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By Jane Meredith Adams and Jane Meredith Adams,Special to The Sun The New York Times also contributed to this story | July 12, 1995
San Francisco -- Michael Guss took his leap from the Golden Gate Bridge on a windy, clear January day in 1990. Ditching his bottle of lithium on the bridge's walkway, he climbed up the 3 1/2 -foot railing, balanced for a moment, then fell backward.The 220-feet plunge took about four seconds. He hit the water with a force that has been likened to crashing into concrete."I pretty much passed out on the way down," says Mr. Guss, 31, a former Wall Street options trader who is now an aspiring television situation-comedy writer in Taos, N.M. "When I came up I had lost my glasses, so I had not great vision in addition to internal confusion.
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By Louise Vest | December 4, 2011
100 Years Ago Rolling out the welcome mat In the Times social column: "Mr. Henry J. Bender has returned to his home on Rolling Road after visiting friends in New York City. Mr. and Mrs. C. N. Davis have returned to their home on Rolling Road after spending several days with friends in Baltimore. " Mr. Bender and the Davises lived on Rolling Road before its hills, vales and curves were straightened out. The road lived up to its name then and traveling it you could easily imagine those hogsheads of tobacco bumping and rolling down it toward the deep, wide, 18th-century Patapsco River where they were loaded onto ships.
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TRAVEL
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun Reporter | July 22, 2007
EMBARRASSING CONFESSION from a wannabe "foodie": Until a recent trip to San Francisco, I thought Michelin only made tires. "All of the places we're going to in Napa have Michelin stars," my sister, Andrea, boasted minutes after my boyfriend and I arrived at her North Beach apartment for a week-long family vacation. "Not the same company that makes the tires?" I asked. My continent-hopping sister looked at me -- the sibling who actually uses her stove and who subscribes to zagat.com and Food and Wine magazine -- as if I had spent my post-college years in a black hole.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,sun reporter | May 26, 2008
Alison Zhao is not what you'd call an expert cyclist or even a biking enthusiast. Until March, in fact, the 20-year-old college student hadn't been on a bicycle since middle school. But with a few months of training ("What is it called? Spinning?" she responded when asked about her preparations) Zhao joined a group of 25 students yesterday who began pedaling 4,000 miles across the country to raise money for cancer treatment and raise awareness about the disease. "It was kind of spontaneous.
TRAVEL
December 10, 2006
We crossed the Golden Gate Bridge in heavy fog and stopped at the overlook for a view of the city. As the September morning fog lifted, I snapped the picture looking back toward San Francisco. Our disappointment when crossing was quickly gone once the scene unfolded. Wayne R. Harman Towson
NEWS
April 29, 2000
Vic Condiotty, 78, a master at recognizing great photographic opportunities, imagining others and making them happen in 41 years with the Seattle Times, died Monday in Seattle after a stroke. He was 78. Mr. Condiotty won numerous awards for an unposed picture that showed a blind woman kneeling at the curb over the body of her guide dog, which had just been killed by a motor vehicle, while a police officer stood over her. Al Zampa, 95, a man who survived a fall off the Golden Gate Bridge and worked on Northern California's most famous bridges, died Sunday in San Pablo, Calif.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Sun Staff Writer | January 15, 1995
The world may be round, not flat, but Flat Stanley is exactly that.Being flat was no handicap, though, because around the world Stanley did go.Of course, he had a little help from the families and friends of Davidsonville Elementary School third-graders and the U.S. Postal Service.Inspired by the story of "Flat Stanley," which recounts the exploits of a young boy who gets flattened by a bulletin board, Barbara Gross' students made their own Flat Stanley paper dolls.They then wrote to friends and relatives in Brazil, California and other places.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 26, 2007
SAN FRANCISCO -- There are no naming rights on the table, and there will not be any logo-bearing neon signs, tower-to-tower banners or screaming billboards, either. That might ruin the view. But on Friday, a committee of the board that runs the financially strapped Golden Gate Bridge did pass along a plan for a so-called corporate partnership for the structure, sending a proposal to a vote before the full board next month. Even as it did so, activists here were preparing for the possibility that the Golden Gate - the engineering wonder, international tourist attraction and perpetual suicide magnet - might soon be brought to you by Coca-Cola, for example.
NEWS
By John M. Glionna and John M. Glionna,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 5, 2005
SAN FRANCISCO -- The very moment John Kevin Hines jumped off the Golden Gate Bridge, he knew he had made a mistake. His eyes wet with tears, he had finally consented to the voices that commanded him to take his own life. But at 10:40 a.m. on that overcast September day, just as he catapulted over a 4-foot-high railing and began his frantic free-fall, the college freshman asked himself: "What did I just do? I don't want to die." Plummeting head-first toward the churning waters 220 feet below, he tried to scream, but the force of the descent sucked the air from his lungs.
