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By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | April 12, 1999
COLO, Iowa -- It's early morning and Vice President Al Gore, fresh from an overnight stay at the farm of Keith and Susan McKinney, is busily working the breakfast crowd at a nearby coffee shop.Dressed in blue work shirt and jeans, he moves unhurriedly from table to table, shaking hands and enthusing about the buttermilk pancakes and sausages his hostess had served him earlier.The talk between the vice president and the breakfasting Iowans is mostly about family, his and theirs. He makes no effort to rush as he moves through the room to press for their votes in the Iowa presidential caucuses still 10 months off.As Mr. Gore makes his rounds, a bevy of television cameramen hovers over the scene, and a boom mike is held high over his head to pick up the chit-chat.
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FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | January 20, 1993
In her 30 years with Baltimore city schools, Frances Kessler never imagined her job as a teacher would lead her to a presidential inaugural ball. But that's just where she'll be tonight, at the invitation of the new vice president himself.Mrs. Kessler met Al and Tipper Gore in 1989 after their son, Albert III, was seriously injured by a car in front of Memorial Stadium and was hospitalized at Johns Hopkins Children's Center.A teacher in the city's Chronically Health-Impaired Program (CHIP)
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | December 3, 2000
FLORIDA HAS NOW given us the most famous dimples since Shirley Temple and the most famous long count since Tunney and Dempsey. Meanwhile, the Gore camp has given us the most shameless lies since Bill Clinton. Lie No. 1 is that "uncounted votes" are out there, which should be counted because "every vote should count." Not only have all the votes been counted, partisan guesses about ballots by officials in heavily Democratic counties have also been counted as if they were votes -- and Mr. Gore still lost.
NEWS
By JOAN BECK | October 1, 1992
Chicago. -- The Clinton-Gore campaign is soft-focusing the environmental convictions of the vice- presidential candidate -- with good reason.The senator from Tennessee has bought into the whole extremist, apocalyptic, sky-is-dying vision of the global future and has been advocating sweeping measures that would require enormous economic, political and lifestyle changes throughout the world and especially in the United States.Al Gore has been calling for no small plans to improve Earth's environment.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | November 3, 2000
MINNEAPOLIS -- When a buoyant George W. Bush flew into Minnesota Wednesday for a big, boisterous airport hangar rally here, he ignited the crowd by declaring: "We're going to carry this state! You know it, I know it, the only people who don't know are our opponents, and they're fixin' to find out!" That very morning, a poll for the St. Paul Pioneer Press showed Vice President Al Gore's 47-41 percent majority lead of a month ago having shrunk to a 44-41 margin, with Green Party nominee Ralph Nader the beneficiary, rising from 4 percent to 8 percent in that time.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | January 16, 2004
NEW YORK - President Bush is a "moral coward" who is too "weak" to say no to political backers in the coal, oil, utility and mining industries, former Vice President Al Gore charged yesterday in an environmental speech. Gore's address to a packed house at the Beacon Theater was his most personal denunciation yet of the man who defeated him in the 2000 presidential election, and it came at a time when some pollsters and Democratic activists suggest Bush might be vulnerable to such attacks.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 29, 2004
Former Vice President Al Gore announced yesterday that he will give $4 million in leftover campaign funds to the Democratic National Committee's campaign to defeat President Bush in the fall election. The man who narrowly lost the presidency in 2000 said in a prepared statement that he would give the money to oppose his onetime Republican foe. He's giving another $2.5 million to Democratic candidates for the U.S. House, Senate and in local races in Florida and Tennessee. "The outcome of this election is extremely important for the future of our country and for all that America stands for," Gore said.
NEWS
By Daniel L. Buccino | August 22, 2000
IT IS just plain wrong to take out our collective Clinton fatigue on a loyal and industrious vice-president while the president's own popularity remains artificially inflated by his many charms. It is indeed time for the country to restore dignity to the Oval Office, but we need not recycle people and policies that we renounced eight years ago for that virtue. It is time to do something different, but not to get that difference confused with party affiliation. All the complaints about Al Gore sound precisely like advertisements for the character traits we should want in our commander-in-chief.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | October 23, 2000
WASHINGTON - Vice President Al Gore's decision to ask President Clinton to take to the stump for him in the final weeks of the presidential campaign may be seen as a sign of weakness after Mr. Gore's repeated affirmation that he is running "as my own man." But with his race against Gov. George W. Bush apparently heading for a photo finish, he would have been foolish to do otherwise. Mr. Gore's conspicuously aloof posture toward the man under whom he has served for nearly eight years was beginning to become a negative story in itself.
NEWS
By Thomas Schaller | March 28, 2007
Al Gore came a long way to talk about global warming with his former congressional colleagues, but the distance was more psychic than physical. He had to cover a lot of personal ground in order to arrive in Washington last week as a certifiable celebrity and Oscar-winning star of the documentary An Inconvenient Truth. As I watched Mr. Gore testify before the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works, that fateful winter six years ago - when Mr. Gore had to concede the presidential race and then certify George W. Bush's election from the floor of the Senate - seemed like six decades ago. Mr. Gore's bete noire is the committee's ranking Republican, James M. Inhofe.
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