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August 11, 2006
The QUESTION Miami Vice was all the rage in the '80s. How does Michael Mann's movie version stack up against the hit TV show? you're such a critic WHAT YOU SAY Quite honestly, I did not feel the buddy connection between Colin Farrell and Jamie Foxx's characters, nor between Colin Farrell and his love interest Gong Li. In fact, I thought that Gong Li's character was flat in most scenes. The scenery and some of the cinematography was awesome. I did see the film at The Senator, which even in the case of a "B" film, it's one of the best places in Baltimore, along with The Charles to experience a film.
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August 11, 2006
The QUESTION Miami Vice was all the rage in the '80s. How does Michael Mann's movie version stack up against the hit TV show? you're such a critic WHAT YOU SAY Quite honestly, I did not feel the buddy connection between Colin Farrell and Jamie Foxx's characters, nor between Colin Farrell and his love interest Gong Li. In fact, I thought that Gong Li's character was flat in most scenes. The scenery and some of the cinematography was awesome. I did see the film at The Senator, which even in the case of a "B" film, it's one of the best places in Baltimore, along with The Charles to experience a film.
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FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 22, 1998
Hong Kong on the eve of the Chinese takeover serves as the kinetic, subtly explosive backdrop for "Chinese Box." Starring Jeremy Irons, Gong Li and Maggie Cheung, this part-romantic, part-political drama evokes with eloquent imagery and exquisite detail the heightened emotions that come into play at a time of societal transition.For his eighth film, director Wayne Wang uses edgy, immediate camera work and the bold palette of neon signs and city markets to draw the audience into a world that seems to be disappearing just as it is being created.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 28, 2006
Miami Vice, the new-millennium movie version of the seminal '80s TV hit, packs hard-grained texture and tingling moods into a bullet-riddled scenario. It sheds the series' famous and influential pastel look and plunges its cast of villains and warriors into the 21st century. Colin Farrell, a brooder with a glint in his eye, doesn't mimic either Don Johnson's heat or his cool as Sonny Crockett: He makes the role his own with an enigmatic volatility that fills the screen. And Jamie Foxx as Crockett's partner, Ricardo Tubbs, gives the franchise a huge upgrade from Philip Michael Thomas.
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By Dave Kehr and Dave Kehr,New York Daily News | May 25, 1994
"I've never seen 23 films in one week before," said Cannes jury president Clint Eastwood. "It makes me want to go home and cut at least 20 minutes out of every movie I ever made."Nevertheless, Mr. Eastwood and his nine colleagues, including jury vice president Catherine Deneuve, survived such endurance contests as a 2-hour, 33-minute Indian film about a roadside coffee shop (highlight: rat drowning in a jar of yogurt) to arrive at a verdict Monday night, bringing to an end the 47th annual Cannes Film Festival in France.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 3, 2000
"The Emperor and the Assassin," a sprawling history of China during the third century B.C., is a stunning motion picture, but of interest only to those who are familiar with the events it depicts, or have a burning desire to learn about them. The story of King Ying Zheng, the emperor who dreamt of unifying China's seven provinces, doesn't lack in sweep or visual beauty, but it's not as compellingly watchable as director Chen Kaige's earlier films ("Yellow Earth," "Farewell My Concubine")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 18, 1993
"The Story of Qiu Ju"Starring Gong LiDirected by Zhang YimouReleased by Sony PicturesUnrated***DTC When the village chief kicked Qiu Ju's husband in the testicles after the impudent man had made light of his inability to make male heirs, he probably didn't give it a second thought. He was the chief. Who was this worm but a chili farmer on some patch of scabby land outside the village, to be sent scuffling home?Talk about your classic Bad Career Move.For in his unrepentant way, the chief had engaged the ire of Qiu Ju, a kind of mini-Terminator from rural China, who . . . just . . . keeps . . . coming.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | July 11, 1991
If I didn't know any better I'd think that old Jim Thompson, the nihilist sage of Anadarko, Okla., had wandered into rural China and had a hand in the making of "Ju Dou," which opens today at the Charles.The materials feel like a steaming platter of Moo Goo Gai Thompson, complete to vicious deceit, small-beer betrayal, bizarre psychological permutations, extreme cruelty and the intercession of fate heavier than the arrival of Halley's comet.It features: a greedy mill owner in a country town who beats his new young wife while abusing her sexually; the wife's bonding, first sexually, then emotionally, with her husband's innocuous nephew; their flirtation with the idea of murder until fate takes an ironic hand by paralyzing the old tyrant from the waist down; their decision to lock him in a wheelbarrow and torture him with their happiness; and finally, the arrival of an avenging angel -- a solemn psychopathic child -- to destroy all. It should have had a roughly lyrical Thompsonian title: "The Big Red Kill."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1997
Like the opium haze in which it shrouds itself, "Temptress Moon" presents a beautiful picture that takes its time getting nowhere.The latest unseen-in-China film from Chinese director Chen Kaige ("Farewell, My Concubine"), "Moon" is set primarily in the 1920s and tells the story of a wealthy family unable and unwilling to come to grips with modern society. Writ larger, it's the story of an ancient, closed culture unable and unwilling to establish much of a foothold in the modern world.Sent as a child to live with the opulent, but morally empty, Pang family (who use him mostly to prepare their opium pipes)
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 28, 2006
Miami Vice, the new-millennium movie version of the seminal '80s TV hit, packs hard-grained texture and tingling moods into a bullet-riddled scenario. It sheds the series' famous and influential pastel look and plunges its cast of villains and warriors into the 21st century. Colin Farrell, a brooder with a glint in his eye, doesn't mimic either Don Johnson's heat or his cool as Sonny Crockett: He makes the role his own with an enigmatic volatility that fills the screen. And Jamie Foxx as Crockett's partner, Ricardo Tubbs, gives the franchise a huge upgrade from Philip Michael Thomas.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN REPORTER | December 25, 2005