NEWS
By Gwinn Owens | March 18, 1991
MEMORIES may fade, but the matrix of emotions on which they are inscribed does not. That's why, watching television, I cried. The scene was a military base where the soldiers and sailors of the gulf war were joyfully, tearfully reunited with their families.My own emotional surge caught me completely by surprise. Up to that point my sincere appreciation of our men and women in the gulf was tempered by the fact of the relative ease and speed with which their mission was accomplished. Now here I was, embarrassed by the tears evoked in this televised homecoming.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 26, 2007
SAN FRANCISCO -- There are no naming rights on the table, and there will not be any logo-bearing neon signs, tower-to-tower banners or screaming billboards, either. That might ruin the view. But on Friday, a committee of the board that runs the financially strapped Golden Gate Bridge did pass along a plan for a so-called corporate partnership for the structure, sending a proposal to a vote before the full board next month. Even as it did so, activists here were preparing for the possibility that the Golden Gate - the engineering wonder, international tourist attraction and perpetual suicide magnet - might soon be brought to you by Coca-Cola, for example.
TRAVEL
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun Reporter | July 22, 2007
EMBARRASSING CONFESSION from a wannabe "foodie": Until a recent trip to San Francisco, I thought Michelin only made tires. "All of the places we're going to in Napa have Michelin stars," my sister, Andrea, boasted minutes after my boyfriend and I arrived at her North Beach apartment for a week-long family vacation. "Not the same company that makes the tires?" I asked. My continent-hopping sister looked at me -- the sibling who actually uses her stove and who subscribes to zagat.com and Food and Wine magazine -- as if I had spent my post-college years in a black hole.
TRAVEL
December 10, 2006
We crossed the Golden Gate Bridge in heavy fog and stopped at the overlook for a view of the city. As the September morning fog lifted, I snapped the picture looking back toward San Francisco. Our disappointment when crossing was quickly gone once the scene unfolded. Wayne R. Harman Towson
NEWS
By John M. Glionna and John M. Glionna,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 5, 2005
SAN FRANCISCO -- The very moment John Kevin Hines jumped off the Golden Gate Bridge, he knew he had made a mistake. His eyes wet with tears, he had finally consented to the voices that commanded him to take his own life. But at 10:40 a.m. on that overcast September day, just as he catapulted over a 4-foot-high railing and began his frantic free-fall, the college freshman asked himself: "What did I just do? I don't want to die." Plummeting head-first toward the churning waters 220 feet below, he tried to scream, but the force of the descent sucked the air from his lungs.
FEATURES
By Mark Reutter and Mark Reutter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 1, 2003
When the journalist John Gunther asked an expert "What is steel?" back in 1947, the answer he got was "America." Four out of five manufactured items contained steel, and 40 percent of all industrial wage earners owed their livelihood directly or indirectly to the industry. Steel was everywhere, from the 70-story towers of the Golden Gate Bridge to the steel wool that post-war housewives used to clean pots and pans. Bethlehem Steel, The People Who Built America, which is airing tonight on MPT, is a paean to the lost world of steelmaking.
FEATURES
February 10, 2003
Lucas sets up shop with special effects campus Star Wars creator George Lucas hopes a $300 million special effects campus for his film company will help San Francisco rival Hollywood as a producer of movie magic. "San Francisco's always had a quality of filmmaking that most people haven't been able to recognize, we always get shoved under the title `Hollywood,'" Lucas said Saturday at the project's groundbreaking. The campus, for the digital arts project of Lucasfilm Ltd., will be near the Golden Gate Bridge at the Presidio.
NEWS
By FREDERICK GOTTEMOELLER | September 19, 1991
Suppose you were making a commercial to convey the sense of aproduct reaching consumers from coast to coast. Which visual images would you choose?When United Airlines faced that problem a few years ago, it chose the Brooklyn Bridge to represent the East Coast, and the Golden Gate Bridge for the West Coast. That's not surprising. Bridges are among our most celebrated structures. Stretching across Tampa Bay or the Mississippi River, they can become symbols for entire regions.Our thousands of ''everyday'' bridges are important, too. The bridges on Chicago's Dan Ryan Expressway, for example, are seen by millions of commuters weekly.
FEATURES
February 10, 2003
Lucas sets up shop with special effects campus Star Wars creator George Lucas hopes a $300 million special effects campus for his film company will help San Francisco rival Hollywood as a producer of movie magic. "San Francisco's always had a quality of filmmaking that most people haven't been able to recognize, we always get shoved under the title `Hollywood,'" Lucas said Saturday at the project's groundbreaking. The campus, for the digital arts project of Lucasfilm Ltd., will be near the Golden Gate Bridge at the Presidio.
NEWS
April 29, 2000
Vic Condiotty, 78, a master at recognizing great photographic opportunities, imagining others and making them happen in 41 years with the Seattle Times, died Monday in Seattle after a stroke. He was 78. Mr. Condiotty won numerous awards for an unposed picture that showed a blind woman kneeling at the curb over the body of her guide dog, which had just been killed by a motor vehicle, while a police officer stood over her. Al Zampa, 95, a man who survived a fall off the Golden Gate Bridge and worked on Northern California's most famous bridges, died Sunday in San Pablo, Calif.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 25, 1996
SAN FRANCISCO -- In their perennial struggle to deter would-be jumpers, Golden Gate Bridge officials have decided to rely on the human touch rather than build new physical barriers.The bridge's Board of Directors voted Friday to institute an anti-suicide patrol so that the 1.6-mile span could be kept under surveillance throughout the daylight hours, when people usually leap.Toll collectors and maintenance and security personnel already stop about 75 percent of would-be jumpers, said Robert A. Warren, the bridge's manager, but there have been no designated suicide-preventers.
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