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By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 19, 1997
At the close of the "Cosby" television show on Jan. 20, there appeared a still photograph of a man who was familiar onlyvaguely -- if familiar at all -- to most viewers. These words accompanied the picture: "In memory of Sheldon Leonard. My last father."Sheldon Leonard died Jan. 10 at age 89. He was a major player in producing entertainment programs for television in the early years of the medium. His career is a reminder that when great social forces are clashing in the United States, heroes can come from anywhere and epic victories can be won in unexpected places.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | January 4, 2008
In the year-end issue of Entertainment Weekly, critic Ken Tucker griped about DVD collections of sitcoms well past their prime - or, as he put it, "Surely there weren't that many completists clamoring for" the fifth season of Wings on DVD. Granted, the man has a point; here's betting my 10th season of even Frasier, as great a show as that was, will never get opened. But what about classic sitcoms not yet available in all their glory? I, for one (and I can't believe I'm the only one), have been waiting for the fifth season of The Mary Tyler Moore Show ever since Season 4 was released in June 2006.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | January 4, 2008
In the year-end issue of Entertainment Weekly, critic Ken Tucker griped about DVD collections of sitcoms well past their prime - or, as he put it, "Surely there weren't that many completists clamoring for" the fifth season of Wings on DVD. Granted, the man has a point; here's betting my 10th season of even Frasier, as great a show as that was, will never get opened. But what about classic sitcoms not yet available in all their glory? I, for one (and I can't believe I'm the only one), have been waiting for the fifth season of The Mary Tyler Moore Show ever since Season 4 was released in June 2006.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 19, 1997
At the close of the "Cosby" television show on Jan. 20, there appeared a still photograph of a man who was familiar onlyvaguely -- if familiar at all -- to most viewers. These words accompanied the picture: "In memory of Sheldon Leonard. My last father."Sheldon Leonard died Jan. 10 at age 89. He was a major player in producing entertainment programs for television in the early years of the medium. His career is a reminder that when great social forces are clashing in the United States, heroes can come from anywhere and epic victories can be won in unexpected places.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | October 8, 1991
Two quotes ring with particular resonance in a new biography of former heavyweight boxing champ Muhammad Ali premiering on cable tonight."I'm actually too good for my time," we hear him saying at a 1967 press conference regarding his banishment from boxing, for refusing on religious grounds to be drafted into the Army.And near the end of this edition of the Arts & Entertainment network's "Biography" (at 8 p.m. and again at midnight), in a clip of fairly recent vintage, he says in sadly halting fashion, "I'm happy to be getting out [of boxing]
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 16, 1996
LOS ANGELES -- There's nothing new about the television programming strategy of having stars from one series appear in another. As far back as the 1960s, for instance, Sheriff Andy Taylor and other Mayberry residents from "The Andy Griffith Show" were regularly visiting Pvt. Gomer Pyle on "Gomer Pyle, USMC."But there's never been a crossover quite like the one NBC has planned for Feb. 7 and Feb. 9 on episodes of "Law & Order" and "Homicide: Life on the Street," when two of television's smartest adult dramas combine characters in a story line.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | March 4, 1991
OK, everybody probably remembers the phrase "nanu, nanu," and maybe even the Vulcan-like hand gesture that went with it. It means "goodbye" in the language of the planet Ork. But who remembers the other word which every kid in school seemed to be saying following the 1978 splashdown of "Mork & Mindy" on ABC?We'll tell you in a minute, after noting reruns of the four-season Robin Williams sitcom join the Nick at Nite nightly cable lineup tonight with two episodes at 8 and 8:30.The series, of course, told the story of space alien Mork (Williams)
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 17, 2006
To attend She's the Man is to land on Planet Tweener, eerily similar yet distant from Planet Earth. On this simultaneously coarse and wholesome orb, a boy can drop trou and a girl can lift her blouse without posing for a Boys or Girls Gone Wild video. Forget the thrills and dangers of precocious sexuality. The one goal here is turning your steady into a good kisser. The most amazing thing about Planet Tweener is the way spunky, soccer-loving Viola (Amanda Bynes) successfully impersonates a frisky teenage male.
