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Gore Vidal

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By Jonathan Raban and Jonathan Raban,Los Angeles Times | June 6, 1993
UNITED STATES: ESSAYS,1952-1992.Gore Vidal.Random House.$ 1,312 pages. $37.50. Gore Vidal the novelist's best character is Gore Vidal the essayist. Beside him even Myra Breckenridge seems a pale creation, and this great fat book, chronicling 40 years of the essayist's adventures, is like a lively picaresque novel in reverse.Its hero starts out as a wickedly clever but world-weary 26-year-old: between the inauguration of Eisenhower ("The Great Golfer") and the election of Bill Clinton (sobriquet still to come)
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2012
Some of you have been generous enough to inform me, here or on Facebook or at Twitter, that you do not share my esteem for the writings of Gore Vidal. You perhaps do not care for his politics or his prose style or his morality or his person. Perhaps his patrician hauteur irritates you; I'm sure that he would have wanted it that way. That's as it should be, rather than the bland, stagnant world we would live in if all our tastes agreed. That said, I'm about to quote him, so clear out. Everyone else can stay.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | September 10, 2000
Gore Vidal, long the naughtiest boy of American literature, has in his 75th year become an almost warmly wise man -- maybe even a grown-up. With "The Golden Age"(Doubleday, 467 pages, $27.50), he has completed "The American Chronicles," his seven-volume exploration of the character and history of two centuries of the United States, presented in historical novels. It is a splendid work. With this publication by Doubleday, Vintage will release a paperback reissue of the preceding books: "Burr"(1973)
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | November 4, 2008
Election night finally arrives, and virtually all of the major networks and cable channels are blowing out all other programming to bring viewers the historic election results live. The major networks - ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox - will all have live coverage starting at 7. ABC News has been the most watched news operation for political coverage this year, but since the national conventions, CBS News has been the most aggressive. The 24/7 cable channels will start their election specials an hour earlier on MSNBC and CNN. If you are looking for some razzle-dazzle technology, CNN is using hologram photography to "transport" images of correspondents from remote locations.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | October 8, 1995
Gore Vidal has written an engaging, repellent, lyric, tasteless, irresistible book about his 70-year life. At one point early on in 'Palimpsest: A Memoir' (Random House. 435 pages. $27.50), he describes himself as 'rude but with an awful, studied graciousness.' He's got it.Throughout, he insists he is writing a memoir, not an autobiography. The latter, he asserts, would require including and checking facts, behaving in a scholarly manner. A memoir, in contrast, may rely mainly on memory. The title expresses his book's process and the effect.
NEWS
May 12, 1996
"Palimpsest." by Gore Vidal. He calls it a memoir, not an autobiography. He takes great delight in setting everybody straight. It's very amusing - with vignettes about all kinds of famous people.Oh, it's a gossipy little thing, I'd recommend it if you happen to be interested in the 1950s and 1960s world of sophistication.- Nona Porter, a first-grade teacher at Grace and St. Peter's school in Baltimore. She is a mother of five and grandmother of nine children.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler | September 10, 1991
H.L. MENCKEN'S diaries are still kicking up dust. Gore Vidal comes to a spirtied defense of Mencken in the Nation of Aug. 26-Sept.2. Mencken might have been politically correct by today's standards, Vidal writes, but even the use of the word "race" today in the U.S. is "considered a priori proof of the user's racism."Incidentally, Vidal reminds us that in 1930 Mencken predicted that communism "will probably disappear altogether when the Russian experiment comes to a climax, and Bolshevism either converts itself into a sickly imitation of capitalism or blows up with a bang.
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to The Sun | June 18, 1995
"The City And The Pillar and Seven Early Stories," by Gore Vidal. 336 pages. New York: Random House. $24When "The City And The Pillar" was first published in 1948, it was called "obscene." The New York Times refused to advertise it. What was reasonably certain to be the brilliant political career of its 20-year-old author, Gore Vidal, came to an end, to his senator grandfather's sorrow. In a new preface to this novel, which has been in print for 50 years, Mr. Vidal explains: "in certain notorious lives there is sometimes an abrupt moment of choice."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1995
It's a showdown at the 10 o'clock corral tonight as "Murder One" takes up its regular position on ABC opposite "ER," last season's powerhouse on NBC.* "New York Undercover" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Eartha Kitt makes a guest appearance, as J. C. and Eddie (Malik Yoba and Michael DeLorenzo) go undercover in a Harlem high school where a murder has taken place.Supermodel Naomi Campbell also joins the cast for six episodes a book editor interested in J. C. Fox.* "New York News" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1996
Happy 187th, Mr. Lincoln.* "The American Experience" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- "The Wright Stuff" is a quiet look at Wilbur and Orville Wright, who took time from their jobs making bicycles to invent the airplane. Not the best or most enthralling "American Experience," it's still interesting stuff. PBS.* "Partners" (9:30 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- In a sweeps week coup that can't be making NBC happy, Jennifer Aniston of "Friends" shows up as a new girlfriend who asks Bob (Jon Cryer)
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | September 10, 2000
Gore Vidal, long the naughtiest boy of American literature, has in his 75th year become an almost warmly wise man -- maybe even a grown-up. With "The Golden Age"(Doubleday, 467 pages, $27.50), he has completed "The American Chronicles," his seven-volume exploration of the character and history of two centuries of the United States, presented in historical novels. It is a splendid work. With this publication by Doubleday, Vintage will release a paperback reissue of the preceding books: "Burr"(1973)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | May 7, 2000
I cannot insist on credible objectivity in talking about William F. Buckley Jr. I have known him, professionally and personally, for many years. I have eaten at his generous and provident table, and he has graced mine. I confess: Buckley is a pal. I have read his work -- though far from all of that immense output -- from the first rock he pitched into the American intellectual pond, "God and Man at Yale," in 1951. But meanwhile, in my writing over the last 30 years I have more often differed with Buckley than agreed with him. That said, I believe that Bill Buckley's work has been the most intelligently argued, provocatively presented, morally grounded and ethically instructed catalyst to serious thought in America in the second half of the 20th century.
