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By Larry Guest and Larry Guest,Orlando Sentinel | November 22, 1994
For the last couple of months, I've repeatedly bragged on pro golfers for keeping their feet on the ground, maintaining a healthy perspective, while pro athletes all around them were self-destructing in an orgy of greed.Silly me.Along comes something called the World Golf Tour, grandly and prematurely unveiled the other day by "commissioner" Greg Norman and Fox-TV Sports. This has the smell of a palace coup, a takeover of the asylum by the wealthiest of the inmates who are proving that baseball and basketball aren't the only ones who don't have a sense of when enough is enough.
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SPORTS
By Matt Slovin and The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2012
Rij Patel is every golf coach's nightmare. His swing is as unconventional as they come. Rij describes it as "weird" and "bad," and it's enough to make nearby golfers do a double take. But their amusement turns to awe as his contorted clubface finally straightens itself out at the last possible moment before impact. Rij is also every coach's dream. As metal meets ball, one can't help but wonder how such power comes from the Rij's frame - small, even for a 14-year-old. He's mature beyond his years, is intelligent and spends much of his time practicing at Hunt Valley Golf Club, where he and his parents belong.
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SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | November 21, 1994
On Dec. 17, Fox Sports will celebrate the first anniversary of the biggest acquisition in sports broadcasting history, the lifting of NFL telecasts from CBS -- a rights holder for 38 years.That heist alone was enough to shake the industry to its foundation, but the new kids in town have hardly stopped there.Since football kicked off in September, Fox has made forays into professional hockey and now golf, with last week's announcement that it will sponsor and televise a new World Golf Tour that seeks to challenge the PGA.In the process, Fox has again defied conventional wisdom and left many wondering what's next.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | June 15, 2008
Like many fathers, Robert Wilson wanted to find the best venue for teaching his son Brandon how to be the best man he could grow up to be. One day while playing with his son, the answer came to him. "Brandon was only 20 months old when he swung a golf club for the first time," said Wilson, 47. "But he hit the ball. By the time he was 30 months old, Brandon went to the driving range and hit the ball in the air every time. I thought maybe there was something to this." With Wilson's passion for golf, and Brandon's talent, a golf course seemed the natural place where Robert Wilson could teach the youngster not only golf, but life's lessons.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | June 15, 2008
Like many fathers, Robert Wilson wanted to find the best venue for teaching his son Brandon how to be the best man he could grow up to be. One day while playing with his son, the answer came to him. "Brandon was only 20 months old when he swung a golf club for the first time," said Wilson, 47. "But he hit the ball. By the time he was 30 months old, Brandon went to the driving range and hit the ball in the air every time. I thought maybe there was something to this." With Wilson's passion for golf, and Brandon's talent, a golf course seemed the natural place where Robert Wilson could teach the youngster not only golf, but life's lessons.
SPORTS
By Matt Slovin and The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2012
Rij Patel is every golf coach's nightmare. His swing is as unconventional as they come. Rij describes it as "weird" and "bad," and it's enough to make nearby golfers do a double take. But their amusement turns to awe as his contorted clubface finally straightens itself out at the last possible moment before impact. Rij is also every coach's dream. As metal meets ball, one can't help but wonder how such power comes from the Rij's frame - small, even for a 14-year-old. He's mature beyond his years, is intelligent and spends much of his time practicing at Hunt Valley Golf Club, where he and his parents belong.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2005
Michelle Wie has spent much of her life in some sort of spotlight, whether it meant being the only girl on her youth baseball team back home in Hawaii or being the only female in the field last year at a PGA Tour event - and nearly making the cut. "I always wanted to do un-normal things," the 15-year-old Wie said earlier this year. This week, she will find herself in a familiar place as the first amateur to play in the history of the McDonald's LPGA Championship, which began in 1955. Wie, who began playing in professional tournaments when she was 12 and has now played in 20 events on the LPGA Tour, is in some ways already the biggest attraction in women's golf.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | October 13, 2007
Is it just me or does anyone else wonder what Michelle Wie's life would have been like if she had played on her high school golf team instead of trying to play with adults? Wie, who turned 18 on Thursday, is an exceptional talent, to be sure, and might, at some point, become for the women's golf tour what Tiger Woods has become for men's golf. But it's also increasingly obvious that she has been rushed onto the world stage before her game and her ability to process the highs and lows of the game are ready.
