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NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | October 24, 1991
For a mayor besieged with gloomy budget news, an item that appeared before the Baltimore Board of Estimates yesterday must have seemed like the sun breaking through a heavy bank of clouds.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, who has been spending a lot of time these days agonizing over million-dollar cuts to the budget, announced that the Baltimore Municipal Golf Corp. will build a $400,000 clubhouse at the city's Clifton Park golf course.And the corporation -- a non-profit organization that runs the city's four municipal golf courses under a no-cost, 15-year lease -- also intends to give the city $225,000 annually to help pay transportation costs for children in recreation programs who qualify for out-of-town sports tournaments.
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NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2002
First, he took on the city's pension boards. Now Mayor Martin O'Malley is taking on the golf board. O'Malley, showing disdain for what he called the board's "country club" mentality, angrily urged the Baltimore Municipal Golf Corp. yesterday to raise greens fees at the city's five public courses to provide more funding for programs for Baltimore's youth. His comments laced with class-conscious rhetoric, O'Malley told the stunned executive director of the private nonprofit group that he was furious that the board would raise green fees to pay for golf course improvements -- as it did Jan. 1 -- but not to increase its contributions to public programs for children.
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NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Michael A. Fletcher and Joan Jacobson and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | October 23, 1991
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and the private corporation that runs the city's golf courses today ended their dispute over the corporation's profits by establishing a $225,000 annual fund for children's recreation programs.The agreement, approved today by the Board of Estimates, amends a 15-year lease signed in 1985 that turned over the city's five golf courses to the Baltimore Municipal Golf Corp.The agreement by the golf corporation to pay into the fund would begin next July and could be renegotiated every five years, beginning in 1996.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2001
When Billy Wingerd made his historic run in the Maryland State Amateur golf championships, a cranky crow at Congressional Country Club unnerved one of his match-play opponents. Wingerd's caddie rolled his eyes. "Billy's used to playing Clifton Park," said Bill Wingerd, who looped for his son at Congressional, which is 50 miles from Clifton as that crow flies but a couple of solar systems over in the golf universe. "You're dealing with sirens and traffic cutting through Clifton, and this guy's complaining about a crow?"
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Evening Sun Staff | September 30, 1991
The non-profit group that manages Baltimore's municipal golf courses is accusing the city of holding it "hostage" by refusing to approve construction projects at the courses.William L. Cook II, executive director of the Baltimore Municipal Golf Corp., said he thinks the city's refusal to act is prompted by his organization's refusal to share its profits with the city.Cook said the company is contacting golfers and posting a notice at city golf courses that says, "The City of Baltimore holds the Baltimore Municipal Golf Corporation hostage."
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1995
By moving to sever its contract with the nonprofit corporation that runs the five municipal golf courses, Baltimore wants to get more of the money generated by greens fees and cart rentals for youth recreation programs, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said yesterday.In comments that echoed his move to gain control of funds raised for the Artscape summer festival several years ago and over the convention board last spring, Mr. Schmoke also said that Baltimore Municipal Golf Corp. needed to be more accountable to his administration.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Evening Sun Staff | August 1, 1991
Six years ago, five city-owned golf courses were draining the city treasury, so then-Mayor William Donald Schaefer decided to lease them to a private corporation for free.The courses, under the management of the Baltimore Municipal Golf Corporation, have become so successful that they made more than $800,000 in profit last year.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has asked the golf corporation to share some of the money with the city so it can be used for the city's understaffed, decaying recreation centers.
NEWS
October 25, 1991
When the city leased its golf courses to a non-profit corporation in 1985, it never dreamed it would one day clamor to get money back. After all, the idea was to rid the city of a perennial financial drag; the five city-owned golf courses were losing about $500,000 a year -- a direct drain on the city budget.With some smart management changes, the Baltimore Municipal Golf Corporation improved the courses, attracted more golfers, quickly paid back its city loans and began to generate surplus revenues it could plow back into its facilities and programs.
NEWS
August 2, 1991
Once again, Baltimore city is in a bind that grows out of the secretive machinations of the Schaefer administration. Now, on the heels of a prolonged and costly legal and political battle by the city to regain control of nearly $800,000 raised for the annual Artscape festival, comes the fallout from another blunder.Six years ago, with the city's golf courses losing money and draining the economy, the Schaefer administration decided to make a deal: It leased the courses for 15 years, at no charge, to the Baltimore Municipal Golf Corporation.
NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | September 12, 1991
The non-profit organization that runs the city-owned golf courses says it wants to build a new clubhouse at Clifton Park, one with air-conditioned locker rooms, a new pro shop and a much shorter walk to the golf-cart concession and first tee.But the proposal bogeyed at the Board of Estimates yesterday.Members of the board, who have been frustrated by the Baltimore Municipal Golf Corp.'s refusal to share an $800,000 surplus with the city, said the package cannot be approved before the Public Works Department and parks department look it over.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | August 9, 1998
Young Lee, who had lost a 2-up margin in the last two holes, won the first playoff hole to edge Jacen Martinez in yesterday's ++ conclusion of the first round in the inaugural match play championship of the Baltimore Municipal Golf Corporation.Martinez, who had shot 73 to Lee's 77 in the qualifier at Clifton Park Golf Course two weeks ago, had rallied down the stretch yesterday at Forest Park GC with a par and a birdie to get even, then needed four shots to reach the back of the green at the 338-yard opening hole and eventually yielded to a bogey.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1996
Baltimore has decided not to end its contract with the #F nonprofit corporation that operates the city's five golf courses in exchange for the organization's commitment to provide more money for youth recreation programs.Baltimore Municipal Golf Corp. Executive Director Lynnie Cook said yesterday that the corporation has "agreed in principle" to an increased contribution, although he said the amount and terms still had to be negotiated.City officials notified the corporation last week they have "rescinded" a notice last December calling for an end by July to a long-term agreement with the corporation to manage the courses.
NEWS
December 23, 1995
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke needs more money to provide adequate recreation programs for the city's children. Too many rec centers offer too little. However, his eyeing the municipal golf courses as a source of more funds seems too big a risk. Especially given the manner in which the mayor has decided to go after the money.Mr. Schmoke says he has been unable to get the independent non-profit corporation that for 11 years has run the five courses to willingly give more money to the city. Consequently, Mr. Schmoke wants to end its contract.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1995
By moving to sever its contract with the nonprofit corporation that runs the five municipal golf courses, Baltimore wants to get more of the money generated by greens fees and cart rentals for youth recreation programs, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said yesterday.In comments that echoed his move to gain control of funds raised for the Artscape summer festival several years ago and over the convention board last spring, Mr. Schmoke also said that Baltimore Municipal Golf Corp. needed to be more accountable to his administration.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and John Rivera and Frank D. Roylance and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1995
Baltimore is moving to terminate its contract with the Baltimore Municipal Golf Corp. -- the private, nonprofit group that revived the city's five tattered municipal golf courses a decade ago and made tars. The letter offered no reasons. Corporation Chairman Henry H. Miller has vowed to fight the termination in court."Such a legal battle will be costly to BMGC and the city, and will divert resources that could be better utilized by both entities," Mr. Miller said in a letter responding to the notice from Recreation and Parks Director Marlyn J. Perritt and Public Works chief George G. Balog.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,Sun Staff Writer | October 4, 1994
The talk was of "dedication, discipline and desire equaling achievement," but for 100 inner-city youngsters assembled at Mount Pleasant Golf Course last week, the interest was in hitting a golf ball.This was an informal introduction to a more structured program that would begin the next day, twice-a-week clinics to run for an hour or so after school that will continue for the next four weeks. The children, ages 8 to 13, who were split into two groups of about 50 each, are from the city's Department of Recreation, Druid Hill YMCA and the Paragon Golf Association.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writer | August 26, 1994
Police were searching yesterday for two teen-agers who robbed a pair of golfers at gunpoint Wednesday afternoon as they were playing on a city course in West Baltimore.The youths approached two of four golfers near the women's tee at the sixth hole at the Forest Park Municipal Golf Course and threatened them with a rifle, police said.After stealing $70, the armed youth fired one round down the fairway in the direction of another golfer who yelled out in anattempt to scare them off, one of the victims said yesterday.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Michael A. Fletcher and Patrick Gilbert and Michael A. Fletcher,Sun Staff Writers | April 1, 1994
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said yesterday he opposes construction of a golf course next to Pine Ridge Golf Course in the city-owned Loch Raven watershed.Officials with the Baltimore Municipal Golf Corp., the private, nonprofit group that manages the city's golf courses, said the mayor's action ends their plans for building a second course next to Pine Ridge in Baltimore County, about two miles northeast of Towson.At a news media briefing, Mr. Schmoke said he decided to protect the region's water supply and because he had "concerns about establishing a precedent for development" in the watershed.
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