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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 20, 2002
The Banger Sisters stands as proof that no movie is so bad it can't be redeemed by a single stellar performance. That performance is by Susan Sarandon, who is so believably unleashed as a former groupie learning to embrace her uninhibited past, it's tempting to believe she was reading from a different script when considering the part. Unfortunately, the script she was given to work with isn't much at all. At best, it's a trifle about old rock and rollers struggling to make sense of their misspent youth in light of the wisdom that comes with age. At worst, it's a dangerously simplistic paean to the sort of "anything goes" lifestyle that seemed so quaint and curious and even romantic back in the '60s, but today embraces perils undreamed of in the Summer of Love.
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BUSINESS
December 5, 2004
Holiday home tour of Union Square set for next Sunday Fresh baked cookies and a tour of historic homes will be offered at the 19th annual Union Square Holiday Cookie Tour next week. The walking tour, which is centered on Union Square Park between the 1500 blocks of W. Lombard and Hollins streets, will feature more than 20 homes decorated for the holidays. Participants will receive a different cookie at each house as well as a booklet containing historic information about the home and cookie recipes.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1997
Filmmakers never seem to tire of making films about how hard it was growing up amid the racial turbulence that rocked the Deep South in the early 1960s.The latest to join the ranks is Goldie Hawn, who makes her directorial debut at 8 tonight on TNT with the carefully layered and well-acted "Hope."The film stars Jena Malone, who was so impressive as an abused child in "Bastard Out of Carolina." Malone plays Lilly Kate Burns, a young girl living with her maternal aunt in a small Southern town called Hope.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 20, 2002
The Banger Sisters stands as proof that no movie is so bad it can't be redeemed by a single stellar performance. That performance is by Susan Sarandon, who is so believably unleashed as a former groupie learning to embrace her uninhibited past, it's tempting to believe she was reading from a different script when considering the part. Unfortunately, the script she was given to work with isn't much at all. At best, it's a trifle about old rock and rollers struggling to make sense of their misspent youth in light of the wisdom that comes with age. At worst, it's a dangerously simplistic paean to the sort of "anything goes" lifestyle that seemed so quaint and curious and even romantic back in the '60s, but today embraces perils undreamed of in the Summer of Love.
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By Lou Cedrone | September 26, 1991
* ''Deceived'' A mystery thriller with Goldie Hawn as a woman who may have married the wrong man. John Heard is the man she weds.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 14, 1992
Though its ostensible setting is Key West, the new Goldie Hawn film "Crisscross" really takes place on the isle of moral torpor, in the entropy straits, halfway between being and nothingness, near the tropic of lassitude. This is Joan Didion territory, it's Robert Stone territory -- but it sure isn't Goldie Hawn territory.Hawn plays the stressed-out divorcee of a naval aviator and Skyhawk jock who accidentally planted a 500-pounder in a children's hospital over in 'Nam. Like a plague spreading through the air, the miasma of this original sin infects all who come in touch, particularly the beaten-down Hawn and her somewhat drab son, Chris (David Arnott)
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By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 26, 1992
Oprah Winfrey is about to take on Barbara Walters as queen of the celebrity specials at ABC.ABC will air at least four hour-long segments of "Oprah: Behind the Scenes," a series of prime-time interview specials, the network confirmed yesterday. Producer is Harpo Productions, Ms. Winfrey's Chicago-based company.First up, on May 19 during the ratings "sweeps": Meryl Streep and Goldie Hawn on location of their new flick, "Death Becomes Her"; Dustin Hoffman on the set of his new movie, "Hero," and rocker Michael Bolton backstage at a concert.
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | September 27, 1991
The first scene in "Deceived": It is raining, umbrellas are everywhere, and we know instantly we are in Alfred Hitchcock land.The time is well spent. Goldie Hawn stars. She is an art restorer who marries a young man, has a child by him and for six years enjoys much happiness.But little things threaten the marriage. The husband lies. He's supposed to be in Boston but has been seen in New York. Then there is a credit card that belongs to someone else but is in the man's possession.Meanwhile, there are murders.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | September 27, 1991
"Deceived" won't fool you: It's a piece of trash.Goldie Hawn stars as an art restorer who's been married for five years to a curator (John Heard), by whom she has a daughter. Just when Hawn begins to suspect that her perfect husband is vTC not all she thought, he dies in an automobile accident.Her efforts to collect his insurance benefits lead her to discover that Heard had been using the Social Security number of a man who had died 16 years before. But during her search for her husband's genuine identity, someone ransacks her apartment several times, murdering her au pair girl in the process.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2004
Holiday home tour of Union Square set for next Sunday Fresh baked cookies and a tour of historic homes will be offered at the 19th annual Union Square Holiday Cookie Tour next week. The walking tour, which is centered on Union Square Park between the 1500 blocks of W. Lombard and Hollins streets, will feature more than 20 homes decorated for the holidays. Participants will receive a different cookie at each house as well as a booklet containing historic information about the home and cookie recipes.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 2, 1999
Filmgoers old enough to remember the 1970 movie "The Out of Towners" will recall a harrowing comedy in which Sandy Dennis and Jack Lemmon duked it out with a ruthless New York City where anything that could go wrong, did. The comedy in that version, which was written by Neil Simon, was derived from elements as subtle as a box of Cracker Jacks or as blatant as an exploding manhole cover. No such classic moments emerge from this contemporized version of the movie, although Goldie Hawn and Steve Martin try to distract the audience from the absence of genuine wit. In "The Out-of-Towners" circa 1999, cross-dressing hotel managers and a few silly walks are expected to tide the audience over.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 9, 1999
LONDON -- She sold more books in a single day at Harrods than Margaret Thatcher and drew more media than Cher. She was none other than "that woman," Monica Lewinsky.The White House intern who nearly brought down Bill Clinton's presidency yesterday began the first day of the rest of her life as an international celebrity.And it was lights, cameras, near-chaos as Lewinsky posed for the media and signed copies of her book, "Monica's Story," at Harrods, one of the world's best-known department stores.