SPORTS
July 23, 1998
Name: Tony PancakeClub: Baltimore Country ClubAge: 35Born: Columbus, Ind.Years a professional: 15Years at present club: First yearCareer highlights: As a player, played in the PGA of America club professional championship one year. During nine years in the PGA's Kentucky section, he held every office, including president, and numbers the section's professional-of-the-year honor among several awards. He developed a Kentucky Junior Golf Tour and was the head professional at Valhalla GC outside of Louisville when the PGA Championship was held there two years ago.Tip: In this day of everybody going for distance, I encourage players not to forget the short game.
SPORTS
By John Stewart | May 21, 1991
WESTMINSTER -- James Watterson made Wakefield Valley Golf Club a stopping-off point between a professional United States Golf Tour event in Rocky Mount, N.C., and his home in Pittsburgh, and made it pay off yesterday.Watterson, 27, shot 68-76144, to win the medal in local qualifying for the U.S. Open championship.His morning round of 4-under-par 68 left him two shots clear of the field and he got to 6-under with an eagle-3 at the 519-yard White-7, before "three-putting my way home," as he described it.Jack Skilling felt his game was suited to the harder Wakefield Valley course (as opposed to Mount Vernon CC, the local Washington area site)
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2005
Michelle Wie has spent much of her life in some sort of spotlight, whether it meant being the only girl on her youth baseball team back home in Hawaii or being the only female in the field last year at a PGA Tour event - and nearly making the cut. "I always wanted to do un-normal things," the 15-year-old Wie said earlier this year. This week, she will find herself in a familiar place as the first amateur to play in the history of the McDonald's LPGA Championship, which began in 1955. Wie, who began playing in professional tournaments when she was 12 and has now played in 20 events on the LPGA Tour, is in some ways already the biggest attraction in women's golf.
SPORTS
By Larry Guest and Larry Guest,Orlando Sentinel | November 22, 1994
For the last couple of months, I've repeatedly bragged on pro golfers for keeping their feet on the ground, maintaining a healthy perspective, while pro athletes all around them were self-destructing in an orgy of greed.Silly me.Along comes something called the World Golf Tour, grandly and prematurely unveiled the other day by "commissioner" Greg Norman and Fox-TV Sports. This has the smell of a palace coup, a takeover of the asylum by the wealthiest of the inmates who are proving that baseball and basketball aren't the only ones who don't have a sense of when enough is enough.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | November 21, 1994
On Dec. 17, Fox Sports will celebrate the first anniversary of the biggest acquisition in sports broadcasting history, the lifting of NFL telecasts from CBS -- a rights holder for 38 years.That heist alone was enough to shake the industry to its foundation, but the new kids in town have hardly stopped there.Since football kicked off in September, Fox has made forays into professional hockey and now golf, with last week's announcement that it will sponsor and televise a new World Golf Tour that seeks to challenge the PGA.In the process, Fox has again defied conventional wisdom and left many wondering what's next.
SPORTS
September 28, 1996
BaseballBrewers: All coaches will return in 1997.Cardinals: Added P John Frascatore to 40-man roster.Expos: P Pedro Martinez appealed eight-game suspension for charging mound.BasketballHawks: Signed G Eldridge Recasner.Nets: Named Kenny Gattison assistant coach. Signed G Trevor Ruffin and C William Cunningham.FootballColts: Signed LB Phil Yeboah-Kodie to practice squad.GolfPGA Tour: Caddie Mike "Fluff" Cowan left Peter Jacobsen after 18 years to work for Tiger Woods.HockeyCoyotes: LW Igor Korolev left camp.
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