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Gomez Addams

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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2012
Benjamin Wade spent his dinner hour Tuesday lying on a bed of nails, smiling as a stream of people, including Baltimore's mayor and TV's Gomez Addams, stood on his stomach and posed for pictures. Better known by his stage name, SideShow Bennie, Wade was one of a quartet of performers at Harborplace Tuesday for the official opening of the 32nd Ripley's Believe It or Not Odditorium. Along with his colleagues, Bennie was there to personify the oddities Ripley's has been known for since founder Robert Ripley drew his first Believe It or Not comic panel 94 years ago. Promising an assortment of "the strange, the extraordinary, the bizarre and the unconventionally beautiful," barker and performer Todd Robbins stood outside the Light Street Pavilion, where the Odditorium occupies much of the second floor, and worked the crowd.
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
Fifty years after "The Addams Family" debuted on TV in black and white, John Astin still has that wild gleam in his eye and the same mischievous grin. With his thick mustache, albeit a white one, he could easily be Gomez Addams in his debonair golden years - minus the eyeliner, pinstriped suit and cigar. Now 84, the veteran actor recently told a rapt audience of student thespians at Glenelg High School what most people familiar with the popular show already suspected - a lot of his personality went into creating the patriarch of one of the oddest families ever on TV. Finding a part of yourself that you can meld into an authentic portrayal of a character is something all actors should pursue, he told the cast of the Columbia Center for Theatrical Arts' summer production of the Broadway musical based on the 1964-1966 series.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
It's official: Gomez has own theater. A newly renovated theater in the Johns Hopkins University's Merrick Barn was renamed Saturday in honor of the actor who originated the role on television of Gomez Addams, husband to Morticia and patriarch of one of America's weirdest clans on "The Addams Family. " On hand Saturday night to rename the 104-seat performing space "The John Astin Theatre" after its $210,000 make-over was Astin's close friend, the actor Ed Asner. Astin, a member of the class of 1952, starred in "The Addams Family" from 1964 to 1966, and returned to his alma mater in 2001 to teach acting and directing.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
Johns Hopkins University students scramble to sign up for a coveted spot in the acting and directing classes taught by John Astin. After all, who wouldn't want to study theatrical techniques with a famous actor? Internationally known for his role as Gomez Addams in the 1960s television show "The Addams Family," the Baltimore-born Astin has received Academy Award and Emmy nominations for his work in front of the camera, and also for writing and directing. Perhaps the most meaningful recognition came last December, when it was announced that the university's renovated Merrick Barn theater would now bear his name: The John Astin Theatre.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1999
"Cara mia!" Gomez Addams as Edgar Allan Poe?Yes, John Astin, whose most familiar role was as the patriarch of the Addams family, comes to Baltimore this weekend to portray Edgar Allan Poe.Picturing Astin in the role as Poe somehow works. Perhaps it's because Gomez was certainly a weird and wacky character. And Poe? What can you say about a man who gave the world "The Pit and the Pendulum" and "The Telltale Heart"? Weird? Yes. Wacky? Some would say, even allowing for his immense talent.So Astin, with his kindly yet slightly crazed eyes, easily makes the jump from Gomez to Poe. Crowds of people have already enjoyed watching him portray the writer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2012
It has all the weight and nutritional value of cotton candy. But "The Addams Family," the Broadway musical that has taken up temporary residence at the Hippodrome Theatre, adds up to a mildly entertaining package of song and shtick. Revised since its New York premiere, which received a drubbing from the press, the show provides a workable vehicle for the characters first immortalized by the Charles Addams cartoons and memorably brought to life by the 1960s TV series. Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice, who wrote the book, borrowed a well-used device to frame the musical — the comic collision of opposites.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
Fifty years after "The Addams Family" debuted on TV in black and white, John Astin still has that wild gleam in his eye and the same mischievous grin. With his thick mustache, albeit a white one, he could easily be Gomez Addams in his debonair golden years - minus the eyeliner, pinstriped suit and cigar. Now 84, the veteran actor recently told a rapt audience of student thespians at Glenelg High School what most people familiar with the popular show already suspected - a lot of his personality went into creating the patriarch of one of the oddest families ever on TV. Finding a part of yourself that you can meld into an authentic portrayal of a character is something all actors should pursue, he told the cast of the Columbia Center for Theatrical Arts' summer production of the Broadway musical based on the 1964-1966 series.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
Johns Hopkins University students scramble to sign up for a coveted spot in the acting and directing classes taught by John Astin. After all, who wouldn't want to study theatrical techniques with a famous actor? Internationally known for his role as Gomez Addams in the 1960s television show "The Addams Family," the Baltimore-born Astin has received Academy Award and Emmy nominations for his work in front of the camera, and also for writing and directing. Perhaps the most meaningful recognition came last December, when it was announced that the university's renovated Merrick Barn theater would now bear his name: The John Astin Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2012
