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NEWS
January 24, 2002
THIS IS A DISASTER of Old Testament proportions: A lakeside resort city is overrun by Tutsi and Hutu refugees from genocide in a neighboring country; a rebellion ensues; rebels seize control; and a fiery river of lava cleaves the land in two. Food supplies from the United Nations arrived in Goma this week; the international community is helping, as it should. But President Joseph Kabila of the Democratic Republic of the Congo has said he wants aid to bypass the city's rebel commanders.
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NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,Los Angeles Times | October 31, 2008
GOMA, Congo - An uneasy calm returned to this battered Congolese city yesterday as a tenuous cease-fire halted clashes and residents struggled to resume their regular lives. Many of the thousands of panicked people who fled regional displacement camps a day earlier and stormed into Goma, a city in northeastern Democratic Republic of Congo, began traveling back to nearby camps. In contrast to Wednesday's stampede, when people feared rebels were in hot pursuit, the return trip was a somber procession, with weary people of all ages carrying mattresses, blankets and wood kindling toward an uncertain future.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 3, 1996
GOMA, Zaire -- The town of Goma fell to Zairian rebels and Rwandan troops yesterday, leading the United Nations to evacuate its foreign staff and thus leaving hundreds of thousands of refugees in nearby camps with only a few days' supply of food and warfare raging all around them.The evacuation of relief workers and the severing of food supply lines by the fighting is a disaster for the refugees of the Hutu ethnic group who have been living in camps around Goma for two years. The rebels are members of the Tutsi group, which controls the Rwandan army that the refugees fled into Zaire to escape.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 26, 2005
GOMA, Congo - Unidentified militia fighters ambushed and killed nine U.N. peacekeepers yesterday in the volatile Ituri region of eastern Congo. It was the worst attack in the six years of the mission and a sign of continued instability ahead of planned nationwide elections. The nine soldiers were Bangladeshis on a foot patrol near the town of Kafe, about 20 miles northwest of Bunia, the capital of Ituri province. They were protecting a nearby camp housing thousands of people who fled their villages in recent weeks because of attacks by militias.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2002
In the black lava that has formed a wall of rock through the port city of Goma, relief workers and experts hope to find a silver lining - the beginning of an end to the long and bloody civil war that has ravaged the Democratic Republic of Congo far longer than the volcanic eruption. Some who have watched and worked in Africa's third-largest country for years say the eruption of Mount Nyiragongo Jan. 17 might prompt new cooperation in what has seemed an irreconcilable dispute among rebels, government forces and ethnic factions.
TOPIC
By Carter Dougherty and Carter Dougherty,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 10, 2003
GOMA, Congo -- For Didier Abonge, a telephone link between this city on the border with Rwanda and the capital, Kinshasa, means that the Democratic Republic of Congo's civil war is over. A marketing manager for a mobile telephone company, Abonge has arrived in Goma with blue-and-orange billboards, T-shirts and leaflets to sell service in the town where rebels began a war five years ago against the government. The conflict has taken 3.3 million lives, according to the aid group International Rescue Committee.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,Los Angeles Times | October 31, 2008
GOMA, Congo - An uneasy calm returned to this battered Congolese city yesterday as a tenuous cease-fire halted clashes and residents struggled to resume their regular lives. Many of the thousands of panicked people who fled regional displacement camps a day earlier and stormed into Goma, a city in northeastern Democratic Republic of Congo, began traveling back to nearby camps. In contrast to Wednesday's stampede, when people feared rebels were in hot pursuit, the return trip was a somber procession, with weary people of all ages carrying mattresses, blankets and wood kindling toward an uncertain future.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 6, 1994
KIGALI, Rwanda -- The numbers that have come out of the destruction of Rwanda are so big as to be numbing: 2.7 million refugees, 1 million in Goma, Zaire, alone, 500,000 dead in massacres.Those would be bad enough emerging from one of the world's most populous nations. That Rwanda's relatively small 7.5 million people have produced them makes them all the more horrifying.But where do those numbers come from? How reliable are they? How can anyone look at a vast crowd of refugees and say that there are a million of them?
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 17, 1996
GOMA, Zaire -- The flow of Hutu refugees back to their homes in Rwanda increased yesterday to numbers so large as nearly to defy the imagination.The line of humanity packed a two-lane road shoulder-to-shoulder, stretched through Goma and for more than 10 miles into Zaire. Those in that slowly moving line walked like an inexorable force into the Rwandan border town of Gisenyi and then beyond, toward their home villages."There is no question that we are overwhelmed," said Ray Wilkinson, spokesman for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 16, 1996
GISENYI, Rwanda -- The Hutus began swarming home to Rwanda yesterday, taking an anxious world by surprise.By the tens of thousands they left war- and disease-ridden eastern Zaire in a mass migration rivaled only by their flight in the opposite direction two years ago.They came in numbers that were too high to count, perhaps reaching into the hundreds of thousands, walking through the streets of the Zaire town of Goma to a small border crossing where the...
