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By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | October 23, 2000
WASHINGTON - Vice President Al Gore's decision to ask President Clinton to take to the stump for him in the final weeks of the presidential campaign may be seen as a sign of weakness after Mr. Gore's repeated affirmation that he is running "as my own man." But with his race against Gov. George W. Bush apparently heading for a photo finish, he would have been foolish to do otherwise. Mr. Gore's conspicuously aloof posture toward the man under whom he has served for nearly eight years was beginning to become a negative story in itself.
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NEWS
By Thomas Schaller | March 28, 2007
Al Gore came a long way to talk about global warming with his former congressional colleagues, but the distance was more psychic than physical. He had to cover a lot of personal ground in order to arrive in Washington last week as a certifiable celebrity and Oscar-winning star of the documentary An Inconvenient Truth. As I watched Mr. Gore testify before the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works, that fateful winter six years ago - when Mr. Gore had to concede the presidential race and then certify George W. Bush's election from the floor of the Senate - seemed like six decades ago. Mr. Gore's bete noire is the committee's ranking Republican, James M. Inhofe.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 28, 2006
WASHINGTON -- "I wanted it, and it was not to be," said Al Gore, the former vice president and two-time presidential candidate. "I am not pursuing it. I have been there, and I have done that." Gore was on the telephone from New York, taking a break from promoting his book and documentary about global warming, to dismiss speculation that his rising profile should be interpreted as the first stirrings of another bid for the White House. "Why should I run for office?" Gore asked. "I have no interest in running for office.
NEWS
By JOAN BECK | October 1, 1992
Chicago. -- The Clinton-Gore campaign is soft-focusing the environmental convictions of the vice- presidential candidate -- with good reason.The senator from Tennessee has bought into the whole extremist, apocalyptic, sky-is-dying vision of the global future and has been advocating sweeping measures that would require enormous economic, political and lifestyle changes throughout the world and especially in the United States.Al Gore has been calling for no small plans to improve Earth's environment.
NEWS
By David M. Shribman | May 4, 1999
MANCHESTER, N.H. -- The Republican presidential race has the explosive issue (abortion), the unpredictable character (Patrick J. Buchanan), the romantic insurgent (Gary Bauer), the alluring mystery man (George W. Bush), the methodical grind (Lamar Alexander), the innocent underdog (Dan Quayle), the unreconstructed warrior (John McCain), the whimsical Wunderkind (John R. Kasich) and the unconventional outsider (Elizabeth H. Dole).But it's the Democratic race, with the two boring and balding, middle-aged and moderate, respectable and responsible, pensive and pedantic guys that's really interesting.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | October 8, 1999
DES MOINES -- For the first time since Vice President Al Gore started pressing former Sen. Bill Bradley to engage in a series of debates, the two Democrats will share the same platform here tomorrow night at the Iowa party's annual Jefferson-Jackson dinner. But it won't be exactly what Mr. Gore is looking for in his new self-styled "underdog" strategy to take on the upstart challenger.The format will not be a debate, but rather a couple of speeches, with Mr. Bradley going first. That arrangement will give the vice president the opportunity to criticize what the old basketball player has to say. But it won't be the sort of direct confrontation that Mr. Gore is seeking to cut the long shot of just a few weeks ago down to size.
NEWS
By Neal Peirce | August 24, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Al Gore promised lots of choices in his acceptance speech to the Democratic convention. Women, he said, would be assured, through his Supreme Court appointments, the right to choose on abortion. A Gore administration would "give more power back to parents," by letting them choose the entertainment they want for their children. But on one issue -- vouchers to let parents choose schools for their children -- Mr. Gore was fervidly anti-choice. Everyone knows why -- Mr. Gore's deep reliance on the politically potent teacher unions, the National Education Association (NEA)
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 20, 2002
WASHINGTON -- On the heels of former Vice President Al Gore's latest public re-emergence, members of the Democratic National Committee, responding to a Los Angeles Times poll, are distinctly cool to the prospect of his seeking the party's presidential nomination in 2004. While he is the front-runner among the 312 DNC members surveyed, he is barely so, being named by 19 percent to 18 percent for Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts and 13 percent for Sen. John Edwards of North Carolina, among a field of 10 possible hopefuls listed.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 23, 2002
WASHINGTON -- After months of quietly moving around in the shadows of politics, former Vice President Al Gore will surface in Nashville on Feb. 2 for a big fund-raising rally in a downtown hotel for the Tennessee Democratic Party. Many of his supporters will say it's about time. In a sense, Mr. Gore will be doing no more than what he said he would be doing when he made his graceful exit from the political stage via television on Dec. 13, 2000: "spend time in Tennessee and mend some fences, literally and figuratively."
NEWS
By George F. Will | May 2, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Bill Bradley's new best friends, whose numbers grow exponentially as his poll numbers progress arithmetically, say he will campaign on big ideas. But right now Mr. Bradley should not distract attention from Vice President Al Gore, whose difficulties multiply. And Mr. Bradley's recent foray into the politics of ideas did not make sensible people impatient for his next foray.Mr. Gore knows that serving vice presidents who have wanted their parties' nominations have succeeded recently (Richard Nixon in 1960, Hubert Humphrey in 1968, George Bush in 1988)
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