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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
Visa's new Olympic-themed ad starring Michael Phelps just might give America a case of the shivers. Fair warning. First of all, it's got the voice of Morgan Freeman who can induce goosebumps by reading the telephone book. But the film-work is also quite stunning, illustrating the concept of one hundredth of a second -- the amount of time that allowed Phelps to bring eight medals home from the 2008 Olympics. "One hundredth of a second is faster than the blink of an eye," Freeman says.
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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
Visa's new Olympic-themed ad starring Michael Phelps just might give America a case of the shivers. Fair warning. First of all, it's got the voice of Morgan Freeman who can induce goosebumps by reading the telephone book. But the film-work is also quite stunning, illustrating the concept of one hundredth of a second -- the amount of time that allowed Phelps to bring eight medals home from the 2008 Olympics. "One hundredth of a second is faster than the blink of an eye," Freeman says.
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1995
The Fox network previews a new kids' anthology show tonight, Mary Tyler Moore is on "Dateline NBC," and the offbeat comedy troupe known as The State, from MTV, breaks into network prime time with a Halloween special.* "Goosebumps: The Haunted Mask" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- An hour-long special launches an anthology series to air regularly on Friday afternoons. Based on the children's book series by R. L. Stine, the first edition tells the story of a young girl who dons a mask to scare the boys who humiliated her. Fox.* "Dateline NBC" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11)
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | November 29, 2007
The first time Ben Heppner encountered opera - on a television broadcast when he was growing up in Western Canada - it all sounded totally alien. Years later, he not only got over that initial impression, but found himself hailed as one of the greatest gifts to the world of opera in a long, long time. If you go Ben Heppner, accompanied by pianist Thomas Muraco, will give a recital at 5:30 p.m. Sunday at Shriver Hall, the Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St. Tickets are $19 and $39. Call 410-516-7164 or go to shriverconcerts.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 17, 1996
Personally, I'd much rather watch the Orioles than the Miss Universe pageant, but if you absolutely cannot miss this annual fleshfest, check out Washington's WUSA, Channel 9, at 9 p.m. Otherwise, watch dem O's play Seattle on WJZ, Channel 13, at 7: 35 p.m. or select from these other choice viewing morsels."
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By Janis Campbell | December 14, 1998
Here's a fact that will give you goosebumps: Author R.L. Stine writes two books a month. For anyone who has ever toiled over a book report or school paper, the idea is alarming. For more than five years, he's been writing two books a month, one for "Goosebumps" and one for "Fear Street," his scary series for teen readers.Writing has always come easy to the world's best-selling children's book author. He started writing when he was a kid in Ohio. He spent hours at a typewriter, tapping out funny stories and joke books to hand out at school.
FEATURES
By Lesly Borge and Lesly Borge,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | November 6, 1998
Since the onset of the "Goosebumps" children's book craze in 1992, there have been "Goosebumps" videos, a "Goosebumps" TV series and "Goosebumps" paraphernalia from T-shirts and bookmarks to flashlights and key chains. Now there's a "Goosebumps" play, and it comes to Baltimore tomorrow.If you're one of the millions of fans of the "Goosebumps" series, then you already know how funny and fantastic these stories by R.L. Stine are. More than 250 million of the series' 160 books have sold since 1992.
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By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1995
NEW YORK -- R.L. Stine, the most successful horror writer you've never heard of, is dressed in black today, trying to live up to his terrifying reputation. It's a tricky act for a nice Midwestern guy with glasses, receding hairline and a pleasant smile.And it's not even close to his young fans' expectations, which run toward a monstrous visage -- maybe one more eye, or a few less teeth. But you have to work with what you've got, and in Mr. Stine's case, that's black clothes, a plastic skeleton he keeps in his office and his shadowy initials.
