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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | January 31, 1992
It's as if the heavens opened to reveal a vision: a touring gospel musical of genuine quality and high theatrical style.The show is "Golden Gate," which is receiving its world premiere at the Lyric Opera House. And its quality is not so surprising when you discover it was conceived and staged by George W. Faison, Tony Award-winning choreographer of "The Wiz" and a former principal dancer with the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater.A musical revue celebrating gospel styles ranging from spirituals to jazz to present-day rap, "Golden Gate" doesn't have a traditional plot.
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NEWS
By Bill Shaikin, Tribune newspapers | November 2, 2010
ARLINGTON, Texas — The Giants landed on the shores of San Francisco 53 years ago, their colors worn by greats identified solely by their last name, Mays and Cepeda graced Seals Stadium. McCovey and Marichal christened Candlestick Park. Bonds lorded over AT&T Park. The statues and the records are theirs. The first World Series championship parade in San Francisco history will be led by a cast lovingly described by its manager as castoffs and misfits. Russ Hodges, rest in peace.
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | January 31, 1992
It's as if the heavens opened to reveal a vision: a touring gospel musical of genuine quality and high theatrical style.The show is "Golden Gate," which is receiving its world premiere at the Lyric Opera House. And its quality is not so surprising when you discover it was conceived and staged by George W. Faison, Tony Award-winning choreographer of "The Wiz" and a former principal dancer with the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater.A musical revue celebrating gospel styles ranging from spirituals to jazz to present-day rap, "Golden Gate" doesn't have a traditional plot.
TRAVEL
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun Reporter | July 22, 2007
EMBARRASSING CONFESSION from a wannabe "foodie": Until a recent trip to San Francisco, I thought Michelin only made tires. "All of the places we're going to in Napa have Michelin stars," my sister, Andrea, boasted minutes after my boyfriend and I arrived at her North Beach apartment for a week-long family vacation. "Not the same company that makes the tires?" I asked. My continent-hopping sister looked at me -- the sibling who actually uses her stove and who subscribes to zagat.com and Food and Wine magazine -- as if I had spent my post-college years in a black hole.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 8, 1993
SAN FRANCISCO -- Three months after the Golden Gate Bridge opened in May 1937, a war veteran named Harold B. Wobber climbed over its rust-red railing and plunged 220 feet to his death. Since then, a grim parade of tormented souls have followed him, giving the San Francisco landmark dubious fame as the No. 1 suicide shrine in the Western world.Most were killed instantly, but one who survived his four-second tumble called it "the only stylish way to go." Another described it as "certain death in a painless way," and "a romantic thing to do."
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano | January 27, 1992
If Jezebel were around today, she'd be performing in a disco. At least that's where director-choreographer George Faison has employed this Old Testament vixen in a gospel musical, "Golden Gate," receiving its premiere engagement at the Lyric Opera House tomorrow to Feb. 2.Best known for his Tony Award-winning choreography for "The Wiz" in 1975, Mr. Faison hopes this new show will encourage audiences to once again make the clear distinctions between right...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 25, 1996
SAN FRANCISCO -- In their perennial struggle to deter would-be jumpers, Golden Gate Bridge officials have decided to rely on the human touch rather than build new physical barriers.The bridge's Board of Directors voted Friday to institute an anti-suicide patrol so that the 1.6-mile span could be kept under surveillance throughout the daylight hours, when people usually leap.Toll collectors and maintenance and security personnel already stop about 75 percent of would-be jumpers, said Robert A. Warren, the bridge's manager, but there have been no designated suicide-preventers.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 2, 2001
California Gov. Gray Davis ordered National Guard soldiers posted on the state's four soaring suspension bridges, including San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge, after he said yesterday that authorities received "credible evidence" the bridges could be terrorist targets over the next several days. The tightened security around some of California's most famous landmarks gave a stark specificity to the repeated terrorist alerts issued across the country by federal and local officials in recent weeks, warnings that had unnerved many people precisely because of their vagueness.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | June 3, 2001
The e-mail came from a dedicated foodie who used to work at the Sun, raving about a banquet for 30 he had had at the Golden Gate Noodle House in Towson: "True," he wrote, "it was arranged by a Chinese-American friend of a friend, but most of the dishes, I'm told, are available either on the menu or by advance order." I had never been to the Golden Gate, so I didn't understand why he had said it was an unlikely place for a Chinese banquet. I saw when I got there. It's a tiny, cluttered mom-and-pop place on Allegheny Avenue with a few booths and tables decked out in red plastic cloths.
NEWS
April 18, 1995
The Chesapeake Bay Bridge had been opened only four months when, in September of 1952, a Baltimore engineer became the first to commit suicide there by jumping off the towering span.Although no exact figures are available, more than 75 people have followed his example in the last four decades -- including three men in the past two months. The recent rash of suicides has prompted the Maryland Transportation Authority, which oversees the bridge's operations, to consider whether anything can be done to prevent people from jumping to their deaths.
