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By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | June 12, 1992
What John T. Golle couldn't get the public schools to do for his own sons, he thinks he can do for thousands of schoolchildren across the country.Mr. Golle was prosperous. His sons went to good schools in a well-to-do Minneapolis suburb. Yet he still couldn't find a way to get the public schools to provide the individual attention he felt his sons needed."I have a learning-disabled son, one of those kids who fell between the cracks and today appears on someone's chart as a statistic," Mr. Golle said in a telephone interview from the Minneapolis headquarters of Education Alternatives Inc., the firm that plans to run nine of Baltimore's public schools.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2012
Robert Alexander "Sandy" Goll, a retired city public school educator who was active in Scouting, died March 12 of sleep apnea at his Rodgers Forge home. He was 63. The son of a manufacturing executive and a homemaker, Mr. Goll was born in Baltimore and raised in Stoneleigh. After graduating from McDonogh School in 1967, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1973 from Norwich University in Northfield, Vt. Mr. Goll taught mathematics for 30 years at Roland Park Middle School and Chinquapin Middle School, from which he retired in 2007.
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NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | June 12, 1992
What John T. Golle couldn't get the public schools to do for his own sons, he thinks he can do for thousands of schoolchildren across the country.Mr. Golle was prosperous. His sons went to good schools in a well-to-do Minneapolis suburb. Yet he still couldn't find a way to get the public schools to provide the individual attention he felt his sons needed."I have a learning-disabled son, one of those kids who fell between the cracks and today appears on someone's chart as a statistic," Mr. Golle said in a telephone interview from the Minneapolis headquarters of Education Alternatives Inc., the firm that plans to run nine of Baltimore's public schools.
EXPLORE
October 11, 2011
Collaboration between McDaniel professor Sue Bloom, Westminster physician Dr. Dean Griffin and McDaniel College will bring a special talk on the western art of E. William Gollings to the college's Peterson Hall on Thursday, Oct. 13, at 7 p.m. The premier authority on Gollings' work, Dr. William Ward, will speak. The event is free and open to all. "The lecturer is a friend of mine from Wyoming," said Griffin said in an email interview. "Last year I traveled to Wyoming to hear him give this lecture to a group from the Cowboy Hall of Fame Museum in Oklahoma City.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writer | June 13, 1992
For a mayor who has staked his political career on improving city schools, the idea of hiring a private firm to do the job might seem risky business. But Kurt L. Schmoke didn't see it that way.The concept "never bothered me in the least," the mayor said matter-of-factly. What did concern him, however, was the fact that a "for-profit" company wanted the chance to manage several city schools. "To what extent was this driven by a desire to achieve educational excellence as opposed to achieving profits?"
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | October 1, 1992
NEW YORK -- Financial burdens from a pilot school in Arizona caused the head of Education Alternatives Inc., which manages nine Baltimore public schools, to sell 100,000 shares of his company's stock.Chairman John T. Golle said yesterday that he sold the stock because he is holding $1.9 million in debt on the Tesseract School in Paradise Valley, Ariz., and needs to improve his personal liquidity.The privately run elementary school opened three years and has not shown a profit, though Mr. Golle said its cash flow was now neutral.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | March 1, 1994
Education Alternatives Inc., responding to a lawsuit filed by two investors, defended its accounting practices yesterday, saying it complies with industry standards.The suit, filed Feb. 23 in federal district court in Minneapolis, charges that the company, which runs nine Baltimore schools, used irregular accounting methods and made unfulfilled promises to boost the company's stock price last fall.But John T. Golle, EAI's chairman and chief executive, said the company has fully disclosed its accounting practices in Securities and Exchange Commission filings.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1995
Education Alternatives Inc.'s grand experiment in school privatization took a mortal blow yesterday, leaving a two-part question unanswered after the company's rocky 3 1/2 years in Baltimore:Did EAI, a profit-making company, improve public education in Baltimore -- and make a profit in the bargain?EAI and its irrepressible chief, John Golle, still say yes -- and yes. But Tuesday, even as Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and the school board were preparing to administer the coup de grace, Mr. Golle was insisting that his company had never earned the money his foes had claimed in Baltimore and that the mayor and city finance officials, in insisting on a $7 million reduction in EAI's contract, had based their analysis on "capricious and erroneous information."
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1995
On the eve of contract talks destined to alter Baltimore's financial relationship with Education Alternatives Inc., Mayor Kurt Schmoke yesterday held to a hard-line stance that the city pays too much for EAI's services."
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Ian Johnson and Gary Gately and Ian Johnson,Staff Writers | January 27, 1994
Education Alternatives Inc. and the Baltimore school system have resolved differences in student enrollment counts, but the company stills owes the city $338,500 it received based on overstated enrollment at "Tesseract" schools, city officials said yesterday.The city concluded three weeks ago that EAI owed about $500,000 based on overstated enrollment, but the figure was reduced to $338,500 yesterday based on a revised state audit.EAI has continued challenging the enrollment numbers and for the past two days has sought a further "adjustment" that would erase at least part of the $338,500 debt.
