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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | February 21, 1992
"Beauty and the Beast" made motion picture history Wednesday when it became the first animated feature ever nominated for a best-picture Academy Award. That's the beauty of it. The beastly side is the recent death of one of the men most responsible for the movie's success. Howard Ashman, the film's Baltimore-born executive producer and lyricist, died of AIDS last March at age 40.Yesterday his mother and sister spoke of the mixture of pride and sadness with which they received the news of the Oscar nominations, which include three for original songs and two others for score and sound.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 13, 2012
Overall, the Golden Globe nominations proved kind to made-in-Baltimore productions. HBO's political drama "Game Change" -- the story of former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin's 2008 vice-presidential run -- earned the most TV nominations with five: best TV movie or mini-series; best actress in a TV movie or mini-series (Julianne Moore); best actor in a TV movie or mini-series (Woody Harrelson); best supporting actress in a TV movie, series or mini-series (Sarah Paulson); and best supporting actor in a TV movie, series or mini-series (Ed Harris)
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By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1997
The Academy Awards. Who needs 'em?I mean, do we really need them to tell us who the best movie actor was last year? Do we need their stamp of approval before figuring out filmdom's best director or its best cinematographer or its best costume designer? For God's sake, in the year 1997 do we really have to turn to some know-it-alls in L.A. to clue us in on what was the best movie in 1996?Of course we don't.Not when we have the Golden Globe Awards and the Screen Actors Guild Awards and the National Board of Review Awards and the Independent Spirit Awards and the People's Choice Awards.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 18, 2010
With her best-supporting actress win at last night's Golden Globe Awards, Mo'Nique has emerged as the solid favorite to win the Oscar. And her tearful and heartfelt acceptance speech dispelled any notion that the Baltimore County-born actress didn't much care for Hollywood awards. Mo'Nique earned the Golden Globe for playing Mary Jones, a monstrous, abusive welfare mother with a disarming moment of clarity in the movie "Precious: Based on the Novel Push by Sapphire." Clearly moved, Mo'Nique, who until the movie was released in November was known more for her stand-up comedy and BET talk show than for her acting chops, received a prolonged ovation from an audience composed largely of her acting peers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 13, 2012
Overall, the Golden Globe nominations proved kind to made-in-Baltimore productions. HBO's political drama "Game Change" -- the story of former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin's 2008 vice-presidential run -- earned the most TV nominations with five: best TV movie or mini-series; best actress in a TV movie or mini-series (Julianne Moore); best actor in a TV movie or mini-series (Woody Harrelson); best supporting actress in a TV movie, series or mini-series (Sarah Paulson); and best supporting actor in a TV movie, series or mini-series (Ed Harris)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik david.zurawik@baltsun.com | January 17, 2010
T here are more reasons to watch the Golden Globe Awards show tonight than at any time in its history. The biggest one is that for the first time the live telecast will have a host, and he's an unpredictable one who could create some genuine, unrehearsed fun: Ricky Gervais. The Hollywood Foreign Press Association has also given more control to Dick Clark Productions with the mandate to create a television event worthy of prime time - rather than an awards dinner geared to a hotel ballroom in Beverly Hills filled with celebrities.
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By DAVID ZURAWIK | January 17, 2010
There are more reasons to watch the Golden Globe Awards show tonight than at any time in its history. The biggest one is that for the first time the live telecast will have a host, and he's an unpredictable one who could create some genuine, unrehearsed fun: Ricky Gervais. The Hollywood Foreign Press Association has also given more control to Dick Clark Productions with the mandate to create a television event worthy of prime time - rather than an awards dinner geared to a hotel ballroom in Beverly Hills filled with celebrities.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 18, 2010
With her best-supporting actress win at last night's Golden Globe Awards, Mo'Nique has emerged as the solid favorite to win the Oscar. And her tearful and heartfelt acceptance speech dispelled any notion that the Baltimore County-born actress didn't much care for Hollywood awards. Mo'Nique earned the Golden Globe for playing Mary Jones, a monstrous, abusive welfare mother with a disarming moment of clarity in the movie "Precious: Based on the Novel Push by Sapphire." Clearly moved, Mo'Nique, who until the movie was released in November was known more for her stand-up comedy and BET talk show than for her acting chops, received a prolonged ovation from an audience composed largely of her acting peers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 17, 2010
With her best-supporting actress win at last night's Golden Globe Awards, Mo'Nique has emerged as the solid favorite to win the Oscar. And her tearful and heartfelt acceptance speech dispelled any notion that the Baltimore County-born actress didn't much care for Hollywood awards. Mo'Nique earned the Golden Globe for playing Mary Jones, a monstrous, abusive welfare mother with a disarming moment of clarity in the movie "Precious: Based on the Novel Push by Sapphire." A moved Mo'Nique, who until the movie was released in November was known more for her stand-up comedy and BET talk show than for her acting chops, received a prolonged ovation from an audience composed largely of her acting peers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | January 18, 2010
