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By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2011
Travelers now have yet another option for finding the best flights and fares: Google Flight Search . I already think there are too many sites, including Fly.com, Kayak.com, CheapoAir.com, and of course the biggees, Orbitz and Expedia. Not to mention all of the airlines, including Southwest, which doesn't appear on any of those aggregate sites. (Google at least acknowledges Southwest and provides a link to the airline's site.) That hasn't stopped Google from entering the fray.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
A new eyeglass assembly lab in Halethorpe is poised to make prescription lenses for Google Glass after the wearable-computer product launches later this year. The VSPOne facility, which opened last month, expects substantial growth from more conventional sources - customers throughout the Northeast ordering regular eyeglasses. But the lab also has the technology needed to process orders for prescription Glass and expects to do so, said David Carr, a company spokesman. When, exactly, is up in the air. Glass - an Internet-connected display screen mounted on an eyeglass frame - is a prototype available only to beta testers for now. But Google expects to launch it sometime this year.
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NEWS
January 22, 2006
What do Janet Jackson, Hurricane Katrina and the Xbox 360 have in common? In 2005, they were among the top news searches on Google, says the company's year-end zeitgeist report. (Ms. Jackson, by the way, was No. 1, doubtless because of her "wardrobe malfunction.") If officers at the world's top search engine wanted to reveal more than that from the company's vast storehouse of retained data, they could go so far as to detail the content of almost half of all Internet searches - down to specific Web sites visited by particular computers.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
A while back I posted about some addlepated remarks about English usage being made in a conversation on Facebook by a friend of a friend, and was accused of violating her privacy. Yesterday, during the annual twitting of ill-informed people who refer to St. Patrick's Day as "St. Patty's Day," I was accused of stalking by one such person.  Neither party seems to have understood that posting on Facebook and Twitter is publication, and that any sense that such exchanges are private is an illusion.  Before the Internet, there were clearly understood conventions.
NEWS
November 23, 2010
I read Tuesday's rant from that un-American, left-wing socialist Marta Mossburg, criticizing the free market and capitalism, and I am outraged ( "Turns out Google's free e-mail is worth every penny," Nov. 23). How dare "comrade Mossburg" criticize Google for providing a free e-mail service! Doesn't she know Google is the biggest Internet company in the world? The free market has spoken, and Google is clearly divinely sent by Jesus and Ronald Reagan to deliver us from the evils of the socialist Democrats and their godless, secret Muslim leader Barack Hussein Obama.
NEWS
Gus G. Sentementes | May 2, 2012
People have wristbands to declare their affiliation and support of different groups or causes -- think "Livestrong", the yellow wristband campaign by cyclist Lance Armstrong that raises cancer awareness. But if you wear a new wristband designed by Baltimore's MissionTix, what affiliation are you declaring? I'll tell you: Your right to par-tay in da' club. The new wristband is a wearable and re-usable "ticket" for concerts that you want to attend. Users can just buy new tickets and their wristband gets "re-charged.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2010
Google postponed Tuesday the launch of its mobile phone in China, adding to the potential commercial fallout of its dispute with Beijing over Internet censorship and e-mail hacking. One person briefed on Google's decision said it was linked to the company's threat that it will shut its Chinese-based search engine if restrictions aren't eased.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2010
BEIJING - Google Inc.'s business ties in China unraveled a little more Wednesday amid a widening backlash to the U.S. Internet company's decision to move its Chinese search engine offshore in a challenge to the country's online censorship laws. While the stand is winning Google praise in the U.S. and other countries, it's threatening to turn the company into a pariah in China. A high-profile Communist Party newspaper skewered Google in a front-page article. And more of its partners and advertising customers in the country appeared to be distancing themselves from the company.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2010
TOPEKA, Kan. - Topeka's mayor says the city shall temporarily be referred to as "Google, Kansas - the capital city of fiber optics," in an effort to persuade the Internet giant to test an ultra-fast connection in the state capital. Mayor Bill Bunten issued the proclamation Monday after no city council members objected to the monthlong change. Bunten says the proclamation is mainly for fun, but that he hopes it will set Topeka apart from other cities vying for Google's fiber-optics experiment, including Baltimore, Grand Rapids, Mich.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2010
B altimore might not be willing to follow the lead of Topeka, Kan., and rename itself Google for a month to catch the attention of the search engine giant, but there are plenty of reasons why Charm City would be the ideal place for the company's ultra-high-speed Internet pilot project. Baltimore has an active, engaged tech community pushing hard for the project, but it is at a stage in its development that the attraction of super-speed Internet access could really make a difference.