NEWS
December 31, 2003
On Saturday, December 20, 2003, ANN ELIZABETH GOLL, 81, died at St. Joseph Medical Center of Towson following hip surgery. Formerly of Roland Park and Stoneleigh, she was a resident of Edenwald in Towson. Born Ann Elizabeth Losey outside of Buffalo, NY, her family moved to Roland Park when she was an infant. Mrs. Goll was a graduate of Western High School where she enjoyed singing operatic solos with the glee club. She also sang in the Grace church choir and on a popular radio program of the day. She continued her education at the Peabody Conservatory and Strayer Business College.
NEWS
November 24, 1995
MAYOR KURT L. SCHMOKE, an early supporter of Education Alternatives Inc., hadn't counted on this. One reason he felt comfortable giving teachers a big pay raise this year was belief EAI would agree to a reduction in its $44 million fee. He negotiated for weeks thinking an agreement would occur. When it became apparent that it wouldn't, he found himself painted into a corner he helped create. The teachers had their raise. Settling a special education lawsuit was costly. The legislature was withholding millions.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1995
Education Alternatives Inc.'s grand experiment in school privatization took a mortal blow yesterday, leaving a two-part question unanswered after the company's rocky 3 1/2 years in Baltimore:Did EAI, a profit-making company, improve public education in Baltimore -- and make a profit in the bargain?EAI and its irrepressible chief, John Golle, still say yes -- and yes. But Tuesday, even as Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and the school board were preparing to administer the coup de grace, Mr. Golle was insisting that his company had never earned the money his foes had claimed in Baltimore and that the mayor and city finance officials, in insisting on a $7 million reduction in EAI's contract, had based their analysis on "capricious and erroneous information."
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1995
On the eve of contract talks destined to alter Baltimore's financial relationship with Education Alternatives Inc., Mayor Kurt Schmoke yesterday held to a hard-line stance that the city pays too much for EAI's services."
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,Sun Staff Writer | June 26, 1995
Baltimore and Education Alternatives Inc. officials began contract renegotiations last week with a meeting to outline key ,, concerns.The topics omitted are as interesting as those agreed upon as negotiating points: Improved curriculum and increased control over staff, which EAI managers frequently have stated as issues, will not be the focus of the discussions.Instead, the city will seek during the next three weeks to tie the company's profits to student achievement. Also, changes will be sought in the formula used to determine EAI's cut of the total school budget, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said last week.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and James Bock and Mike Bowler and James Bock,Sun Staff Writers | June 9, 1995
Education Alternatives Inc., the company managing nine Baltimore public schools, wants to change the way it is paid when it renegotiates a five-year contract with the city.John T. Golle, EAI's chief executive, said yesterday the company wants to be paid by the city on the basis of its actual costs in managing the schools rather than the systemwide average cost per pupil, which is $5,847 this year. EAI pays back the city 7.5 percent to cover administrative costs.The Minneapolis company has been criticized for having more money to spend, on average, than other Baltimore schools, and company officials believe a different financing method would be easier for the public to understand.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | April 13, 1995
Two Carroll County men who rammed their car into a parked train, killing one of them and seriously injuring the other, wrote in a co-signed suicide note that they were HIV positive after repeatedly using intravenous drugs, sources close to the investigation said yesterday.In the note, found in the mangled Pontiac T-1000 car, Edward E. Stultz, 40, and John M. Curran, 32, apologized to family members for trouble they caused because of their drug use, the sources said.Mr. Stultz, the driver, was killed immediately in Monday afternoon's crash at the Lehigh Portland Cement Co. in Union Bridge.
NEWS
November 24, 1995
MAYOR KURT L. SCHMOKE, an early supporter of Education Alternatives Inc., hadn't counted on this. One reason he felt comfortable giving teachers a big pay raise this year was belief EAI would agree to a reduction in its $44 million fee. He negotiated for weeks thinking an agreement would occur. When it became apparent that it wouldn't, he found himself painted into a corner he helped create. The teachers had their raise. Settling a special education lawsuit was costly. The legislature was withholding millions.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Gary Gately and Mike Bowler and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writers | June 6, 1995
To Walter G. Amprey, John T. Golle is a visionary. To John Golle, Walter Amprey is a visionary.Together, they have told each other repeatedly over the past three years, they would change the face of American education.The superintendent of Baltimore's troubled schools and the salesman who says he can rescue them share both a philosophy and a friendship. "Some-times we think we were brought together by perhaps a higher being, and maybe it was meant to be," says Mr. Golle, the Min-nesota businessman whose company manages nine Baltimore schools.
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