With her best-supporting actress win at last night's Golden Globe Awards, Mo'Nique has emerged as the solid favorite to win the Oscar. And her tearful and heartfelt acceptance speech dispelled any notion that the Baltimore County-born actress didn't much care for Hollywood awards. Mo'Nique earned the Golden Globe for playing Mary Jones, a monstrous, abusive welfare mother with a disarming moment of clarity in the movie "Precious: Based on the Novel Push by Sapphire." Clearly moved, Mo'Nique, who until the movie was released in November was known more for her stand-up comedy and BET talk show than for her acting chops, received a prolonged ovation from an audience composed largely of her acting peers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | January 18, 2010
With her best-supporting actress win at last night's Golden Globe Awards, Mo'Nique has emerged as the solid favorite to win the Oscar. And her tearful and heartfelt acceptance speech dispelled any notion that the Baltimore County-born actress didn't much care for Hollywood awards. Mo'Nique earned the Golden Globe for playing Mary Jones, a monstrous, abusive welfare mother with a disarming moment of clarity in the movie "Precious: Based on the Novel Push by Sapphire." Clearly moved, Mo'Nique, who until the movie was released in November was known more for her stand-up comedy and BET talk show than for her acting chops, received a prolonged ovation from an audience composed largely of her acting peers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik david.zurawik@baltsun.com | January 17, 2010
T here are more reasons to watch the Golden Globe Awards show tonight than at any time in its history. The biggest one is that for the first time the live telecast will have a host, and he's an unpredictable one who could create some genuine, unrehearsed fun: Ricky Gervais. The Hollywood Foreign Press Association has also given more control to Dick Clark Productions with the mandate to create a television event worthy of prime time - rather than an awards dinner geared to a hotel ballroom in Beverly Hills filled with celebrities.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 17, 2010
With her best-supporting actress win at last night's Golden Globe Awards, Mo'Nique has emerged as the solid favorite to win the Oscar. And her tearful and heartfelt acceptance speech dispelled any notion that the Baltimore County-born actress didn't much care for Hollywood awards. Mo'Nique earned the Golden Globe for playing Mary Jones, a monstrous, abusive welfare mother with a disarming moment of clarity in the movie "Precious: Based on the Novel Push by Sapphire." A moved Mo'Nique, who until the movie was released in November was known more for her stand-up comedy and BET talk show than for her acting chops, received a prolonged ovation from an audience composed largely of her acting peers.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK | January 17, 2010
There are more reasons to watch the Golden Globe Awards show tonight than at any time in its history. The biggest one is that for the first time the live telecast will have a host, and he's an unpredictable one who could create some genuine, unrehearsed fun: Ricky Gervais. The Hollywood Foreign Press Association has also given more control to Dick Clark Productions with the mandate to create a television event worthy of prime time - rather than an awards dinner geared to a hotel ballroom in Beverly Hills filled with celebrities.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1997
The Academy Awards. Who needs 'em?I mean, do we really need them to tell us who the best movie actor was last year? Do we need their stamp of approval before figuring out filmdom's best director or its best cinematographer or its best costume designer? For God's sake, in the year 1997 do we really have to turn to some know-it-alls in L.A. to clue us in on what was the best movie in 1996?Of course we don't.Not when we have the Golden Globe Awards and the Screen Actors Guild Awards and the National Board of Review Awards and the Independent Spirit Awards and the People's Choice Awards.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | January 25, 1993
If anybody knows awards shows, Dick Clark does.Clark, after all, has spent years helping to make trophy-giving an industry in itself. Since creating the American Music Awards two decades ago, he has churned out a dizzying array of similarly star-studded bashes, including shows devoted to the Golden Globe Awards, the Daytime Emmy Awards and the Academy of Country Music Awards. All told, he has probably contributed more to the tuxedo-rental business than any man in Hollywood.Even so, Clark's view of these shows isn't quite what the average viewer might expect.
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | January 25, 1993
If anybody knows awards shows, Dick Clark does.Clark, after all, has spent years helping to make trophy-giving an industry in itself. Since creating the American Music Awards two decades ago, he has churned out a dizzying array of similarly star-studded bashes, including shows devoted to the Golden Globe Awards, the Daytime Emmy Awards and the Academy of Country Music Awards. All told, he has probably contributed more to the tuxedo-rental business than any man in Hollywood.Even so, Clark's view of these shows isn't quite what the average viewer might expect.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Reporter | January 15, 2007
When the red carpet rolls out tonight for the 64th annual Golden Globe Awards, millions of star-gazers will be tuned in. But it's a fair guess that many of them won't be nearly as interested in whether Babel or Bobby takes the top honors as they will be in what's hugging Beyonce's curves. Or whether Meryl Streep will indeed wear Prada. On TV The 64th Annual Golden Globe Awards will air live tonight on NBC (Channel 11) from 8 to 11.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | February 21, 1992
"Beauty and the Beast" made motion picture history Wednesday when it became the first animated feature ever nominated for a best-picture Academy Award. That's the beauty of it. The beastly side is the recent death of one of the men most responsible for the movie's success. Howard Ashman, the film's Baltimore-born executive producer and lyricist, died of AIDS last March at age 40.Yesterday his mother and sister spoke of the mixture of pride and sadness with which they received the news of the Oscar nominations, which include three for original songs and two others for score and sound.
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