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By PETER BAKER | March 7, 1993
A couple of weeks ago, at a Department of Natural Resources workshop held to discuss proposed hunting seasons for 1993-94, the subject of goose hunting came up.At the time, the reporters in attendance were speculating that the fall and winter season could be as short as 30 days with aone-bird daily limit throughout.DNR's decision on Friday to seek a season on migratory Canada geese as short as 18 days, caught a lot of people by surprise. And the cry has gone up that this is the end of the goose hunting industry on the Eastern Shore.
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By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
When the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association wrestling tournament kicks off Thursday at Mount St. Joseph, McDonogh senior Kevin Marvel is facing his last chance to make his three-dimensional dream come true. Ever since Marvel arrived at the school from his home in Easton he has strived to win an MIAA title, a Maryland Independent School title and a National Preps title. Along with those personal goals, he wants to help No. 1 McDonogh win the MIAA and MIS team titles for the first time since 2008.
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SPORTS
March 21, 1993
EASTON -- Some 150 people gathered at Easton High School last Thursday night for the Department of Natural Resources' Wildlife Division public meetings on proposed hunting seasons for 1993-1994. Fully a third of those in attendance were vitally interested in the dates and limits proposed for migratory Canada geese.Yes, they were told, in a worst-case scenario the season would be as short as 18 days with a one-bird limit. At best, the season might be as long as 30 days with a one-bird limit.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2004
Federal officials yesterday said they will ease restrictions on hunting the migratory Canada goose population - a potential big boost to the Eastern Shore's fall economy. The decision comes a decade after the imposition of a complete ban on hunting migratory Canada geese, in a bid to save the dwindling population. The ban was lifted in 2001, but with hunters limited to one bird a day. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials yesterday confirmed that the Atlantic Flyway goose population, which breeds in northern Canada and spends winters here, has rebounded to levels not seen since 1988.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2003
EASTON - The bird that was once King of the Eastern Shore has returned to its exalted perch. Early tomorrow morning, hundreds of hunters will camp out on the edges of marshes, fields and ponds, poised with shotguns to resume a tradition that helps define life on the Eastern Shore: goose hunting. That's a marked change from the situation less than a decade ago, when state and federal officials were so alarmed by the dwindling migratory Canada goose population that they banned all hunting of the geese.
NEWS
August 6, 1995
After years of heeding the cries of economic interests that profit from an extended goose hunting season, wildlife officials have finally heeded the mournful call of the disappearing Canada goose. The bitter decision to cancel this fall's Canada goose hunting season in Maryland and the rest of the Atlantic Flyway may save the migratory goose population from the point of collapse, even as it wipes out an important seasonal income for the Eastern Shore.Waterfowl experts have warned for several years that wild goose flocks are declining.
NEWS
August 28, 1999
A RESURGENCE in the numbers of migratory Canada geese over the past four years has prompted the state (and Atlantic region) to again open hunting season on the waterfowl that is our state bird.The hunting hiatus allowed the closely monitored goose population to jump from 29,000 nesting pairs in 1995 to 77,500 pairs this year at their summer home on Quebec's Ungava Peninsula. Biologists say limiting hunters to shooting no more than 5 percent of the migrating population will allow the Canada goose numbers to continue to grow robustly.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | December 11, 1994
At midday recently along a tidal gut on the Eastern Shore, waterfowl hunting guide Dennis Dunn made his way around a thicket and edged downhill toward the shoreline. Dry leaves rustled, a dead branch snapped underfoot and a few hundred Canada geese noisily took flight."Beautiful. But it ain't nothing like it used to be," Dunn said wistfully as the geese arced away to the northwest and their honks reverberated across the marsh."When I lived out by open water, there were rafts of geese as far as you could see. A powerboat would pass through them heading for [Kent]
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | November 28, 1993
SHOWSSaturday: R. Madison Mitchell Chapter of Ducks Unlimited annual benefit dinner-auction at the Chesapeake Club on Aberdeen Proving Grounds, 6 p.m. Live auction, silent auction, raffles, door prizes.Dec. 11-12: Gun and knife show sponsored by Camrod Hunting Club, Putty Hill Shopping Center, Parkville, 9 a.m. both days. Admission is $4.FISHINGThrough Tuesday: Fall rockfish season for charterboat and recreational anglers in Maryland's Atlantic coastal waters and tributaries. 28-inch minimum, no maximum.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2001
EASTON - It's Thanksgiving week, and the venerable Tidewater Inn here in the heart of the Talbot County seat is booked solid. Guests are arriving from all over the East Coast, and the staff is reviving a hotel favorite - the 4:30 a.m. breakfast buffet. Across Harrison Street, gun shop owner Larry Albright has extended his hours and will open the store on a Sunday for the first time in years. Down in Trappe, outfitter Bo Kennedy is dressed head to foot in camouflage and tramping around 2,000 acres of leased farmland and marsh, waiting.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2003
