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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1996
First, the young man complimented James Dalaney on his approach shot to the 13th green at Clifton Park Golf Course. Then he pulled a knife and demanded money."
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NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2003
Steve Reeves knows the feeling well: an inescapable sense that no matter what he does or thinks, the little white ball will not roll where he so desperately wants it to. "It's very easy to convince yourself that you're going to miss a putt," says Reeves, 44, a former club pro who is now marketing director at River Downs Golf Club in Finksburg. "It's like walking in quicksand. The more you struggle, the deeper you go." Almost everyone, from Olympic athletes to public speakers, goes through the humbling experience Reeves describes: crumbling under pressure - or, as it's more brutally known, choking.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | August 21, 1991
No group was more deprived than Baltimore City golfers. It was that way for years, even decades, a deplorable time when they paid fees to play the public courses, were subjected to inferior conditions and got little consideration.Pine Ridge, Mount Pleasant, Clifton Park, Forest Park and Carroll Park were decent enough facilities but maintenance was hit-or-miss. Minimal at best. The city administrations, then as now, lacked funds to keep them in first-rate condition. Doug Tawney, then the director of Parks and Recreation, was a miracle worker in stretching what little money was available.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | October 13, 2005
An editorial in a recent issue of National Geographic Traveler magazine complained that kayakers in Maine found "residential development" near national parks and urged its readers to use their "influence" to prevent such things. "You are the stakeholders in our national parks," it said. Really? What stake do kayakers and others of like mind have that is not also a stake held by people who build the vacation homes whose presence offends the kayak set? Homeowners are just as much citizens and taxpayers as kayakers are, and they are even entitled to equal treatment under the 14th Amendment.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | September 16, 1994
LAKE MANASSAS, Va. -- It's immediately apparent that the grand and regal ambition behind the concept of staging a golf tournament with a special identity, known as the Presidents Cup, is designed to separate it from the rest of the pack.This is not the Phoenix Open, the Federal Express St. Jude Classic or any of the other myriad of regular PGA Tour stops played almost weekly across the face of America's golf landscape. If that was the idea, to just be another event, the staging area would not be the prestigious Robert Trent Jones Golf Club.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | November 27, 1991
Just because it hasn't been tried before is no reason for Carroll Pifer to back away from what he believes will be a smart business deal for all concerned. Good for himself, the resort he represents and those willing to avail themselves of the opportunity to play a round of golf for $25 and then be awarded a free night of lodging in a nearby motel.Pifer took an advertisement in The Sunday Sun, included his courtesy long-distance telephone number, and spelled out an unprecedented offer that has drawn overwhelming response even if the early reaction is one of anticipated doubt.
FEATURES
By Suzin Boddiford and Suzin Boddiford,Special to The Sun | June 22, 1995
They say that a bad day on the golf course beats a good day at the office.However, fashion on the fairways has been known to disappoint. Fortunately, there's a new drive to change all that. The shift can be attributed to the influx of stylish athletes, celebrity enthusiasts and a whole generation of baby boomers who want to bring style up to par with comfort and performance.According to the National Golf Foundation, 37 percent of all new golfers are women. Add to that a growing interest among younger players and more participation by seniors, and it's no wonder golf has become the fastest growing sport in America.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Sun | June 25, 2008
Casey Amos Groundskeeper Queenstown Harbor, Queenstown Salary: $10.50 an hour Age: 24 Years on the job : Two How she got started : After working in office and customer-service-related jobs, Amos wanted to work outdoors. She decided to try her hand at landscaping and was hired to maintain the flower beds at the 735-acre Queenstown Harbor golf course. "I just kind of gave it a shot. The job evolved from there." Typical day : For the first three or four hours each morning, starting at 6 a.m., she is one of about 20 groundskeepers who mow the greens and fairways.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | June 11, 1997
BETHESDA -- For those who couldn't make it, here's a brief summation of what everyone was talking about during yesterday's practice round at the U.S. Open:Tiger, Tiger, Tiger, Tiger, Tiger, Tiger, Tiger, Tiger, Tiger, Tiger, Tiger (and a few other things for 30 seconds).Approximately three of the 25,000 fans at Congressional Country Club weren't following Tiger Woods around the course during his morning round.Approximately four of the dozens of questions asked of numerous golfers at many news conferences weren't about whether Tiger was a good golfer and/or a cool guy.Defending Open champion Steve Jones followed Woods into the interview room shortly after noon, and it was as if he came in announcing that the media buffet had just opened.
NEWS
By LOWELL E. SUNDERLAND | October 5, 2003
IT SEEMED like a winner of an idea, but, surprise, the concept of a two-day tournament to determine the best Howard County male and female amateur golfers has, to apply a term from the sport, plopped in a hazard. In fact, the tournament intended to be played next weekend at the county-owned Timbers of Troy Golf Course in Elkridge may be canceled in a meeting tomorrow at the Department of Recreation and Parks. The reason? Lack of interest. "We said when we announced the tournament back in August that we didn't know exactly what to expect," Kyle Warfield, the general manager and head pro at Timbers said last Tuesday.
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