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By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2011
I've really enjoyed the goldfish in my garden pond and would like to keep them over the winter. Other than a heater, what else should I do? Someone said not to feed fish in the winter. Is this correct? Stop feeding goldfish when the water temperature drops below 55 degrees F. This usually occurs in mid- to late November. It's a good idea to install a floating stock tank heater to keep a small portion of the pond free of ice; not for keeping the fish warm — rather to expose the water to air, thus oxygenating the water.
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NEWS
By Donna Beth Joy Shapiro | May 9, 2013
Baltimore used to be a town of colorful public characters. One of them, my father, passed away 40 years ago today. Sam Shapiro was often described as a "perennial" candidate - for mayor in 1967 and 1971 and House of Representatives in 1968 and 1970 - and a political gadfly. His attention-getting campaign schemes included handing out bagged live goldfish tagged with "I'm Fishing For Your Vote" in 1967, holding a 50-cent-a-plate testimonial dinner at Polock Johnny's on The Block in 1971 - advertising it on a sign affixed to City Hall - and other inter-election capers and hijinks.
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SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | February 13, 2005
FOR AS LONG as sportsmen and women have been trying to gain an edge over critters, there have been companies peddling the next gimmick to give humans supremacy over members of the animal kingdom. As a member of Homo sapiens with a college degree who owns two rather large house cats with an agenda, I can only repeat the immortal words of Aerosmith: "Dream on." Yet, every season battery-powered gizmos and genetically jiggered bait flood the market. The latest must-have in our market is the "Black Salty," a live bait so powerful, we're told, that the whale would spit up Jonah to make room.
EXPLORE
May 29, 2012
An article in the May 28, 1937 edition of The Catonsville Herald and Baltimore Countian reported on the heroic effort by an area doctor to save the life of a little boy who had fallen into a backyard goldfish pond. Charles T. Cockey , two and one-half year old son of Mr. and Ms. Charles T. Cockey , was found unconscious in a shallow goldfish pool on the grounds of his home on Thursday afternoon of this week, and was revived by a physician after he apparently had ceased to breathe.
EXPLORE
May 29, 2012
An article in the May 28, 1937 edition of The Catonsville Herald and Baltimore Countian reported on the heroic effort by an area doctor to save the life of a little boy who had fallen into a backyard goldfish pond. Charles T. Cockey , two and one-half year old son of Mr. and Ms. Charles T. Cockey , was found unconscious in a shallow goldfish pool on the grounds of his home on Thursday afternoon of this week, and was revived by a physician after he apparently had ceased to breathe.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2004
Jacob Cherian waded into a pond in Sewells Orchard Park in Columbia this week searching for invaders. With help from Carl Spicher, another volunteer, he pulled a net through the shallow water Tuesday, hoping to corral some of the 50 large goldfish that have taken up residence in the pond. "They were huge," said Susan Muller, a natural resources technician with the Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks who spotted the fish this spring. She estimated they were 18 inches to 24 inches long.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2003
Biologists from the state Department of Natural Resources offered a way yesterday to deal with an invasion of unwanted goldfish in a Columbia pond: bring in bigger fish. Three fisheries experts with a large net waded into the pond on Montgomery Run Road at the request of the county Department of Recreation and Parks, surveyed the aquatic life and suggested largemouth bass to take care of hundreds of non-native goldfish and several large koi that are disturbing the ecosystem of the pond.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2003
Biologists from the state Department of Natural Resources offered a way yesterday to deal with an invasion of unwanted goldfish in a Columbia pond: bring in bigger fish. Three fisheries experts with a large net waded into the pond on Montgomery Run Road at the request of the county Department of Recreation and Parks, surveyed the aquatic life and suggested largemouth bass to take care of hundreds of non-native goldfish and several large koi that are disturbing the ecosystem of the pond.
NEWS
By June Kurtz and June Kurtz,Contributing writer | July 17, 1991
For $1, a fair-goer received 10 chances to win a goldfish -- all thecontestant had to do was toss a pingpong ball into a pint-size fishbowl.The game was besieged by people, young and old, all trying toleave the Sykesville Fireman's Park with more than a stuffed animal and stuffed belly.About 100 were successful each night, said a game operator, who refused to give his name."The kids enjoy it," the man said, as he gathered balls for the next eager competitor. "People tell us about the fish that they have from years before -- and they're getting bigger."
