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NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1996
Arnold Palmer Golf has taken over operation of the Crofton Country Club and plans a $1.2 million renovation of the course and club buildings. The firm plans to open the club to golfers paying daily fees as well as members when the work is complete.The Orlando-based company announced the takeover Friday after signing a 30-year lease with club owner Bill Berkshire.Palmer Golf will hold a tournament at the course after the renovations are completed next year, said Bill Hunscher, senior vice president of corporate development with the company.
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SPORTS
By Teddy Greenstein, Tribune Newspapers | June 13, 2011
Bubba Watson can't help himself. He knows only one way to answer questions, and that's to utter the first thing that pops into his head. After he completed a morning practice round Monday at Congressional Country Club, he was asked if he had enjoyed seeing anything particular on the golf course. "The clubhouse," he replied. "I'm gonna eat lunch. " Watson also didn't give the conventional answer to the question dogging American golfers: Why can't any of them win a major?
SPORTS
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
In the off-season, when the Baltimore Ravens' Torrey Smith isn't trying to refinish his floors, he's lobbying Congress. The wide-receiver headed to Washington Wednesday with the hopes of convicing lawmakers to help America stop being so fat and sluggish. Smith was there, with a contigent of other star athletes, seeking support for the "Get America Moving" program. Leading the charge was the Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association, a group that apparently hopes America, as it "gets moving," buys a lot of balls, bats and cup protectors to do it. On Twitter Wednesday morning Smith, immediately after asking for recommendations for someone who can refinish wood floors at a good price, said the idea of Washington made him "feel important haha.
NEWS
By Blair Holley and Blair Holley,Special to The Sun | September 4, 1994
It's September already and time to get ready for the great golf offered in the so-called "shoulder" season.Pine Shore Golf offered its bunch of weekly scramble tournaments, which are open to anyone by calling (410) 641-5100.In the Sunday Morning Tournament, 23 golfers played in the 18-hole event. The winners with an 8-under-par score of 52 were Rocky Netta, Dana Cooper, John Wyatt and Virgil Cave.Monday evening it's just a nine-holer, and 18 players competed. First place wound up in a tie involving the quartet of Jeff Irving, Bob McIntyre, Joe Foley and Bill Ratliff, and the threesome of Ed Hoeck, John Mathews and Augie Wirths.
NEWS
By George Taylor | September 15, 1991
The best and worst of Carroll County golfers -- who are they, where are they and how accurate are their handicaps?History shows therenever has been a flawless system for handicapping golf. Therefore, the digits spewed out by computers in the pro shop don't necessarily reflect a golfer's abilities.What's more, since the reporting of scores to the handicap committee is self-governed, there are two approaches which can cloud the issue.One is by those players who tend to enter only their better scores and, thereby, gain the prestige status of a low handicap golfer.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2003
Steve Reeves knows the feeling well: an inescapable sense that no matter what he does or thinks, the little white ball will not roll where he so desperately wants it to. "It's very easy to convince yourself that you're going to miss a putt," says Reeves, 44, a former club pro who is now marketing director at River Downs Golf Club in Finksburg. "It's like walking in quicksand. The more you struggle, the deeper you go." Almost everyone, from Olympic athletes to public speakers, goes through the humbling experience Reeves describes: crumbling under pressure - or, as it's more brutally known, choking.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | August 21, 1991
No group was more deprived than Baltimore City golfers. It was that way for years, even decades, a deplorable time when they paid fees to play the public courses, were subjected to inferior conditions and got little consideration.Pine Ridge, Mount Pleasant, Clifton Park, Forest Park and Carroll Park were decent enough facilities but maintenance was hit-or-miss. Minimal at best. The city administrations, then as now, lacked funds to keep them in first-rate condition. Doug Tawney, then the director of Parks and Recreation, was a miracle worker in stretching what little money was available.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | March 11, 2002
FIVE WEEKS from now, a man named Chris Cain will step on a golf course at Penn State University and try to boldly go where no golfer has gone before. In an astounding display of masochism, Cain will attempt to enter the Guinness Book of Records for the most golf holes played in 12 hours using a cart. For the uninitiated, an average round of golf takes about four hours, after which most golfers want nothing so much as to sit in a quiet room with a fifth of Jim Beam to calm their jangled nerves.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | October 13, 2005
An editorial in a recent issue of National Geographic Traveler magazine complained that kayakers in Maine found "residential development" near national parks and urged its readers to use their "influence" to prevent such things. "You are the stakeholders in our national parks," it said. Really? What stake do kayakers and others of like mind have that is not also a stake held by people who build the vacation homes whose presence offends the kayak set? Homeowners are just as much citizens and taxpayers as kayakers are, and they are even entitled to equal treatment under the 14th Amendment.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | September 16, 1994
LAKE MANASSAS, Va. -- It's immediately apparent that the grand and regal ambition behind the concept of staging a golf tournament with a special identity, known as the Presidents Cup, is designed to separate it from the rest of the pack.This is not the Phoenix Open, the Federal Express St. Jude Classic or any of the other myriad of regular PGA Tour stops played almost weekly across the face of America's golf landscape. If that was the idea, to just be another event, the staging area would not be the prestigious Robert Trent Jones Golf Club.
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