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By Rob Hiaasen | December 17, 1996
Hey, if you wish big, mean Baltimore could be just a little like small, friendly Mayberry, N.C., this gift's for you. "Say 'Hey' to these Happy Mayberry Accessories!," offered this holiday season Hawthorne Village sculptures, maker of those ubiquitous Christmas villages. "Bring your Mayberry town to life!" Hark, do tell us more! The $21.90 "Have a Great Day" set, for example, features Opie dashing to school and Aunt Bee in her Sunday best, headin' for church -- a sweet, timeless TV image captured in handcrafted pewter figurines.
ENTERTAINMENT
By FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | February 18, 2001
Andy Griffith is everywhere. On "Matlock" reruns, solving crimes and eating chili dogs. On reruns of "The Andy Griffith Show" as a single parent counseling his son, Opie, played by a young Ron Howard. He even made an appearance on a recent episode of "Dawson's Creek." Now Andy is in Sunday school. Joey Fann, a 35-year-old computer engineer, has developed a series of Sunday school lessons based on the moral and ethical lessons illustrated by the TV adventures of Andy, Opie, Barney Fife, Gomer Pyle and others.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 16, 1996
LOS ANGELES -- There's nothing new about the television programming strategy of having stars from one series appear in another. As far back as the 1960s, for instance, Sheriff Andy Taylor and other Mayberry residents from "The Andy Griffith Show" were regularly visiting Pvt. Gomer Pyle on "Gomer Pyle, USMC."But there's never been a crossover quite like the one NBC has planned for Feb. 7 and Feb. 9 on episodes of "Law & Order" and "Homicide: Life on the Street," when two of television's smartest adult dramas combine characters in a story line.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | October 8, 1991
Two quotes ring with particular resonance in a new biography of former heavyweight boxing champ Muhammad Ali premiering on cable tonight."I'm actually too good for my time," we hear him saying at a 1967 press conference regarding his banishment from boxing, for refusing on religious grounds to be drafted into the Army.And near the end of this edition of the Arts & Entertainment network's "Biography" (at 8 p.m. and again at midnight), in a clip of fairly recent vintage, he says in sadly halting fashion, "I'm happy to be getting out [of boxing]
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | March 4, 1991
OK, everybody probably remembers the phrase "nanu, nanu," and maybe even the Vulcan-like hand gesture that went with it. It means "goodbye" in the language of the planet Ork. But who remembers the other word which every kid in school seemed to be saying following the 1978 splashdown of "Mork & Mindy" on ABC?We'll tell you in a minute, after noting reruns of the four-season Robin Williams sitcom join the Nick at Nite nightly cable lineup tonight with two episodes at 8 and 8:30.The series, of course, told the story of space alien Mork (Williams)
NEWS
January 12, 1997
Sheldon Leonard, 89, who went from playing Hollywood tough guys to producing such television hits as "The Andy Griffith Show," "The Dick Van Dyke Show" and "I Spy," died Friday at his home in Beverly Hills.Leonard played underworld figures in the 1940s and 1950s, speaking out of the side of his mouth in such films as "Guys and Dolls" and "Pocketful of Miracles." One of his best-remembered roles was in 1946 when he played the bartender who threw Jimmy Stewart out on his ear in the classic "It's a Wonderful Life."
NEWS
October 14, 2006
Jerry Belson, an Emmy-winning comedy writer for The Tracey Ullman Show and other TV shows, died of cancer Tuesday at his Los Angeles home. He was 68. Mr. Belson worked on some of the most celebrated sitcoms of the 1960s and 1970s, including Gomer Pyle, USMC, The Dick Van Dyke Show and The Odd Couple. A scene that Mr. Belson wrote into The Odd Couple involved the character Felix Unger describing the funeral of a dog named "Spot Moskowitz," attended by dogs wearing yarmulkes. After teaming with comedic actress Tracey Ullman, Mr. Belson won three Emmy awards - in 1989 and 1990, for his work on her Fox comedy, and in 1997, for writing on Tracey Takes On...
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