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Golden Years

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By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
Before the recession, Madie Green's home daycare was normally full. As parents lost their jobs and pulled kids out, the 55-year-old District Heights woman spent through her savings to keep up on her mortgage and auto payments. Her business still hasn't recovered to what it once was, and now she's so worried about whether she'll be able to retire that she is expanding into an after-school program for elementary and middle school students. Retirement seems more distant than ever.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
Before the recession, Madie Green's home daycare was normally full. As parents lost their jobs and pulled kids out, the 55-year-old District Heights woman spent through her savings to keep up on her mortgage and auto payments. Her business still hasn't recovered to what it once was, and now she's so worried about whether she'll be able to retire that she is expanding into an after-school program for elementary and middle school students. Retirement seems more distant than ever.
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 16, 1991
It's playful and paranoid. It's tender. It's simplistic and it's profound. It's Stephen King. And, like Carrie's hand reaching up out of the grave, if you give King's "Golden Years" a moment or two, it's going to get you."Golden Years," which airs at 9 tonight on WBAL-TV (Channel 11), is network television's latest attempt at quirky. After tonight's two-hour premiere, the six-part series will air Thursday nights at 10.The story is about a 70-year-old custodian, Harlan Williams (Keith Szarabajka)
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2010
Maryland is the fifth-worst state to retire, at least according to a recent ranking that accounted for climate, crime, life expectancy, taxes and the cost of living. The only states worse than here are, in order: Nevada, Michigan, Alaska and South Carolina, according to MoneyRates.com, a financial site. Best places to spend your golden years? New Hampshire is No. 1, followed by Hawaii, South and North Dakota, Iowa, Virginia, Utah, Connecticut, Vermont and Idaho. But the retirement equation is often more complex than a ranking based on raw data.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | July 16, 1991
IN SCENE One of "Golden Years" -- oops, make that "Stephen King's Golden Years" -- an actor obviously made up to look much older than he is comes to work as a janitor at some sort of agricultural research facility that has the security of a nuclear silo.Though he is clearly a bright, alert fellow, there is much talk of his advanced age -- nearly 71. And, a few scenes down the line, he is even forced into retirement by a bad guy military boss citing a close failure on an eye exam, as if eagle eyesight is important for the clean-up crew.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | August 8, 1991
On The Weekend Watch:NOW YOU SEE HIM . . . -- Going back to at least Alfred Hitchcock, it has been a seemingly irresistible impulse for behind-the-camera creators to pop up in cameo appearances on screen. So it's no surprise that Stephen King can be seen -- and heard -- briefly in tonight's scheduled edition of "Golden Years," his first writing creation targeted specifically for TV. He's a bus driver in his own script for this episode of the limited series, at 10 p.m. on CBS/Channel 11.DID YOU KNOW THAT.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Evening Sun Staff | December 17, 1991
She is 75. He is 77. They have lived in the same house on McHenry Street in southwest Baltimore since 1942.But they will not allow their address to be printed in the newspaper. They will not allow their names to be used.They say that if they were quoted by name in this story about elderly people's fear of crime, they might become victims themselves. A neighborhood drug dealer, or the prostitute who solicits customers from their front steps, might take offense at their comments and torch their house.
NEWS
By Mike Nortrup and Mike Nortrup,Contributing writer | October 27, 1991
You'd never know Andrew Mason is retired.The 70-year-old South Carroll resident left the state Department of Education last year after a 40-year career as a teacher, principal and administrator. Yet he remains on the go.A man whose life story is far from complete, this amiable gentleman continues to add lively chapters.He immerses himself in a range of volunteer activities that must seem at times to surpass the demands of a full-time job."I'm staying very busy and that's good," Mason said.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2010
Maryland is the fifth-worst state to retire, at least according to a recent ranking that accounted for climate, crime, life expectancy, taxes and the cost of living. The only states worse than here are, in order: Nevada, Michigan, Alaska and South Carolina, according to MoneyRates.com, a financial site. Best places to spend your golden years? New Hampshire is No. 1, followed by Hawaii, South and North Dakota, Iowa, Virginia, Utah, Connecticut, Vermont and Idaho. But the retirement equation is often more complex than a ranking based on raw data.
NEWS
December 2, 1990
Every Thursday, the Anne Arundel County Sun publishes a section highlighting the lives and activities of our senior citizens. We've told you about weightlifters and karate practitioners, world travelers and local Good Samaritans. Their stories reinforce the promise of "the golden years" when we retire.But there's another side to growing older, the tarnished side to the golden years. It's there you find the elderly who aren't healthy enough or wealthy enough to enjoy the promise. They're closed off from the rest of the world, living in nursing homes, closeted in tiny apartments and drafty trailers, sometimes praying that death will free them from facing another day.Medical advances have stretched life expectancy; many parents live to see their children's children graduate from college and begin a life on their own.But the retirement cushions they've come to depend on -- pensions, Social Security and medical assistance programs -- haven't kept pace with technology.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2010
Margaret W. Fowler, a World War II nurse who later edited a pair of literary anthologies, died Wednesday of Parkinson's disease at the Broadmead retirement community. She was 87. Margaret Williamson, whose father owned Veneers LLC in Cockeysville and whose mother was an educator, was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson. She was a 1940 graduate of Bryn Mawr School and earned a bachelor's degree in English literature in 1945 from Wellesley College. Mrs. Fowler served as a Red Cross nurse in the Philippines and Japan near the end of World War II. While serving in Japan, she met Army Lt. James Randlett Fowler.