TOPIC
By Carter Dougherty and Carter Dougherty,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 10, 2003
GOMA, Congo -- For Didier Abonge, a telephone link between this city on the border with Rwanda and the capital, Kinshasa, means that the Democratic Republic of Congo's civil war is over. A marketing manager for a mobile telephone company, Abonge has arrived in Goma with blue-and-orange billboards, T-shirts and leaflets to sell service in the town where rebels began a war five years ago against the government. The conflict has taken 3.3 million lives, according to the aid group International Rescue Committee.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2002
In the black lava that has formed a wall of rock through the port city of Goma, relief workers and experts hope to find a silver lining - the beginning of an end to the long and bloody civil war that has ravaged the Democratic Republic of Congo far longer than the volcanic eruption. Some who have watched and worked in Africa's third-largest country for years say the eruption of Mount Nyiragongo Jan. 17 might prompt new cooperation in what has seemed an irreconcilable dispute among rebels, government forces and ethnic factions.
NEWS
January 24, 2002
THIS IS A DISASTER of Old Testament proportions: A lakeside resort city is overrun by Tutsi and Hutu refugees from genocide in a neighboring country; a rebellion ensues; rebels seize control; and a fiery river of lava cleaves the land in two. Food supplies from the United Nations arrived in Goma this week; the international community is helping, as it should. But President Joseph Kabila of the Democratic Republic of the Congo has said he wants aid to bypass the city's rebel commanders.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 17, 1996
GOMA, Zaire -- The flow of Hutu refugees back to their homes in Rwanda increased yesterday to numbers so large as nearly to defy the imagination.The line of humanity packed a two-lane road shoulder-to-shoulder, stretched through Goma and for more than 10 miles into Zaire. Those in that slowly moving line walked like an inexorable force into the Rwandan border town of Gisenyi and then beyond, toward their home villages."There is no question that we are overwhelmed," said Ray Wilkinson, spokesman for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 16, 1996
GISENYI, Rwanda -- The Hutus began swarming home to Rwanda yesterday, taking an anxious world by surprise.By the tens of thousands they left war- and disease-ridden eastern Zaire in a mass migration rivaled only by their flight in the opposite direction two years ago.They came in numbers that were too high to count, perhaps reaching into the hundreds of thousands, walking through the streets of the Zaire town of Goma to a small border crossing where the...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 3, 1996
GOMA, Zaire -- The town of Goma fell to Zairian rebels and Rwandan troops yesterday, leading the United Nations to evacuate its foreign staff and thus leaving hundreds of thousands of refugees in nearby camps with only a few days' supply of food and warfare raging all around them.The evacuation of relief workers and the severing of food supply lines by the fighting is a disaster for the refugees of the Hutu ethnic group who have been living in camps around Goma for two years. The rebels are members of the Tutsi group, which controls the Rwandan army that the refugees fled into Zaire to escape.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 26, 2005
GOMA, Congo - Unidentified militia fighters ambushed and killed nine U.N. peacekeepers yesterday in the volatile Ituri region of eastern Congo. It was the worst attack in the six years of the mission and a sign of continued instability ahead of planned nationwide elections. The nine soldiers were Bangladeshis on a foot patrol near the town of Kafe, about 20 miles northwest of Bunia, the capital of Ituri province. They were protecting a nearby camp housing thousands of people who fled their villages in recent weeks because of attacks by militias.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 22, 1994
GOMA, Zaire -- Death struck yesterday with a vengeance.More than 800 bodies of Rwandan refugees, many of them wrapped in straw mats or pieces of cloth, were laid out along a three-mile stretch of road from the center of Goma to Munigi, a volcanic expanse.At Munigi, a small boy walked barefoot across the rocky ground carrying a bundle in his arms. Wrapped inside the dirty piece of cloth was his little sister.As he laid her gently on the volcanic rock, a few tears running down his face, two men carried a woman in a blue and yellow striped shirt and pleated skirt by the arms and legs.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 6, 1994
KIGALI, Rwanda -- The numbers that have come out of the destruction of Rwanda are so big as to be numbing: 2.7 million refugees, 1 million in Goma, Zaire, alone, 500,000 dead in massacres.Those would be bad enough emerging from one of the world's most populous nations. That Rwanda's relatively small 7.5 million people have produced them makes them all the more horrifying.But where do those numbers come from? How reliable are they? How can anyone look at a vast crowd of refugees and say that there are a million of them?
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 31, 1994
KIGALI, Rwanda -- They are coming back now, walking with their heads laden with bags and mats and food, slowly returning to the killing field they fled.Their flight to Zaire had brought only a different kind of misery -- disease and starvation that killed them by the thousands.They come along the winding mountain roads that lead into this capital city, once home to more than 700,000 people. A few days ago, it seemed nearly deserted.By the end of last week, though, the markets were filling again with the sounds of commerce and the streets were beginning to come alive, even if the buildings remained mostly vacant, their windows shattered, their walls pockmarked with bullet holes.
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