NEWS
December 27, 1998
R. L. Stine, author of the popular "Goosebumps" series, will chat with his fans next month during an online event planned by The Read In! -- a national program that sponsors an annual reading celebration through cyberspace.On Jan. 13, Stine will "speak" with pupils in 1,000 classrooms across the country from a virtual haunted house based on his novels -- a site that pupils can explore during the session.The event is one of the 11 monthly discussion programs leading to the sixth National Read In Day on May 13, when pupils in participating schools can spend the day communicating online with more than 25 authors.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2005
STORRS, Conn. - Josh Boone leads No. 19 Connecticut in points, rebounds, shooting, blocked shots and minutes. It's a safe bet the sophomore center from Mount Airy is also the Huskies' ace at Texas Hold 'em, because he does it all with a poker face. "Every day, I ask Josh how's he feeling," UConn coach Jim Calhoun said. "He always says, `OK.' I finally told him, `One of these days, you're going to surprise me and say, `Great!' He's got this woe-is-me look about him. He doesn't expect anything negative to happen, but he looks like a coach.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2005
STORRS, Conn. - Josh Boone leads No. 19 Connecticut in points, rebounds, shooting, blocked shots and minutes. It's a safe bet the sophomore center from Mount Airy is also the Huskies' ace at Texas Hold 'em, because he does it all with a poker face. "Every day, I ask Josh how's he feeling," UConn coach Jim Calhoun said. "He always says, `OK.' I finally told him, `One of these days, you're going to surprise me and say, `Great!' He's got this woe-is-me look about him. He doesn't expect anything negative to happen, but he looks like a coach.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2001
EASTON - It's Thanksgiving week, and the venerable Tidewater Inn here in the heart of the Talbot County seat is booked solid. Guests are arriving from all over the East Coast, and the staff is reviving a hotel favorite - the 4:30 a.m. breakfast buffet. Across Harrison Street, gun shop owner Larry Albright has extended his hours and will open the store on a Sunday for the first time in years. Down in Trappe, outfitter Bo Kennedy is dressed head to foot in camouflage and tramping around 2,000 acres of leased farmland and marsh, waiting.
NEWS
December 27, 1998
R. L. Stine, author of the popular "Goosebumps" series, will chat with his fans next month during an online event planned by The Read In! -- a national program that sponsors an annual reading celebration through cyberspace.On Jan. 13, Stine will "speak" with pupils in 1,000 classrooms across the country from a virtual haunted house based on his novels -- a site that pupils can explore during the session.The event is one of the 11 monthly discussion programs leading to the sixth National Read In Day on May 13, when pupils in participating schools can spend the day communicating online with more than 25 authors.
FEATURES
By Janis Campbell | December 14, 1998
Here's a fact that will give you goosebumps: Author R.L. Stine writes two books a month. For anyone who has ever toiled over a book report or school paper, the idea is alarming. For more than five years, he's been writing two books a month, one for "Goosebumps" and one for "Fear Street," his scary series for teen readers.Writing has always come easy to the world's best-selling children's book author. He started writing when he was a kid in Ohio. He spent hours at a typewriter, tapping out funny stories and joke books to hand out at school.
FEATURES
By Lesly Borge and Lesly Borge,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | November 6, 1998
Since the onset of the "Goosebumps" children's book craze in 1992, there have been "Goosebumps" videos, a "Goosebumps" TV series and "Goosebumps" paraphernalia from T-shirts and bookmarks to flashlights and key chains. Now there's a "Goosebumps" play, and it comes to Baltimore tomorrow.If you're one of the millions of fans of the "Goosebumps" series, then you already know how funny and fantastic these stories by R.L. Stine are. More than 250 million of the series' 160 books have sold since 1992.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 17, 1996
Personally, I'd much rather watch the Orioles than the Miss Universe pageant, but if you absolutely cannot miss this annual fleshfest, check out Washington's WUSA, Channel 9, at 9 p.m. Otherwise, watch dem O's play Seattle on WJZ, Channel 13, at 7: 35 p.m. or select from these other choice viewing morsels."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | November 29, 2007
The first time Ben Heppner encountered opera - on a television broadcast when he was growing up in Western Canada - it all sounded totally alien. Years later, he not only got over that initial impression, but found himself hailed as one of the greatest gifts to the world of opera in a long, long time. If you go Ben Heppner, accompanied by pianist Thomas Muraco, will give a recital at 5:30 p.m. Sunday at Shriver Hall, the Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St. Tickets are $19 and $39. Call 410-516-7164 or go to shriverconcerts.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Staff Writer | October 22, 1993
Gory books are in their glory. Middle schoolers can't seem to get enough of gruesome tales that give their parents the creeps."It's like Halloween all year long," said Debbie Taylor, coordinator of services for children and youth at the Enoch Pratt Free Library.Ms. Taylor is on an American Library Association committee that is compiling a list of popular horror genre books. She sees two reasons for their appeal."First, they're written almost like a movie script; they're full of action," she said.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1995
NEW YORK -- R.L. Stine, the most successful horror writer you've never heard of, is dressed in black today, trying to live up to his terrifying reputation. It's a tricky act for a nice Midwestern guy with glasses, receding hairline and a pleasant smile.And it's not even close to his young fans' expectations, which run toward a monstrous visage -- maybe one more eye, or a few less teeth. But you have to work with what you've got, and in Mr. Stine's case, that's black clothes, a plastic skeleton he keeps in his office and his shadowy initials.
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