NEWS
February 14, 2010
It will take me 15 years to make $1 million, figuring I could bank my entire salary. I make more than the average American family, which isn't anywhere close to the 2 percent that earn over $250,000. So I ask Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele, to whom were you referring Thursday, when you said "a million dollars is not a lot of money"? Perhaps your greedy buddies on Wall Street? Or the fat cats you supported for tax cuts while opposing the Recovery Act, that has saved or created millions of jobs?
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 19, 2009
Five days of work on the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope should end Tuesday morning with the release of what one astronomer said is "in many ways ... a brand new telescope." "At this point, Hubble actually has the largest complement of functioning instruments it has ever had" since its launch in 1990, said Mario Livio, senior scientist at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore. "This is going to be an observatory that is just so much more powerful and more promising." The crew of the shuttle Atlantis was to release the telescope just before 9 a.m. Tuesday.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | July 17, 2008
Lately, there has been a great deal of buzz about taking steps to keep our brains young and alert. Indeed, it may behoove us to pay attention: There are things most people can do to help keep their brains healthy, says Dr. Majid Fotuhi, director for the Center of Memory and Brain Health at the LifeBridge Health Brain & Spine Institute. Fotuhi also is the author of The Memory Cure: How to Protect Your Brain Against Memory Loss and Alzheimer's. Are there really things that we all can do to try to keep our brains young?
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,Special to The Sun | February 24, 2008
Vicki and Tom Goodman were thinking ahead when they decided to remodel their Catonsville cottage. They knew their 11-year-old son, Riley, would need more space and privacy as he entered his teen years, so just having two bedrooms on the upper level was not going to suffice. But they started thinking really long term after consulting with a contractor who also happened to be an "aging in place" specialist. Although they have no mobility issues now, they decided against their original idea of expanding the second floor and instead decided that remodeling the first floor would be wiser.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | January 23, 2008
Richard Lunsford feels as if he's watching the economy fall apart, and along with it, his plans for retirement. The stock market is volatile. Inflation is rising. Health care is expensive. And housing sales are weak - a pointedly painful fact for Lunsford, 55, who runs a construction business from his Pasadena home. "Right now, there's hardly any work at all. No one's buying houses, no one's repairing houses, no one's building," he said. "I probably won't get to retire. I'm living on my savings right now."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 26, 1998
LOS ANGELES -- Former President Jimmy Carter remembers clearly when reality struck, when he knew he had reached senior citizen-dom, a state he had until then rejected as only for older folks.He and his wife, Rosalynn, and friends had ordered identical breakfasts at a cafe in Georgia, but when the bills came, Carter's was less. An honest man, Carter "called the waitress over and said, 'You made a mistake,' " he recalls. " 'You didn't charge me enough.' "Whereupon, a farmer of a certain age sitting at the next table said: "That ain't no mistake, Mr. President.
NEWS
February 14, 2010
It will take me 15 years to make $1 million, figuring I could bank my entire salary. I make more than the average American family, which isn't anywhere close to the 2 percent that earn over $250,000. So I ask Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele, to whom were you referring Thursday, when you said "a million dollars is not a lot of money"? Perhaps your greedy buddies on Wall Street? Or the fat cats you supported for tax cuts while opposing the Recovery Act, that has saved or created millions of jobs?
NEWS
By M. Cindy Hounsell | September 7, 2006
We hear a lot lately about the retirement insecurity of American workers generally, but less about the fact that women are especially at risk. The demographics point to why we should care: By the time Americans reach age 85, nearly three-fourths (71 percent) are women. This segment of the population is expected to double, and possibly triple, over the next three decades. The result: Women will need more services from communities that are already overburdened and the target of cutbacks. Why?
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart | July 10, 2005
At the height of the 1999 stock market frenzy, when betting on initial offerings of Internet companies with no profits seemed a sure thing, plenty of people still put their money on another roll of the dice. A survey by the Consumer Federation of America found that 27 percent of respondents said their best chance of accumulating a half-million dollars or more during their lifetimes was a lottery or sweepstakes win. Fast forward to 2005, when market expectations are far humbler. The worldwide gaming industry has soared: Two-thirds of adult Americans in a Gallup poll this year said they had gambled in the previous 12 months, and U.S. lottery players spent $49 billion in 2004.
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