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By Nancy Menefee Jackson and Nancy Menefee Jackson,Special to the Sun | March 7, 1999
At 40 minutes into the CardioKnockout class at the Downtown Athletic Club, the unmistakable strains of the theme song from "Rocky" emerge triumphantly from the pulsing beat of the background music.It couldn't be more appropriate as members of the class, wearing boxing gloves and dripping with sweat, do a series of jab-jab-jab-jab-hooks to the beat.Boxing -- and its cousin kickboxing -- may be losing favor as sports, but never have they been more popular as an exercise routine, minus the actual blows.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1998
All George Martin wanted to do was find a day job that would let him make music in the evenings. What he ended up doing was helping revolutionize the world of popular music.From 1962 to 1970, George Martin was the "fifth Beatle," the producer who saw to it that the genius of John, Paul, George and Ringo made it onto vinyl for all the world to hear. His crisp production, not to mention his careful shepherding of the group's talent and energy, played a huge role in creating the second great revolution in rock and roll.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1997
Filmmakers never seem to tire of making films about how hard it was growing up amid the racial turbulence that rocked the Deep South in the early 1960s.The latest to join the ranks is Goldie Hawn, who makes her directorial debut at 8 tonight on TNT with the carefully layered and well-acted "Hope."The film stars Jena Malone, who was so impressive as an abused child in "Bastard Out of Carolina." Malone plays Lilly Kate Burns, a young girl living with her maternal aunt in a small Southern town called Hope.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 17, 1997
Now and then, even the best of us get to phone one in. That's pretty much what Woody Allen does in "Everyone Says I Love You," a movie that seems to lose both its way and its convictions as it wanders along.Not that it's bad. In fact, it's frequently quite amusing as a bunch of charming but over-matched movie personalities uncertainly warble the music of Cole Porter, and others now and then essay a brave little sally into the world of dance. But it'll never make you forget "Singin' in the Rain"; it won't even make you remember it!
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | July 31, 1992
Bob Zemeckis visited the past in "Back to the Future" and rescued animation in "Who Framed Roger Rabbit," but in his new picture he really crosses a frontier: It offers new hope for the dead."
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 20, 1996
Smart and sassy, "The First Wives Club" is funny enough to amuse even the second wives.This is what you call your primo high-concept movie, the idea of which alone is funny; too bad that the somewhat messy and disjointed story wasn't wired together better and that it depends so heavily on the shtick of the stars.Here's the nub: Three sensational women -- Diane Keaton, Goldie Hawn and Bette Midler -- wake up in their late 40s to find themselves reduced but abandoned anyway. Their prosperous husbands have dumped them for younger, shapelier women and left them in lessened circumstances, with kids and messy houses and mortgages and tuitions to pay. They're mad as hell and they're not going to take it anymore!
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | October 1, 1996
BOSTON -- Every once in a while in the history of womankind, a doormat rises off the floor and, breaking all evolutionary speed records, develops a pair of legs to stand on.At this moment, you can be sure, someone asks: Why is she so angry?So too in the history of cinema -- a celluloid time line that has left the bodies of sex bombs or slasher victims all over the cineplex -- there come a few films starring women who fight back. At which point, you can be sure, the movie will be accused of male-bashing.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 20, 1996
Smart and sassy, "The First Wives Club" is funny enough to amuse even the second wives.This is what you call your primo high-concept movie, the idea of which alone is funny; too bad that the somewhat messy and disjointed story wasn't wired together better and that it depends so heavily on the shtick of the stars.Here's the nub: Three sensational women -- Diane Keaton, Goldie Hawn and Bette Midler -- wake up in their late 40s to find themselves reduced but abandoned anyway. Their prosperous husbands have dumped them for younger, shapelier women and left them in lessened circumstances, with kids and messy houses and mortgages and tuitions to pay. They're mad as hell and they're not going to take it anymore!
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