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Johns Hopkins researchers are well on their way to building a digital library of children's brain images, which they say eventually will give doctors around the world access to a free Google-like search engine that could help diagnose and treat pediatric neurological disorders. The goal is for any doctor to be able to upload a patient's MRI scan, then wait for the computer to spit out results as it searches for images in the databank with similar patterns and known diagnoses. The databank, which has 7,000 brain images of Hopkins patients and counting, should be publicly available in three years, said Dr. Thierry Huisman, a professor of radiology, neurology and pediatrics and the director of pediatric radiology and neuroradiology at the Hopkins Children's Center.
FEATURES
February 3, 2014
A new app from the publishers of "The Handy Answer Book for Kids" is a great resource for curious kids (and their parents, who - gasp - actually don't know everything). Why do dogs bark? Why is the sky blue? Why do people have to grow old? Answers to these and about 800 other questions are now at your fingertips. And it's also kid-friendly, so you can feel good about letting children explore instead of just turning them loose on Google. There's also a “surprise me” button to find answers to questions that hadn't even been asked yet. $1.99 on iTunes, available for iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2014
Harriet Tubman, the Marylander credited with leading hundreds of slaves to freedom through the Underground Railroad, was honored with a Google Doodle today. The Google search engine periodically uses an artistic interpretation of its logo, known as the Doodle, to honor famous people or commemorate holidays and events. The Tubman-inspired logo that appeared Saturday features a drawing of Tubman holding a lantern against a night sky, with the letters made to look like tree branches.
BUSINESS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
Not long ago state officials in Maryland faced a technology roadblock that anyone who works at a private company would find quaint: There was no easy way to blast an email to the entire workforce. For an administration led by an early BlackBerry addict, the inability to quickly send government-wide emails in an emergency - or even to invite state employees to the executive mansion for the annual open house - was an odd holdover from an era before camera phones and touch screens. Now, roughly 54,000 state employees are switching to a cloud-based email and scheduling system provided by tech giant Google - making Maryland the largest state in the nation to rely on the ubiquitous search engine firm for email, calendars and document sharing.
NEWS
By Sean Welsh and The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2013
Ever wonder how, exactly, Santa traverses the globe?  Certainly he works by time zone, but does he work his way up the Atlantic coast, or is he coming into Maryland by crossing the Mason-Dixon Line? Ponder no longer. This Christmas Eve, share in the Santa experience with your kids by checking out the NORAD Santa Tracker . The site gives eager little elves a chance to follow Jolly Old St. Nick as he and his reindeer-powered sleigh traverse the globe. NORAD , the U.S. North American Aerospace Defense Command, tracks Kris Kringle from its headquarters in Colorado.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2013
The igloo-like snow globe in the middle of the Annapolis mall caught the eye of James Soni. The three-year-old darted inside, pulling his mother and father along. The family, told they could dress up and appear in a short, slow-motion video, was filmed in two takes tossing snowballs in the air, to the delight of their son. The gigantic globe, which doubles as a mini production studio, is clearly the centerpiece of Google's new retail venture: Temporary shops set up in six locations nationwide, including Westfield Annapolis mall.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gerald P. Merrell and Gerald P. Merrell,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2004
Clarification In an article in Sunday's Arts & Society section, the great-niece of Edward Kasner, the mathematician who popularized the term "googol," misspoke when she said she first heard of Google, the Internet search engine, in 1988. The company was formed in 1998. In the late 1930s, noted mathematician and Columbia University professor Edward Kasner was asked to come up with a name for an extraordinarily large number. While on a walk one day, he asked his 9-year-old nephew, Milton Sirotta, if he had any ideas.
NEWS
December 12, 2013
Is it me, or does anyone else see the irony of mega web companies like Apple, Google and Facebook calling for tighter controls on how the government collects personal data? In this scenario, are those companies the pot or the kettle? The pot, I think. Jonathan S. Rosenthal, Pasadena - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
December 12, 2013
Is it me, or does anyone else see the irony of mega web companies like Apple, Google and Facebook calling for tighter controls on how the government collects personal data? In this scenario, are those companies the pot or the kettle? The pot, I think. Jonathan S. Rosenthal, Pasadena - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
Anne Arundel County government officials say the days of delays are gone for employees opening and responding to email messages. More than 6,000 county government email addresses were switched this month from an old system called GroupWise to a Google-based system. The old system was slow and problematic, county officials say. It was shut down for a weekend in June so information technology workers could fix problems after employees endured a week of receiving delayed messages - or no messages at all. "It was definitely on its last legs," said Rick Durkee, the county's chief information officer.
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