NEWS
By John M. Glionna and John M. Glionna,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 5, 2005
SAN FRANCISCO -- The very moment John Kevin Hines jumped off the Golden Gate Bridge, he knew he had made a mistake. His eyes wet with tears, he had finally consented to the voices that commanded him to take his own life. But at 10:40 a.m. on that overcast September day, just as he catapulted over a 4-foot-high railing and began his frantic free-fall, the college freshman asked himself: "What did I just do? I don't want to die." Plummeting head-first toward the churning waters 220 feet below, he tried to scream, but the force of the descent sucked the air from his lungs.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | October 14, 2002
SAN FRANCISCO - Kudos to the Halos. Those hot-hitting Angels made baseball history yesterday, 41 years and several ill-fated incarnations after they first came into this world. Born the Los Angeles Angels in 1961, they later became the California Angels to escape their stepchild status with the Dodgers. When that didn't work, they turned to this current designation: the Anaheim Angels. Or is that the Disney Angels? It doesn't matter. Mike Scioscia's hard-chargin' boys are no Mickey Mouse club, not the way they contracted the Minnesota Twins from the American League Championship Series yesterday.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 2, 2001
California Gov. Gray Davis ordered National Guard soldiers posted on the state's four soaring suspension bridges, including San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge, after he said yesterday that authorities received "credible evidence" the bridges could be terrorist targets over the next several days. The tightened security around some of California's most famous landmarks gave a stark specificity to the repeated terrorist alerts issued across the country by federal and local officials in recent weeks, warnings that had unnerved many people precisely because of their vagueness.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | June 3, 2001
The e-mail came from a dedicated foodie who used to work at the Sun, raving about a banquet for 30 he had had at the Golden Gate Noodle House in Towson: "True," he wrote, "it was arranged by a Chinese-American friend of a friend, but most of the dishes, I'm told, are available either on the menu or by advance order." I had never been to the Golden Gate, so I didn't understand why he had said it was an unlikely place for a Chinese banquet. I saw when I got there. It's a tiny, cluttered mom-and-pop place on Allegheny Avenue with a few booths and tables decked out in red plastic cloths.
NEWS
January 12, 1999
Orlandus Wilson, 81, whose bass voice was the foundation of the Golden Gate Quartet's gospel harmonies, died Dec. 30 in Paris, where he lived.The Golden Gate Quartet had a huge influence on American sacred and secular music. Performing in clubs and concert halls as well as churches, and backing up blues singers such as Leadbelly and Josh White, the quartet demonstrated that gospel had all the vitality of secular music. Its driving versions of spirituals were a model of vocal harmony for groups from the Dixie Hummingbirds to the Spaniels.
FEATURES
By David Gonzales and David Gonzales,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 13, 1997
Summer has arrived, and you're lusting for a long, lazy, meandering road trip. This yearning is endemic to our culture; its roots are snarled inexorably in our childhoods, when we learned that summer means a fully loaded family station wagon, long days spent over four humming wheels and new worlds explored at a leisurely, parentally mandated pace.Go. Submit to your road-lust. But this time, skip bland motels and crowded campgrounds for hostels. In any of North America's 250-plus hostels, you'll find laughably low prices, local ambience, the comforts of home, more information than you'll ever find in roadside visitor centers and fellow travelers as enamored of the open road as you are. Instead of staring at a TV or slapping mosquitoes in a sagging tent, you'll trade travel tips, recount adventures and banish, with new acquaintances, the ennui of the empty road.
NEWS
January 12, 1999
Orlandus Wilson, 81, whose bass voice was the foundation of the Golden Gate Quartet's gospel harmonies, died Dec. 30 in Paris, where he lived.The Golden Gate Quartet had a huge influence on American sacred and secular music. Performing in clubs and concert halls as well as churches, and backing up blues singers such as Leadbelly and Josh White, the quartet demonstrated that gospel had all the vitality of secular music. Its driving versions of spirituals were a model of vocal harmony for groups from the Dixie Hummingbirds to the Spaniels.
FEATURES
By Dan Ouellette and Dan Ouellette,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 17, 1997
SAN FRANCISCO -- Jon Miller is having a little trouble feeling at home.It's a cool, breezy Sunday at 3Com (nee Candlestick) Park. Miller has arrived at the home stadium of the San Francisco Giants for a quick, two-hour, get-acquainted tour before his first-ever broadcast here as the team's new radio and TV voice.It's not all new to him, of course. Miller cut his teeth on baseball here, coming from his boyhood home across San Francisco Bay to see Mays, McCovey and Marichal play. It's where he developed his love for the game, and for announcing.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 25, 1996
SAN FRANCISCO -- In their perennial struggle to deter would-be jumpers, Golden Gate Bridge officials have decided to rely on the human touch rather than build new physical barriers.The bridge's Board of Directors voted Friday to institute an anti-suicide patrol so that the 1.6-mile span could be kept under surveillance throughout the daylight hours, when people usually leap.Toll collectors and maintenance and security personnel already stop about 75 percent of would-be jumpers, said Robert A. Warren, the bridge's manager, but there have been no designated suicide-preventers.
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