EASTON - The bird that was once King of the Eastern Shore has returned to its exalted perch. Early tomorrow morning, hundreds of hunters will camp out on the edges of marshes, fields and ponds, poised with shotguns to resume a tradition that helps define life on the Eastern Shore: goose hunting. That's a marked change from the situation less than a decade ago, when state and federal officials were so alarmed by the dwindling migratory Canada goose population that they banned all hunting of the geese.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2001
EASTON - It's Thanksgiving week, and the venerable Tidewater Inn here in the heart of the Talbot County seat is booked solid. Guests are arriving from all over the East Coast, and the staff is reviving a hotel favorite - the 4:30 a.m. breakfast buffet. Across Harrison Street, gun shop owner Larry Albright has extended his hours and will open the store on a Sunday for the first time in years. Down in Trappe, outfitter Bo Kennedy is dressed head to foot in camouflage and tramping around 2,000 acres of leased farmland and marsh, waiting.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | September 2, 2001
Every so often, a letter or e-mail arrives that allows ye olde outdoors writer (YOOW) to pass along some advice gathered from the experts. Quentin Sedney sent me a note in June that I saved for hunting season: "For some time now I have intended to get back into something I did as a youngster - hunting. When I was about 12, I began helping an elderly neighbor repair his decoys in the summer, and place them in the early fall on a farm in Kent County. "He taught me how to handle myself around guns and we did well goose hunting [we tried deer hunting a couple of times, but his age did not allow us much time and we never had any luck]
NEWS
August 27, 2001
Policies on the earth belie conservatives' claim to respect life After reading "Sick earth needs attention" by Bob Musil (Opinion Commentary, Aug. 16), I was struck by the irony of George Will's column on the same page lauding President Bush's sense of the sanctity of life and nature and his party's principled approach to stem cell research and other biological quandaries ("A principled solution to stem cell dilemma," Opinion Commentary, Aug. 16). The ethical outlook of conservatives seems to be this: It's wrong to destroy life when it is two cells in a petri dish, but OK to destroy the lives of those destined to die from asthma and other diseases resulting from increased air pollutants.
NEWS
August 28, 1999
A RESURGENCE in the numbers of migratory Canada geese over the past four years has prompted the state (and Atlantic region) to again open hunting season on the waterfowl that is our state bird.The hunting hiatus allowed the closely monitored goose population to jump from 29,000 nesting pairs in 1995 to 77,500 pairs this year at their summer home on Quebec's Ungava Peninsula. Biologists say limiting hunters to shooting no more than 5 percent of the migrating population will allow the Canada goose numbers to continue to grow robustly.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1996
MARYLAND NATURAL Resources policeman Ray Harner is making his early season rounds through the heart of the best goose hunting the Chesapeake region has to offer these days:Hagerstown. Boonsboro. Burkittsville.Forget the Eastern Shore, Kent County cornfields, Dorchester County marshes and hunting blinds along the Choptank and Chester.Think, rather, of Washington and Frederick counties, the golf courses and farm ponds of the sinuous upper Potomac and little trout streams like Beaver Creek.The latter are where the goose action is these days.
NEWS
November 13, 1993
Maryland's goose hunting season opens Nov. 22 in a test of man's ability to predict nature's fickle course and to effectively husband this magnificent natural resource.The Canada goose season is longer and has a higher bag limit than state wildlife managers believe is advisable, following eight below-average reproduction seasons in Quebec's nesting grounds and the lowest head count in 30 years. In recent seasons, 95 percent of the kill have been adult geese needed for breeding and population recovery.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | December 5, 1993
In September, Maryland held its first hunting season for resident Canada geese in the counties west of the Chesapeake Bay, and over the next two years the experimental season will continue.Judging from a report prepared by Bill Harvey, Waterfowl Project Leader for the state Department of Natural Resources, this year's early goose hunt had good and bad points.From the standpoint of some hunters, the season was held during weather considered too warm for goose hunting, hunt areas were hard to find and little public land that held geese was available.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | August 13, 1995
Hunters, farmers and biologists gathered in Wye Mills Thursday night to discuss the collapse of goose hunting and the price that will have to be paid to save its future. In both cases, the costs are difficult to determine.The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said 10 days ago that hunting seasons for migratory Canada geese will be closed in Maryland and the 13 coastal states of the Atlantic Flyway for at least this season. Last week, Canada closed its hunting seasons for these waterfowl in Quebec and portions of Ontario.
NEWS
August 6, 1995
After years of heeding the cries of economic interests that profit from an extended goose hunting season, wildlife officials have finally heeded the mournful call of the disappearing Canada goose. The bitter decision to cancel this fall's Canada goose hunting season in Maryland and the rest of the Atlantic Flyway may save the migratory goose population from the point of collapse, even as it wipes out an important seasonal income for the Eastern Shore.Waterfowl experts have warned for several years that wild goose flocks are declining.
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