanned.The vice president was in town to "do" the Letterman and Phil Donahue shows in a public relations assault aimed at getting the public interested in the administration's plans to reform the bureaucracy.Gore even offered a Top 10 List of "Good Things About Being Vice President."
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 20, 2002
WASHINGTON -- On the heels of former Vice President Al Gore's latest public re-emergence, members of the Democratic National Committee, responding to a Los Angeles Times poll, are distinctly cool to the prospect of his seeking the party's presidential nomination in 2004. While he is the front-runner among the 312 DNC members surveyed, he is barely so, being named by 19 percent to 18 percent for Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts and 13 percent for Sen. John Edwards of North Carolina, among a field of 10 possible hopefuls listed.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 23, 2002
WASHINGTON -- After months of quietly moving around in the shadows of politics, former Vice President Al Gore will surface in Nashville on Feb. 2 for a big fund-raising rally in a downtown hotel for the Tennessee Democratic Party. Many of his supporters will say it's about time. In a sense, Mr. Gore will be doing no more than what he said he would be doing when he made his graceful exit from the political stage via television on Dec. 13, 2000: "spend time in Tennessee and mend some fences, literally and figuratively."
NEWS
By George F. Will | May 2, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Bill Bradley's new best friends, whose numbers grow exponentially as his poll numbers progress arithmetically, say he will campaign on big ideas. But right now Mr. Bradley should not distract attention from Vice President Al Gore, whose difficulties multiply. And Mr. Bradley's recent foray into the politics of ideas did not make sensible people impatient for his next foray.Mr. Gore knows that serving vice presidents who have wanted their parties' nominations have succeeded recently (Richard Nixon in 1960, Hubert Humphrey in 1968, George Bush in 1988)
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | April 12, 1999
COLO, Iowa -- It's early morning and Vice President Al Gore, fresh from an overnight stay at the farm of Keith and Susan McKinney, is busily working the breakfast crowd at a nearby coffee shop.Dressed in blue work shirt and jeans, he moves unhurriedly from table to table, shaking hands and enthusing about the buttermilk pancakes and sausages his hostess had served him earlier.The talk between the vice president and the breakfasting Iowans is mostly about family, his and theirs. He makes no effort to rush as he moves through the room to press for their votes in the Iowa presidential caucuses still 10 months off.As Mr. Gore makes his rounds, a bevy of television cameramen hovers over the scene, and a boom mike is held high over his head to pick up the chit-chat.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | January 20, 1993
In her 30 years with Baltimore city schools, Frances Kessler never imagined her job as a teacher would lead her to a presidential inaugural ball. But that's just where she'll be tonight, at the invitation of the new vice president himself.Mrs. Kessler met Al and Tipper Gore in 1989 after their son, Albert III, was seriously injured by a car in front of Memorial Stadium and was hospitalized at Johns Hopkins Children's Center.A teacher in the city's Chronically Health-Impaired Program (CHIP)
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | December 3, 2000
FLORIDA HAS NOW given us the most famous dimples since Shirley Temple and the most famous long count since Tunney and Dempsey. Meanwhile, the Gore camp has given us the most shameless lies since Bill Clinton. Lie No. 1 is that "uncounted votes" are out there, which should be counted because "every vote should count." Not only have all the votes been counted, partisan guesses about ballots by officials in heavily Democratic counties have also been counted as if they were votes -- and Mr. Gore still lost.
NEWS
By JOAN BECK | October 1, 1992
Chicago. -- The Clinton-Gore campaign is soft-focusing the environmental convictions of the vice- presidential candidate -- with good reason.The senator from Tennessee has bought into the whole extremist, apocalyptic, sky-is-dying vision of the global future and has been advocating sweeping measures that would require enormous economic, political and lifestyle changes throughout the world and especially in the United States.Al Gore has been calling for no small plans to improve Earth's environment.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | November 3, 2000
MINNEAPOLIS -- When a buoyant George W. Bush flew into Minnesota Wednesday for a big, boisterous airport hangar rally here, he ignited the crowd by declaring: "We're going to carry this state! You know it, I know it, the only people who don't know are our opponents, and they're fixin' to find out!" That very morning, a poll for the St. Paul Pioneer Press showed Vice President Al Gore's 47-41 percent majority lead of a month ago having shrunk to a 44-41 margin, with Green Party nominee Ralph Nader the beneficiary, rising from 4 percent to 8 percent in that time.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Staff Writer | July 20, 1992
UTICA, Ohio -- Since they began their eight-state bus tour Friday, Bill Clinton and Albert Gore Jr. have tossed a football, worn blue jeans, played miniature golf, hugged their wives and spoken twice in front of likenesses of John F. Kennedy.They're casting themselves as youthful activists, a new generation of political leadership that is heir to Mr. Kennedy and is in touch with everyday Americans.Audiences have loved it, so far.The candidates were enthusiastically welcomed yesterday by an overflow crowd at a community center in Weirton, W.Va.
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