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NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | January 31, 2010
Thousands of people braved frigid temperatures and wind-driven snow to jump into the Chesapeake Bay during the 14th annual Polar Bear Plunge - but the second of Saturday's scheduled dips in the water was canceled on doctors' orders. Organizers for the event, a fundraiser for the Maryland Special Olympics, estimated that as many as 15,000 people took quick splashes in the water, which was about 36 degrees, during the first plunge at 1 p.m. Saturday. Air temperature hovered around 23 degrees.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
COLLEGE PARK - A nearly 60-year-old basketball arena called Cole Field House was transformed into a hot, crowded, ear-deafening time capsule Friday night. It could have been 1969, the year Lefty Driesell arrived from Davidson filled with bluster and bravado and determined to make Maryland into "the UCLA of the East. " It could have been 1989, the year Gary Williams returned to his alma mater from Ohio State, vowing to rebuild a scandal-ridden, down-on-its-luck program. It could have been 2002, when the Terps won their first national championship a few weeks after closing the building with an unbeaten home season.
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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | December 23, 1993
"Goose flesh," says Webster, "is a roughened condition of the skin in which the papillae are erected by cold, fear, etc."One of the etceteras left out of the definition is "Messiah," the mega-oratorio composed by George Frederick Handel in the midst of the greatest single burst of energy in music history; a 21-day span back in the late summer of 1741.No doubt about it, the two sinfonias, 16 recitatives, 17 arias and 19 choruses that constitute "Messiah" contribute a prodigious number of bumps to the world's annual goose-flesh harvest.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | January 31, 2010
Thousands of people braved frigid temperatures and wind-driven snow to jump into the Chesapeake Bay during the 14th annual Polar Bear Plunge - but the second of Saturday's scheduled dips in the water was canceled on doctors' orders. Organizers for the event, a fundraiser for the Maryland Special Olympics, estimated that as many as 15,000 people took quick splashes in the water, which was about 36 degrees, during the first plunge at 1 p.m. Saturday. Air temperature hovered around 23 degrees.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg and John Eisenberg,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2004
Gary Stevens went to a lot of trouble to ride in the Preakness yesterday, flying in from France just to take the mount on Rock Hard Ten. He obviously thought something special might happen, and it did, but Stevens could only watch as Smarty Jones pulled away in the stretch at Pimlico Race Course to win by almost a dozen lengths. Stevens, a two-time Preakness winner, finished second on Rock Hard Ten and said that made his trip worthwhile. But what really made his day, he said, was the chance to see Smarty Jones in action.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer | September 15, 1992
If you watched the recent Olympics in Barcelona, Spain, no doubt you were impressed with the performance of runners from mountainous nations. You may have wondered why this was so.The reason: The runners' high-altitude home environments helped them become better competitive distance runners because sleeping at high altitude helps the body use oxygen more efficiently.Igor Gamow of the University of Colorado has shown you can run faster by sleeping where oxygen is sparse. When you sleep at high altitudes, you breathe oxygen-sparse air, causing your kidneys to produce large amounts of erythropoietin (EPO)
SPORTS
June 14, 1998
Quote: "I didn't know whether to go out there or not. So, you know, I asked some of the guys, 'Can I go out there?' and they said, 'Yeah, go ahead.' I kind of got goose bumps all over." -- Diamondbacks rookie Travis Lee, who drove in five runs and earned his first curtain call.It's a fact: The Marlins are 9-29 in games in which they score first.Who's hot: The Phillies' Doug Glanville is hitting .403 (25-for-62) with three home runs during a 13-game hitting streak.Who's not: The Cubs' 5-9 hitters went a combined 1-for-22 with 11 strikeouts.
NEWS
By Gene Sweeney Jr. and Gene Sweeney Jr.,Sun photographer | February 3, 2008
Last Saturday I covered the 12th annual Polar Bear Plunge, which benefits the Maryland Special Olympics, at Sandy Point State Park. Now, I grew up in Minnesota, so I am used to people doing crazy things to pass away the winter. I'm just not used to 10,000 crazy people doing the same thing. I'm told that when this event started, there were just a few people, no media and no warming tents. Now, people start to arrive at dawn, in a full array of costumes. Some even set up tail-gating parties like Ravens football fans.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | April 5, 2004
EXCELLENT SHOW, fellas. Excellent because most of the really good fun and folly between the Orioles and Red Sox took place before the third inning of the stone-cold season opener. That included Lee Mazzilli rubbing Sidney Ponson's bald head as Ponson sat at his locker, pulling on his sanitary socks, three hours before the first pitch. "Good luck," the rookie manager told his starter. Ponson smiled, looking as large and serene as Buddha. (Does Buddha drink light beer?) Mazzilli went off to find the spot on the bench closest to the space heater.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 16, 1999
Feeling punky, bunky? Bummed out about the state of the republic and the presidency? Already sick of that numbing civics lesson in Washington? There's always this: 294 men and women from 70 countries raising their hands and swearing an oath to be loyal citizens of the United States in a big, grand ceremony in a big, grand chamber in downtown Baltimore. The nation they adopted might be awash in bizarre scandal and polarizing politics, their president might be impeached, but they took the oath anyway.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | January 31, 2010
Thousands of people braved frigid temperatures and wind-driven snow to jump into the Chesapeake Bay during the 14th annual Polar Bear Plunge - but the second of Saturday's scheduled dips in the water was canceled on doctors' orders. Organizers for the event, a fundraiser for the Maryland Special Olympics, estimated that as many as 15,000 people took quick splashes in the water, which was about 36 degrees, during the first plunge at 1 p.m. Saturday. Air temperature hovered around 23 degrees.
