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By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2000
A Colorado surgeon has sued the makers of Gore-Tex, alleging the company stole his idea to use the wind-resistant material in artificial arteries. Dr. Glenn Kelly, former chief of vascular surgery at Denver Health Medical Center and now a private-practice surgeon in Englewood, is asking a Colorado federal court to award him all profits W.L. Gore & Associates has earned from medical uses of Gore-Tex since 1972. That was the year Kelly successfully implanted a Gore-Tex blood vessel in a dog. Although privately held W.L. Gore & Associates is based in Newark, Del., it employs about 1,900 - roughly one-third of its entire work force - at its plants in Elkton, in Cecil County.
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NEWS
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2003
"I wish I knew it was going to be this warm," Mark Newton says in his far-from-home British accent. The Blue Ridge Mountains have broken out in their seasonal rash of autumnal colors, but the thermometer reads almost sixty today. Newton pauses under a canopy of trees to remove his backpack, then whips off his hiking hat and tucks it inside. He sheds a T-shirt, leaving only his nylon pullover. He is sweating heavily, something he takes very seriously, as if his skin has sprung a leak. Highly inefficient.
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BUSINESS
By Debbie M. Price and Debbie M. Price,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1997
Bullets of water pelt down, gusts of wind whip and tear from all sides. This is a gale in the open ocean, a monsoon, a raging hurricane the likes of which are seen, well, several times a day.This is the rain room at the W. L. Gore & Associates facility near Elkton in Cecil County, where Gore-Tex parkas and pants earn their labels and super-serious product testing meets marketing genius, head on."If it doesn't say Gore-Tex, it's not," the company's recent advertising campaign proclaims.Behind that slogan are rigorous standards and years of product development, as well as the tacit acknowledgment that even as Gore commands 90 percent of the market for waterproof, breathable fabrics, competitors are appearing on the horizon.
BUSINESS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2000
A Colorado surgeon has sued the makers of Gore-Tex, alleging the company stole his idea to use the wind-resistant material in artificial arteries. Dr. Glenn Kelly, former chief of vascular surgery at Denver Health Medical Center and now a private-practice surgeon in Englewood, is asking a Colorado federal court to award him all profits W.L. Gore & Associates has earned from medical uses of Gore-Tex since 1972. That was the year Kelly successfully implanted a Gore-Tex blood vessel in a dog. Although privately held W.L. Gore & Associates is based in Newark, Del., it employs about 1,900 - roughly one-third of its entire work force - at its plants in Elkton, in Cecil County.
BUSINESS
By Debbie M. Price and Debbie M. Price,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1997
Bullets of water pelt down, gusts of wind whip and tear from all sides. This is a gale in the open ocean, a monsoon, a raging hurricane the likes of which are seen, well, several times a day.This is the rain room at the W. L. Gore & Associates facility near Elkton in Cecil County, where Gore-Tex parkas and pants earn their labels and super-serious product testing meets marketing genius, head on."If it doesn't say Gore-Tex, it's not," the company's recent advertising campaign proclaims.Behind that slogan are rigorous standards and years of product development, as well as the tacit acknowledgment that even as Gore commands 90 percent of the market for waterproof, breathable fabrics, competitors are appearing on the horizon.
NEWS
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2003
"I wish I knew it was going to be this warm," Mark Newton says in his far-from-home British accent. The Blue Ridge Mountains have broken out in their seasonal rash of autumnal colors, but the thermometer reads almost sixty today. Newton pauses under a canopy of trees to remove his backpack, then whips off his hiking hat and tucks it inside. He sheds a T-shirt, leaving only his nylon pullover. He is sweating heavily, something he takes very seriously, as if his skin has sprung a leak. Highly inefficient.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Staff | June 20, 1999
HARPERS FERRY, W. Va. -- Larry Luxenberg thinks it's a shame people can't see Emma Gatewood's shower curtain. Or Gene Espy's 40-year-old wool socks.For Luxenberg, an author, New York financial adviser and passionate hiker, these everyday items are sacred icons of the sport he loves. He wants to display them and other historic hiking artifacts in a museum near the Appalachian Trail Conference headquarters in this historic town.Such a museum, he says, would honor people like Gatewood and Espy, who found pleasure in putting one foot in front of the other, and, perhaps, inspire folks who believe the great outdoors is the space between their car and the office to, well, take a hike.