After a performance of "The Addams Family," the Broadway musical now playing at the Hippodrome Theatre, a tall, bald, mustachioed man went backstage to greet the cast - the original, the ultimate Gomez Addams, John Astin. Douglas Sills, who portrays the head of the spooky household in the musical, dropped to the floor and did an elaborate kowtow. "You're a hero," Sills said. "Thank you for passing the torch to us. " That torch was lit 48 years ago, when the "The Addams Family" series debuted, fleshing out the slightly spooky, thoroughly contented characters created by New Yorker cartoonist Charles Addams.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1995
This Baltimore native's first movie was "West Side Story." He co-starred in an episode of "The Twilight Zone" with Cliff Robertson. A short film he wrote and directed was nominated for an Oscar. He played a theater critic in a TV series starring Mary Tyler Moore. He's had guest shots on "Night Court" and "Mad About You." And, beginning tomorrow evening, he'll be playing Scrooge at the Morris Mechanic Theater through Sunday.Give up? How about one more clue?He was the original Gomez Addams.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2012
Benjamin Wade spent his dinner hour Tuesday lying on a bed of nails, smiling as a stream of people, including Baltimore's mayor and TV's Gomez Addams, stood on his stomach and posed for pictures. Better known by his stage name, SideShow Bennie, Wade was one of a quartet of performers at Harborplace Tuesday for the official opening of the 32nd Ripley's Believe It or Not Odditorium. Along with his colleagues, Bennie was there to personify the oddities Ripley's has been known for since founder Robert Ripley drew his first Believe It or Not comic panel 94 years ago. Promising an assortment of "the strange, the extraordinary, the bizarre and the unconventionally beautiful," barker and performer Todd Robbins stood outside the Light Street Pavilion, where the Odditorium occupies much of the second floor, and worked the crowd.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2012
It has all the weight and nutritional value of cotton candy. But "The Addams Family," the Broadway musical that has taken up temporary residence at the Hippodrome Theatre, adds up to a mildly entertaining package of song and shtick. Revised since its New York premiere, which received a drubbing from the press, the show provides a workable vehicle for the characters first immortalized by the Charles Addams cartoons and memorably brought to life by the 1960s TV series. Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice, who wrote the book, borrowed a well-used device to frame the musical — the comic collision of opposites.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2012
After a performance of "The Addams Family," the Broadway musical now playing at the Hippodrome Theatre, a tall, bald, mustachioed man went backstage to greet the cast - the original, the ultimate Gomez Addams, John Astin. Douglas Sills, who portrays the head of the spooky household in the musical, dropped to the floor and did an elaborate kowtow. "You're a hero," Sills said. "Thank you for passing the torch to us. " That torch was lit 48 years ago, when the "The Addams Family" series debuted, fleshing out the slightly spooky, thoroughly contented characters created by New Yorker cartoonist Charles Addams.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
It's official: Gomez has own theater. A newly renovated theater in the Johns Hopkins University's Merrick Barn was renamed Saturday in honor of the actor who originated the role on television of Gomez Addams, husband to Morticia and patriarch of one of America's weirdest clans on "The Addams Family. " On hand Saturday night to rename the 104-seat performing space "The John Astin Theatre" after its $210,000 make-over was Astin's close friend, the actor Ed Asner. Astin, a member of the class of 1952, starred in "The Addams Family" from 1964 to 1966, and returned to his alma mater in 2001 to teach acting and directing.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1999
"Cara mia!" Gomez Addams as Edgar Allan Poe?Yes, John Astin, whose most familiar role was as the patriarch of the Addams family, comes to Baltimore this weekend to portray Edgar Allan Poe.Picturing Astin in the role as Poe somehow works. Perhaps it's because Gomez was certainly a weird and wacky character. And Poe? What can you say about a man who gave the world "The Pit and the Pendulum" and "The Telltale Heart"? Weird? Yes. Wacky? Some would say, even allowing for his immense talent.So Astin, with his kindly yet slightly crazed eyes, easily makes the jump from Gomez to Poe. Crowds of people have already enjoyed watching him portray the writer.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1995
This Baltimore native's first movie was "West Side Story." He co-starred in an episode of "The Twilight Zone" with Cliff Robertson. A short film he wrote and directed was nominated for an Oscar. He played a theater critic in a TV series starring Mary Tyler Moore. He's had guest shots on "Night Court" and "Mad About You." And, beginning tomorrow evening, he'll be playing Scrooge at the Morris Mechanic Theater through Sunday.Give up? How about one more clue?He was the original Gomez Addams.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | March 12, 2001
IT'S A weekday morning, and I'm sitting in a dimly lighted theater at Johns Hopkins University, trying very hard not to freak out as one of my childhood heroes, Gomez Addams, leans against the stage. If Lurch the butler comes shuffling out and intones: "You rang?" or Morticia Addams suddenly appears and plants a kiss on Gomez's forehead, we will have officially entered a time warp. At which point, I plan to calmly stand up, walk out to my car and check into a psych unit. Oh, somewhere in my fevered brain, I know this man near the stage is really the wonderful actor John Astin.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2001
The attire is anything from "T-shirts to tiaras." The guest host is Gomez Addams of the Addams Family television show. And the theme of the night is disproving urban myths. No, it's not a Halloween party. It's the Greater Baltimore Technology Council's 12th annual TechNite. The event, expected to attract more than 1,000 guests from local businesses, seeks to intensify the energy in the technology community. Tickets went for $100 or $130 apiece. After the cost of the event is paid for, proceeds are to go into the tech council's operating budget.
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