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NEWS
By Rick Nichols and Rick Nichols,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | February 23, 1997
When Mickey D's grew up -- it was pushing 50 last year -- it put away childish things.Big mistake.The mighty Arch Deluxe, "the burger with the grown-up taste," didn't alter an embarrassing new reality for McDonald's -- the sales slump.Children had long driven the which-burger-stand-tonight decision.The Arch Deluxe, behind $200 million in promotion, was supposed to get baby boomers deciding for themselves -- and heading in droves toward the golden arches.But for the past six quarters, sales in U.S. stores have stayed unbudgingly flat -- or dropped.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Choi and Jennifer Choi,Sun reporter | May 15, 2008
The home of the Happy Meal never fails to give Vijai Nathan a feeling of security. It even helped lead her on a lifelong quest for identity and spiritual truths. In her one-woman autobiographical show, McGoddess: Big Macs, Karma & the American Dream, which opens Saturday at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, the comedian reveals how McDonald's, a Hindu mother, a born-again Christian sister, a semi-atheist father and her experience as a second-generation Indian-American made her question faith and influenced her self-perception.
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BUSINESS
By Beth Reinhard and Beth Reinhard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 5, 1997
Willis T. Smart likes to talk about dabbling in fiction writing, stand-up comedy and rock 'n' roll, but he is first and foremost a company man, from the Golden Arches pin on his lapel to the McDonald's soda he sips during a meeting.The tall, athletic redhead from Long Island, N.Y., made $1.55 an hour when he started serving Big Macs at 17. Now, the 42-year-old is one of 40 McDonald's senior regional managers in the country, relishing a new home on 3 acres in affluent Glenwood in western Howard County, a Lincoln Town Car, and membership in the Cattail Creek Country Club.
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | November 27, 2005
George Ritzer can still remember the first time. It was 1959. He was driving from his native New York, where he was a student at the City College of New York, to visit a friend at Amherst College. Looming next to the road somewhere in Massachusetts was a pair of golden arches, the first McDonald's restaurant he had seen. Little did Ritzer, now a University of Maryland professor, know that he was gazing on the symbol that would help establish his imprint on the field of sociology. The English version of his 1993 book The McDonaldization of Society, is a popular textbook that has sold more than 175,000 copies.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1996
Ending seven months of debate last night, the Annapolis city council voted, 7-1, to allow the opening of a McDonald's restaurant in the historic first block of West Street -- but without the golden arches.A store that has sat vacant for three years at 38 West St. will become a McDonald's express walk-up restaurant, with no bright red and yellow signs or drive-through windows.The council's approval -- with few amendments, and a lone dissenting vote by Alderman Louise Hammond, who represents the historic district -- was the last hurdle for the fast-food chain.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost | June 2, 1996
I'M NOT SURE when, exactly, my home town began to metamorphose into an exurb. Some might say it was the day McDonald's threw up the golden arches on Route 30. Or, perhaps, when developer Martin K. Hill bought a field just outside the Hampstead town limits. An old friend thinks the change began when the H.R. Lippy penny-candy shop went out of business.My own theory is that Hampstead the exurb was born the day somebody at the Carroll County Board of Education decided to shut down the old two-story brick elementary school on Main Street and build a new one on the outskirts.
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | November 27, 2005
George Ritzer can still remember the first time. It was 1959. He was driving from his native New York, where he was a student at the City College of New York, to visit a friend at Amherst College. Looming next to the road somewhere in Massachusetts was a pair of golden arches, the first McDonald's restaurant he had seen. Little did Ritzer, now a University of Maryland professor, know that he was gazing on the symbol that would help establish his imprint on the field of sociology. The English version of his 1993 book The McDonaldization of Society, is a popular textbook that has sold more than 175,000 copies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Choi and Jennifer Choi,Sun reporter | May 15, 2008
The home of the Happy Meal never fails to give Vijai Nathan a feeling of security. It even helped lead her on a lifelong quest for identity and spiritual truths. In her one-woman autobiographical show, McGoddess: Big Macs, Karma & the American Dream, which opens Saturday at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, the comedian reveals how McDonald's, a Hindu mother, a born-again Christian sister, a semi-atheist father and her experience as a second-generation Indian-American made her question faith and influenced her self-perception.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Staff Writer | September 19, 1993
The people of Hereford, a rural town in northern Baltimore County, aren't sure they're ready for the golden arches and the smell of frying hamburgers.Early next month, the local community association will vote on whether it wants a McDonald's.Company representatives, who have mentioned one location off Interstate 83 at Mount Carmel and York roads, came to town Tuesday night to gauge community support. They found the audience at the Hereford Community Association meeting hotly divided."A McDonald's would draw traffic off the interstate and through our community.