NEWS
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | March 1, 1998
"The Smithsonian Institution," by Gore Vidal. New York: Random House. 265 pages. $23.The science of physics has become a playful literary device for writers from Alan Lightman to Martin Amis. Now Gore Vidal toys with time and space, not to mention American history, in his whimsical novel "The Smithsonian Institution."Vidal's unveiling of the secret life of the Smithsonian, founded in 1846 with money bequeathed by James Smithson, is a delightful and occasionally thought-provoking romp through the personalities of America's past.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | February 17, 1998
NEW YORK -- If people paid for documents they download from the Internet, Hugh Gallagher would have been a best-selling writer long ago.For almost a decade now, his best-known work has been a short essay enclosed with his application to New York University. "The Wonder Years" -- better known as "The Mother of All Application Essays" -- has been published in Harper's, read on National Public Radio and acclaimed as an Internet classic. The Essay is still so vivid in people's memories that the New York Times included an excerpt in a recent front-page article on college applications.
NEWS
May 12, 1996
"Palimpsest." by Gore Vidal. He calls it a memoir, not an autobiography. He takes great delight in setting everybody straight. It's very amusing - with vignettes about all kinds of famous people.Oh, it's a gossipy little thing, I'd recommend it if you happen to be interested in the 1950s and 1960s world of sophistication.- Nona Porter, a first-grade teacher at Grace and St. Peter's school in Baltimore. She is a mother of five and grandmother of nine children.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1996
Happy 187th, Mr. Lincoln.* "The American Experience" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- "The Wright Stuff" is a quiet look at Wilbur and Orville Wright, who took time from their jobs making bicycles to invent the airplane. Not the best or most enthralling "American Experience," it's still interesting stuff. PBS.* "Partners" (9:30 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- In a sweeps week coup that can't be making NBC happy, Jennifer Aniston of "Friends" shows up as a new girlfriend who asks Bob (Jon Cryer)
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2012
Some of you have been generous enough to inform me, here or on Facebook or at Twitter, that you do not share my esteem for the writings of Gore Vidal. You perhaps do not care for his politics or his prose style or his morality or his person. Perhaps his patrician hauteur irritates you; I'm sure that he would have wanted it that way. That's as it should be, rather than the bland, stagnant world we would live in if all our tastes agreed. That said, I'm about to quote him, so clear out. Everyone else can stay.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | October 2, 1990
The Smithsonian Institution and the Maryland-based Discovery cable channel team up to launch a new series tonight. And it's a nice little addition to the television landscape. "Invention," which debuts at 9:30 tonight on the Discovery Channel, celebrates the spirit of innovation and imagination put to practical use in American life. What makes the pilot work is the combination of snappy visuals, solid scholarship, respect for imagination, a healthy irreverence and an understanding that the line between genius and crackpot is often a very thin one when it comes to new ideas.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1995
It's a showdown at the 10 o'clock corral tonight as "Murder One" takes up its regular position on ABC opposite "ER," last season's powerhouse on NBC.* "New York Undercover" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Eartha Kitt makes a guest appearance, as J. C. and Eddie (Malik Yoba and Michael DeLorenzo) go undercover in a Harlem high school where a murder has taken place.Supermodel Naomi Campbell also joins the cast for six episodes a book editor interested in J. C. Fox.* "New York News" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13)
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | October 8, 1995
Gore Vidal has written an engaging, repellent, lyric, tasteless, irresistible book about his 70-year life. At one point early on in 'Palimpsest: A Memoir' (Random House. 435 pages. $27.50), he describes himself as 'rude but with an awful, studied graciousness.' He's got it.Throughout, he insists he is writing a memoir, not an autobiography. The latter, he asserts, would require including and checking facts, behaving in a scholarly manner. A memoir, in contrast, may rely mainly on memory. The title expresses his book's process and the effect.
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