NEWS
January 22, 2005
Genevieve "Vieve" Gore, 91, who co-founded the company that invented Gore-Tex fabric, which is used for waterproofing clothing, has died.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1999
Mild winters and fluctuations in the outdoor clothing market led to the layoffs of between 100 and 130 employees at three W. L. Gore & Associates plants in Elkton, the company said yesterday.All of the employees worked in the Newark, Del., company's consumer fabrics division, which is best known for making Gore-Tex, a high-tech waterproof fabric that wicks moisture from the body."The last couple of winters have been warm and that has affected our business," said Lisa King, a Gore spokeswoman in Delaware.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2007
Certifications David R. Bogus of the accounting and consulting firm Ellin & Tucker has been certified as an accredited senior appraiser by the American Society of Appraisers. Contracts Vericom Technologies Inc., a Columbia-based firm, has been selected by Guardian Cos. of Delaware to provide mobile resource management solutions. New clients Warschawski has been named as the national agency of record for W.L. Gore & Associates, makers of Gore-Tex and Windstopper products. New name I4 Commerce, a Timonium-based alternative payment service, changed its name to Bill Me Later Inc. The service lets shoppers make purchases without using a credit card and be billed at a later date.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Staff | June 20, 1999
HARPERS FERRY, W. Va. -- Larry Luxenberg thinks it's a shame people can't see Emma Gatewood's shower curtain. Or Gene Espy's 40-year-old wool socks.For Luxenberg, an author, New York financial adviser and passionate hiker, these everyday items are sacred icons of the sport he loves. He wants to display them and other historic hiking artifacts in a museum near the Appalachian Trail Conference headquarters in this historic town.Such a museum, he says, would honor people like Gatewood and Espy, who found pleasure in putting one foot in front of the other, and, perhaps, inspire folks who believe the great outdoors is the space between their car and the office to, well, take a hike.
BUSINESS
By Debbie M. Price and Debbie M. Price,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1997
Bullets of water pelt down, gusts of wind whip and tear from all sides. This is a gale in the open ocean, a monsoon, a raging hurricane the likes of which are seen, well, several times a day.This is the rain room at the W. L. Gore & Associates facility near Elkton in Cecil County, where Gore-Tex parkas and pants earn their labels and super-serious product testing meets marketing genius, head on."If it doesn't say Gore-Tex, it's not," the company's recent advertising campaign proclaims.Behind that slogan are rigorous standards and years of product development, as well as the tacit acknowledgment that even as Gore commands 90 percent of the market for waterproof, breathable fabrics, competitors are appearing on the horizon.
BUSINESS
By Debbie M. Price and Debbie M. Price,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1997
Bullets of water pelt down, gusts of wind whip and tear from all sides. This is a gale in the open ocean, a monsoon, a raging hurricane the likes of which are seen, well, several times a day.This is the rain room at the W. L. Gore & Associates facility near Elkton in Cecil County, where Gore-Tex parkas and pants earn their labels and super-serious product testing meets marketing genius, head on."If it doesn't say Gore-Tex, it's not," the company's recent advertising campaign proclaims.Behind that slogan are rigorous standards and years of product development, as well as the tacit acknowledgment that even as Gore commands 90 percent of the market for waterproof, breathable fabrics, competitors are appearing on the horizon.
FEATURES
By Barry Meier and Barry Meier,N.Y. Times News Service | November 21, 1990
Parkas, shells and other rugged outdoor wear are supposed to be part of the simple life. But increasingly, buying such clothing is anything but simple.Tags boasting of various fabric treatments read like primers in fluid mechanics.More and more synthetics, all competitors to down, are on the scene, many with strange-sounding names.And with some specially treated shells priced at $400 or more, it's not too hard for a bewildered shopper to end up buying a garment more suited to an assault on Mount Everest than a weekend walk.
FEATURES
By N.Y. Times News Service | November 21, 1990
Trapped air keeps a body warm. And wearing layers of clothes creates additional air traps.Few people know that better than researchers at the U.S. Army Research and Development Engineering Center in Natick, Mass. their job to design uniforms for soldiers to wear in both extremely warm and cold conditions.Just in case you plan to spend a lot of time outdoors this winter, here are the center's recommendations for the layers of clothing you can put on to stay comfortable at temperatures ranging from degrees above zero to 60 below.
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