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By Chris Gaither and Chris Gaither,Los Angeles Times | February 11, 2007
Andre Mueller is a virtual explorer of virgin territory. One morning, the 25-year-old German physics student noticed a wispy line off the coast of Iceland in the patchwork of satellite imagery that makes up Google Earth. He zoomed in. It was smoke. At the end of the smoke trail, he discovered three boats. He slapped a "placemark," the program's version of an explorer's flag, on the location and reported his findings on Google Earth Community bulletin board. "What are these three ships doing there?"
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NEWS
By Kym Byrnes, For The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2014
If a bus-sized iron asteroid traveling at approximately 12 miles per second hit New York City, would Baltimore be spared? The answer to this and other space questions can be found in Discover Space, an interactive learning exhibit on display at the Baltimore County Public Library's Towson branch through Oct. 29. Lisa Hughes, manager of the branch on York Road, said the exhibit will appeal to patrons from elementary aged kids to seniors....
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BUSINESS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN REPORTER | August 23, 2007
Imagine having millions of stars and planets at your fingertips, without spending thousands on a telescope or shivering all night under a cold, dark sky. The universe is online, available from the comfort of your computer chair. It's a feature that Google developers, in collaboration with astronomers, have added to Google Earth, the Web site that provides millions of users with bird's-eye views of their home planet. Sky at Google Earth, which made its debut in cyberspace early yesterday, turns Googlers around and aims their eyes toward the heavens, with user-friendly tools for navigating and zooming deep into the skies of both the Northern and Southern hemispheres.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
When app developer Mindgrub Technologies outgrew its space for the umpteenth time, CEO Todd Marks did what any good tech entrepreneur would do - he turned to Google. An analysis of his employees' commutes using Google Maps and Google Earth led Marks to Locust Point, and the former Phillips Seafood headquarters. Mindgrub set up shop there three weeks ago and is set to get an official welcome from Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and a group of city small business leaders Wednesday. "We're really growing fast and we need to attract a lot of talent," Marks said, adding that many of the young professionals Mindgrub is seeking to recruit already live in the city and want to stay there.
NEWS
February 24, 2009
Computer accessory maker Atek recently introduced the Stagehand Wireless Presentation Controller. Features include range of more than 50 feet and an illumination light that lets you check notes or equipment problems when doing a presentation without having to turn on overhead room lights. On the Web: * Google Earth turned its high-resolution cameras to the renowned works of the Prado Museum in Madrid. The detail of Google Earth street views at which users have marveled is just as impressive while dissecting the intricacies of a Velasquez or a Rembrandt.
BUSINESS
By Craig Crossman and Craig Crossman,McClatchy-Tribune | July 26, 2007
Google never ceases to impress me. Its world-class search engine usually finds exactly what I'm looking for within the first results page and more typically falls within the first five choices. Then there was Google Maps, with the ability to locate almost any place on the planet. Google Earth appeared, and I still find myself spending hours just exploring the planet. I thought the latter was going to be hard to top, but Google may be on its way to doing just that. Recently during my radio show, my co-host told me to go to Google Maps and type in a location in Miami.
NEWS
By Troy McCullough and Troy McCullough,Sun Columnist | April 8, 2007
Bloggers weren't happy when they found out that Google had quietly swapped out its satellite images of hurricane-ravaged New Orleans with outdated pre-Katrina aerial views, but many took greater umbrage over a congressman's scolding of the search giant's practices. For its part, Google relented last week and put the post-Katrina images back online, but only after criticism had reached Capitol Hill. Rep. Brad Miller, a North Carolina Democrat who is chairman of a House science and technology subcommittee, wrote a letter to Google CEO Eric Schmidt asking him to explain himself and said the use of outdated images was akin to "airbrushing history."
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
When app developer Mindgrub Technologies outgrew its space for the umpteenth time, CEO Todd Marks did what any good tech entrepreneur would do - he turned to Google. An analysis of his employees' commutes using Google Maps and Google Earth led Marks to Locust Point, and the former Phillips Seafood headquarters. Mindgrub set up shop there three weeks ago and is set to get an official welcome from Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and a group of city small business leaders Wednesday. "We're really growing fast and we need to attract a lot of talent," Marks said, adding that many of the young professionals Mindgrub is seeking to recruit already live in the city and want to stay there.
NEWS
By Brad Schleicher and Brad Schleicher,Sun Staff | January 6, 2008
Nearly two hundred years ago President Thomas Jefferson sent explorers Lewis and Clark west, following the Mississippi and other rivers to the edge of the Rocky Mountains and then on to the Pacific Coast. The purpose was to map a path through the Louisiana Territory, the vast tract the United States had purchased from France. In that era and the years that followed, maps were powerful tools created to economically exploit the lands they described. Good maps produced significant wealth.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 9, 2012
Americans are a bit schizophrenic on the matter of immigration this election season. We can't seem to decide whether we want to send them all back where they came from or put the child of immigrants on the Republican ticket for president. (For the record, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio calls his Cuban parents "exiles," not "immigrants," although they left before Fidel Castro took over.) In the midst of this volatile conversation - are we going to build a wall along the Mexican border or simply ask everybody in the American Southwest to carry papers?
NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 9, 2012
Americans are a bit schizophrenic on the matter of immigration this election season. We can't seem to decide whether we want to send them all back where they came from or put the child of immigrants on the Republican ticket for president. (For the record, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio calls his Cuban parents "exiles," not "immigrants," although they left before Fidel Castro took over.) In the midst of this volatile conversation - are we going to build a wall along the Mexican border or simply ask everybody in the American Southwest to carry papers?
NEWS
February 24, 2009
Computer accessory maker Atek recently introduced the Stagehand Wireless Presentation Controller. Features include range of more than 50 feet and an illumination light that lets you check notes or equipment problems when doing a presentation without having to turn on overhead room lights. On the Web: * Google Earth turned its high-resolution cameras to the renowned works of the Prado Museum in Madrid. The detail of Google Earth street views at which users have marveled is just as impressive while dissecting the intricacies of a Velasquez or a Rembrandt.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | January 1, 2009
Minnesotans are a humorous people, and we are attempting to elect a comedian to the U.S. Senate, which is delicate work, as you might guess. You shouldn't sweep a comedian into office on a wave of public adulation any more than you should let him win the heroine in the first reel and fly off to Paris and suddenly start ordering meals in fluent French. You need him to move a piano up a long flight of stairs, and that's what Al Franken is doing now. He is leading the race by 50 votes or so out of 2.9 million cast.
NEWS
March 16, 2008
Baltimore City Public schools System pays two who alleged bias The Baltimore school system has paid $123,000 to two former employees who had alleged racial discrimination, according to the Baltimore Community Relations Commission. The former employees are James Kidd Jr. and Adrienne Brown, said Susan P. Randall, a spokeswoman for the commission. Kidd and Brown, who are African-American, alleged that the school system discriminated against them and then laid them off in retaliation after they complained internally about their treatment, according to a news release.
NEWS
By Brad Schleicher and Brad Schleicher,Sun Staff | January 6, 2008
Nearly two hundred years ago President Thomas Jefferson sent explorers Lewis and Clark west, following the Mississippi and other rivers to the edge of the Rocky Mountains and then on to the Pacific Coast. The purpose was to map a path through the Louisiana Territory, the vast tract the United States had purchased from France. In that era and the years that followed, maps were powerful tools created to economically exploit the lands they described. Good maps produced significant wealth.
BUSINESS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN REPORTER | August 23, 2007
Imagine having millions of stars and planets at your fingertips, without spending thousands on a telescope or shivering all night under a cold, dark sky. The universe is online, available from the comfort of your computer chair. It's a feature that Google developers, in collaboration with astronomers, have added to Google Earth, the Web site that provides millions of users with bird's-eye views of their home planet. Sky at Google Earth, which made its debut in cyberspace early yesterday, turns Googlers around and aims their eyes toward the heavens, with user-friendly tools for navigating and zooming deep into the skies of both the Northern and Southern hemispheres.
NEWS
March 16, 2008
Baltimore City Public schools System pays two who alleged bias The Baltimore school system has paid $123,000 to two former employees who had alleged racial discrimination, according to the Baltimore Community Relations Commission. The former employees are James Kidd Jr. and Adrienne Brown, said Susan P. Randall, a spokeswoman for the commission. Kidd and Brown, who are African-American, alleged that the school system discriminated against them and then laid them off in retaliation after they complained internally about their treatment, according to a news release.
TRAVEL
By KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | October 2, 2005
A new world of maps is unfolding online, giving travelers the power to scout their destination from as close as curbside to as far out as space. Take, for example, a trip to Manhattan. While a traveler planning such a trip might once have felt lost trying to pick a hotel or figuring out what landmarks were worth the walk, today's traveler could: l Choose a hotel from the virtual Big Apple in Google Earth (earth.google.com), then use the satellite feature of Google Maps and A9.com's Blockview to get a feel for the neighborhood.
BUSINESS
By Craig Crossman and Craig Crossman,McClatchy-Tribune | July 26, 2007
Google never ceases to impress me. Its world-class search engine usually finds exactly what I'm looking for within the first results page and more typically falls within the first five choices. Then there was Google Maps, with the ability to locate almost any place on the planet. Google Earth appeared, and I still find myself spending hours just exploring the planet. I thought the latter was going to be hard to top, but Google may be on its way to doing just that. Recently during my radio show, my co-host told me to go to Google Maps and type in a location in Miami.
NEWS
By Troy McCullough and Troy McCullough,Sun Columnist | April 8, 2007
Bloggers weren't happy when they found out that Google had quietly swapped out its satellite images of hurricane-ravaged New Orleans with outdated pre-Katrina aerial views, but many took greater umbrage over a congressman's scolding of the search giant's practices. For its part, Google relented last week and put the post-Katrina images back online, but only after criticism had reached Capitol Hill. Rep. Brad Miller, a North Carolina Democrat who is chairman of a House science and technology subcommittee, wrote a letter to Google CEO Eric Schmidt asking him to explain himself and said the use of outdated images was akin to "airbrushing history."
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