Some movies seem destined to inspire fashion. Memoirs of a Geisha, which opened in Baltimore Friday, is one of them. Critics have given the lush romantic epic mixed reviews, but they have nothing but praise for the sumptuous costumes by Colleen Atwood, who won an Oscar for her work on Chicago. The movie version of Arthur Golden's best-selling novel is filled with brightly colored, beautifully embroidered kimonos, some of which were rented, others which took months to create. They are more than just costumes; at least two important plot twists revolve around them.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 3, 2000
"The Emperor and the Assassin," a sprawling history of China during the third century B.C., is a stunning motion picture, but of interest only to those who are familiar with the events it depicts, or have a burning desire to learn about them. The story of King Ying Zheng, the emperor who dreamt of unifying China's seven provinces, doesn't lack in sweep or visual beauty, but it's not as compellingly watchable as director Chen Kaige's earlier films ("Yellow Earth," "Farewell My Concubine")
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 22, 1998
Hong Kong on the eve of the Chinese takeover serves as the kinetic, subtly explosive backdrop for "Chinese Box." Starring Jeremy Irons, Gong Li and Maggie Cheung, this part-romantic, part-political drama evokes with eloquent imagery and exquisite detail the heightened emotions that come into play at a time of societal transition.For his eighth film, director Wayne Wang uses edgy, immediate camera work and the bold palette of neon signs and city markets to draw the audience into a world that seems to be disappearing just as it is being created.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1997
Like the opium haze in which it shrouds itself, "Temptress Moon" presents a beautiful picture that takes its time getting nowhere.The latest unseen-in-China film from Chinese director Chen Kaige ("Farewell, My Concubine"), "Moon" is set primarily in the 1920s and tells the story of a wealthy family unable and unwilling to come to grips with modern society. Writ larger, it's the story of an ancient, closed culture unable and unwilling to establish much of a foothold in the modern world.Sent as a child to live with the opulent, but morally empty, Pang family (who use him mostly to prepare their opium pipes)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 16, 1996
Despite the gaudy title, Zhang Yimou's "Shanghai Triad," which opens today at the Charles, is a muted, even contemplative movie that is less about the gangster trade in the most dangerous city of the '30s than it is about the small epiphanies of humanity that occasionally come in the most unlikely of circumstances to the most unlikely of people.Imagine "The Godfather" through the eyes of a 13-year-old boy just in from the hinterlands of rural Jersey and his dad's pepper farm, and you have an idea of the originality, and the oddity, of the film.
FEATURES
By Dave Kehr and Dave Kehr,New York Daily News | May 25, 1994
"I've never seen 23 films in one week before," said Cannes jury president Clint Eastwood. "It makes me want to go home and cut at least 20 minutes out of every movie I ever made."Nevertheless, Mr. Eastwood and his nine colleagues, including jury vice president Catherine Deneuve, survived such endurance contests as a 2-hour, 33-minute Indian film about a roadside coffee shop (highlight: rat drowning in a jar of yogurt) to arrive at a verdict Monday night, bringing to an end the 47th annual Cannes Film Festival in France.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 16, 1996
Despite the gaudy title, Zhang Yimou's "Shanghai Triad," which opens today at the Charles, is a muted, even contemplative movie that is less about the gangster trade in the most dangerous city of the '30s than it is about the small epiphanies of humanity that occasionally come in the most unlikely of circumstances to the most unlikely of people.Imagine "The Godfather" through the eyes of a 13-year-old boy just in from the hinterlands of rural Jersey and his dad's pepper farm, and you have an idea of the originality, and the oddity, of the film.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN REPORTER | December 25, 2005
Some movies seem destined to inspire fashion. Memoirs of a Geisha, which opened in Baltimore Friday, is one of them. Critics have given the lush romantic epic mixed reviews, but they have nothing but praise for the sumptuous costumes by Colleen Atwood, who won an Oscar for her work on Chicago. The movie version of Arthur Golden's best-selling novel is filled with brightly colored, beautifully embroidered kimonos, some of which were rented, others which took months to create. They are more than just costumes; at least two important plot twists revolve around them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 18, 1993
"The Story of Qiu Ju"Starring Gong LiDirected by Zhang YimouReleased by Sony PicturesUnrated***DTC When the village chief kicked Qiu Ju's husband in the testicles after the impudent man had made light of his inability to make male heirs, he probably didn't give it a second thought. He was the chief. Who was this worm but a chili farmer on some patch of scabby land outside the village, to be sent scuffling home?Talk about your classic Bad Career Move.For in his unrepentant way, the chief had engaged the ire of Qiu Ju, a kind of mini-Terminator from rural China, who . . . just . . . keeps . . . coming.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | July 11, 1991
If I didn't know any better I'd think that old Jim Thompson, the nihilist sage of Anadarko, Okla., had wandered into rural China and had a hand in the making of "Ju Dou," which opens today at the Charles.The materials feel like a steaming platter of Moo Goo Gai Thompson, complete to vicious deceit, small-beer betrayal, bizarre psychological permutations, extreme cruelty and the intercession of fate heavier than the arrival of Halley's comet.It features: a greedy mill owner in a country town who beats his new young wife while abusing her sexually; the wife's bonding, first sexually, then emotionally, with her husband's innocuous nephew; their flirtation with the idea of murder until fate takes an ironic hand by paralyzing the old tyrant from the waist down; their decision to lock him in a wheelbarrow and torture him with their happiness; and finally, the arrival of an avenging angel -- a solemn psychopathic child -- to destroy all. It should have had a roughly lyrical Thompsonian title: "The Big Red Kill."
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