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Evening Sun Staff | August 16, 1991
City Council candidate Donna Joy Beth Shapiro was only "fishing for votes," but she touched off a controversy when she sent 50 goldfish to local media organizations, including several TV stations and The Evening Sun.The goldfish were enclosed in small plastic bags filled with water. A piece of Shapiro's campaign literature, with the line, "I'm TC fishing for your vote," was stapled to the top of each bag.Shapiro is one of 13 Democrats seeking the three 2nd District council seats in the Sept.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2011
I've really enjoyed the goldfish in my garden pond and would like to keep them over the winter. Other than a heater, what else should I do? Someone said not to feed fish in the winter. Is this correct? Stop feeding goldfish when the water temperature drops below 55 degrees F. This usually occurs in mid- to late November. It's a good idea to install a floating stock tank heater to keep a small portion of the pond free of ice; not for keeping the fish warm — rather to expose the water to air, thus oxygenating the water.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | June 4, 2006
The guy who supervises the crime lab for Baltimore City police is a crime novelist in his spare time. The department also has an officer who was assigned to the Western District around the time JFK took office - and is still there. Where can somebody see stories like these, the upbeat, human-interest side of Baltimore's finest? Newspapers? TV news? Fat chance, says department spokesman Matt Jablow. With the media more interested in street-crime gore and police scandals, the department has decided to take its good news straight to the people - producing its own video features and posting them on www.baltimorepolice.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | February 13, 2005
FOR AS LONG as sportsmen and women have been trying to gain an edge over critters, there have been companies peddling the next gimmick to give humans supremacy over members of the animal kingdom. As a member of Homo sapiens with a college degree who owns two rather large house cats with an agenda, I can only repeat the immortal words of Aerosmith: "Dream on." Yet, every season battery-powered gizmos and genetically jiggered bait flood the market. The latest must-have in our market is the "Black Salty," a live bait so powerful, we're told, that the whale would spit up Jonah to make room.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2004
Jacob Cherian waded into a pond in Sewells Orchard Park in Columbia this week searching for invaders. With help from Carl Spicher, another volunteer, he pulled a net through the shallow water Tuesday, hoping to corral some of the 50 large goldfish that have taken up residence in the pond. "They were huge," said Susan Muller, a natural resources technician with the Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks who spotted the fish this spring. She estimated they were 18 inches to 24 inches long.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2004
At 10 a.m. on a rainy Monday, with his three rabbits in the garage fed and his mother's cereal bowl empty, Peter Severance is ready to begin his school day. He lies on his stomach on the beige living room carpet and throws the cat a toy. His mother, Ann, sits on the navy flowered couch and begins reading aloud from Arthur Ransome's Pigeon Post, Chapter 27. This is Peter's classroom, a two-story tan house at Baltimore's western edge, steps away from...
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2003
Biologists from the state Department of Natural Resources offered a way yesterday to deal with an invasion of unwanted goldfish in a Columbia pond: bring in bigger fish. Three fisheries experts with a large net waded into the pond on Montgomery Run Road at the request of the county Department of Recreation and Parks, surveyed the aquatic life and suggested largemouth bass to take care of hundreds of non-native goldfish and several large koi that are disturbing the ecosystem of the pond.
NEWS
March 15, 1994
WE'LL be pilloried for this by the animal rightists, but after all the trouble with the student newspaper at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, there was comfort last week in a front-page Retriever story about a fraternity party at which live goldfish allegedly were devoured.We say "allegedly" because no one seems to have actually witnessed the swallowing of a fish. But carrying signs reading "Save the Fish" and "Stop Senseless Death," a small group of animal-rights protesters did attend the March 3 Alpha Tau Omega affair.
NEWS
By MICHELLE TRAGESER | June 7, 2000
WHEN SPRING arrives and the flowers are blooming and the birds singing, I know that carnival time cannot be far behind. In our house, that means only one thing. We will soon be the owners of goldfish. There are few things in life that can be counted upon. One of them is that, each spring, my two boys will come home from the school fair at Roland Park Elementary School in North Baltimore with small plastic bags full of water and tiny fish. Apparently it doesn't matter how good one's aim is in throwing Ping-Pong balls at plastic buckets.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2003
Biologists from the state Department of Natural Resources offered a way yesterday to deal with an invasion of unwanted goldfish in a Columbia pond: bring in bigger fish. Three fisheries experts with a large net waded into the pond on Montgomery Run Road at the request of the county Department of Recreation and Parks, surveyed the aquatic life and suggested largemouth bass to take care of hundreds of non-native goldfish and several large koi that are disturbing the ecosystem of the pond.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2003
Biologists from the state Department of Natural Resources offered a way yesterday to deal with an invasion of unwanted goldfish in a Columbia pond: bring in bigger fish. Three fisheries experts with a large net waded into the pond on Montgomery Run Road at the request of the county Department of Recreation and Parks, surveyed the aquatic life and suggested largemouth bass to take care of hundreds of non-native goldfish and several large koi that are disturbing the ecosystem of the pond.
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