NEWS
By Gene Sweeney Jr. and Gene Sweeney Jr.,Sun photographer | February 3, 2008
Last Saturday I covered the 12th annual Polar Bear Plunge, which benefits the Maryland Special Olympics, at Sandy Point State Park. Now, I grew up in Minnesota, so I am used to people doing crazy things to pass away the winter. I'm just not used to 10,000 crazy people doing the same thing. I'm told that when this event started, there were just a few people, no media and no warming tents. Now, people start to arrive at dawn, in a full array of costumes. Some even set up tail-gating parties like Ravens football fans.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg and John Eisenberg,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2004
Gary Stevens went to a lot of trouble to ride in the Preakness yesterday, flying in from France just to take the mount on Rock Hard Ten. He obviously thought something special might happen, and it did, but Stevens could only watch as Smarty Jones pulled away in the stretch at Pimlico Race Course to win by almost a dozen lengths. Stevens, a two-time Preakness winner, finished second on Rock Hard Ten and said that made his trip worthwhile. But what really made his day, he said, was the chance to see Smarty Jones in action.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | April 5, 2004
EXCELLENT SHOW, fellas. Excellent because most of the really good fun and folly between the Orioles and Red Sox took place before the third inning of the stone-cold season opener. That included Lee Mazzilli rubbing Sidney Ponson's bald head as Ponson sat at his locker, pulling on his sanitary socks, three hours before the first pitch. "Good luck," the rookie manager told his starter. Ponson smiled, looking as large and serene as Buddha. (Does Buddha drink light beer?) Mazzilli went off to find the spot on the bench closest to the space heater.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2001
The TV anchors are using it in their banter, it's all over sports-talk radio, and University of Maryland fans are shouting it across crowded sports bars as they clink their bottles of Bud Ice and watch their team's improbable run to the Final Four of the NCAA men's basketball tournament. We're talking here about the unofficial slogan of Terrapin fans - "Fear the turtle!" surely the hippest, funniest, most ironic in big-time college hoops today. Question: What do you do when your school has the gentle, plodding, smallish terrapin as its mascot, while seemingly every other team in the land has a larger, swifter, fiercer-looking one?
FEATURES
By MELODY HOLMES | June 30, 1999
R.L. Stine, the writer of the popular "Goosebumps" horror series, began writing in 1952 when he was 9 years old, not much older than many of his current fans. Before he began the Goosebumps series in 1992, Stine was known for his humorous children's books that included "101 Silly Monster Jokes" and "Bozos on Patrol." He was also editor of Bananas magazine.Stine remembers being a big fan of scary movies when he was a kid and he recalls those titles when he names new books in the Goosebumps series.
NEWS
December 5, 1991
The First LadyEditor: Barbara Bush has brought back dignity and warmth to the White House from whence they have been too long absent.Arthur W. Kralick.Severna Park.Punctu-What?Editor: With reference to the samples quoted of the new state report card tests accompanying the story in The Sun of Nov. 17 on changes in Maryland school testing, it was interesting to note under the reading test that students would be asked to "check carefully for correct grammar, spelling, punctualization and capitalization."
FEATURES
By MELODY HOLMES | June 30, 1999
R.L. Stine, the writer of the popular "Goosebumps" horror series, began writing in 1952 when he was 9 years old, not much older than many of his current fans. Before he began the Goosebumps series in 1992, Stine was known for his humorous children's books that included "101 Silly Monster Jokes" and "Bozos on Patrol." He was also editor of Bananas magazine.Stine remembers being a big fan of scary movies when he was a kid and he recalls those titles when he names new books in the Goosebumps series.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 16, 1999
Feeling punky, bunky? Bummed out about the state of the republic and the presidency? Already sick of that numbing civics lesson in Washington? There's always this: 294 men and women from 70 countries raising their hands and swearing an oath to be loyal citizens of the United States in a big, grand ceremony in a big, grand chamber in downtown Baltimore. The nation they adopted might be awash in bizarre scandal and polarizing politics, their president might be impeached, but they took the oath anyway.
SPORTS
June 14, 1998
Quote: "I didn't know whether to go out there or not. So, you know, I asked some of the guys, 'Can I go out there?' and they said, 'Yeah, go ahead.' I kind of got goose bumps all over." -- Diamondbacks rookie Travis Lee, who drove in five runs and earned his first curtain call.It's a fact: The Marlins are 9-29 in games in which they score first.Who's hot: The Phillies' Doug Glanville is hitting .403 (25-for-62) with three home runs during a 13-game hitting streak.Who's not: The Cubs' 5-9 hitters went a combined 1-for-22 with 11 strikeouts.
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