NEWS
By David Rocks and David Rocks,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 16, 1999
VIENNA, Austria -- The company that perfected the two-minute burger and fries is turning its attention to the four-hour cup of coffee.In Vienna, where dallying in coffeehouses is as central to the culture as waltzes or wieners, the last thing you might expect to see on your demitasse would be golden arches. But McDonald's is experimenting here with a concept called McCafe.Austrians apparently love McDonald's for its burgers; their country has more than 120 of the company's restaurants. For coffee, cake and conversation, however, the Viennese have long preferred the more leisurely pace of the city's hundreds of traditional cafes, where patrons such as Freud, Trotsky and Hitler all learned to nurse a cup while reading, writing or talking.
NEWS
By David Rocks and David Rocks,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 16, 1999
VIENNA, Austria -- The company that perfected the two-minute burger and fries is turning its attention to the four-hour cup of coffee.In Vienna, where dallying in coffeehouses is as central to the culture as waltzes or wieners, the last thing you might expect to see on your demitasse would be golden arches. But McDonald's is experimenting here with a concept called McCafe.Austrians apparently love McDonald's for its burgers; their country has more than 120 of the company's restaurants. For coffee, cake and conversation, however, the Viennese have long preferred the more leisurely pace of the city's hundreds of traditional cafes, where patrons such as Freud, Trotsky and Hitler all learned to nurse a cup while reading, writing or talking.
NEWS
By Rick Nichols and Rick Nichols,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | February 23, 1997
When Mickey D's grew up -- it was pushing 50 last year -- it put away childish things.Big mistake.The mighty Arch Deluxe, "the burger with the grown-up taste," didn't alter an embarrassing new reality for McDonald's -- the sales slump.Children had long driven the which-burger-stand-tonight decision.The Arch Deluxe, behind $200 million in promotion, was supposed to get baby boomers deciding for themselves -- and heading in droves toward the golden arches.But for the past six quarters, sales in U.S. stores have stayed unbudgingly flat -- or dropped.
BUSINESS
By Beth Reinhard and Beth Reinhard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 5, 1997
Willis T. Smart likes to talk about dabbling in fiction writing, stand-up comedy and rock 'n' roll, but he is first and foremost a company man, from the Golden Arches pin on his lapel to the McDonald's soda he sips during a meeting.The tall, athletic redhead from Long Island, N.Y., made $1.55 an hour when he started serving Big Macs at 17. Now, the 42-year-old is one of 40 McDonald's senior regional managers in the country, relishing a new home on 3 acres in affluent Glenwood in western Howard County, a Lincoln Town Car, and membership in the Cattail Creek Country Club.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1996
Ending seven months of debate last night, the Annapolis city council voted, 7-1, to allow the opening of a McDonald's restaurant in the historic first block of West Street -- but without the golden arches.A store that has sat vacant for three years at 38 West St. will become a McDonald's express walk-up restaurant, with no bright red and yellow signs or drive-through windows.The council's approval -- with few amendments, and a lone dissenting vote by Alderman Louise Hammond, who represents the historic district -- was the last hurdle for the fast-food chain.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1996
When McDonald's Corp. wanted to bring its famous burgers and fries to historic Annapolis five months ago, area business owners and residents objected loudly and vowed to fight the proposal every step of the way.But those voices of protest were curiously absent last night as McDonald's made its pitch to the City Council, presenting its application to open an express restaurant in the historic first block of West St."There is no use protesting any more," said Tony Cipriano, as he closed his restaurant, Tony's Pizza-n-Pasta, for the night.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost | June 2, 1996
I'M NOT SURE when, exactly, my home town began to metamorphose into an exurb. Some might say it was the day McDonald's threw up the golden arches on Route 30. Or, perhaps, when developer Martin K. Hill bought a field just outside the Hampstead town limits. An old friend thinks the change began when the H.R. Lippy penny-candy shop went out of business.My own theory is that Hampstead the exurb was born the day somebody at the Carroll County Board of Education decided to shut down the old two-story brick elementary school on Main Street and build a new one on the outskirts.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1996
When McDonald's Corp. wanted to bring its famous burgers and fries to historic Annapolis five months ago, area business owners and residents objected loudly and vowed to fight the proposal every step of the way.But those voices of protest were curiously absent last night as McDonald's made its pitch to the City Council, presenting its application to open an express restaurant in the historic first block of West St."There is no use protesting any more," said Tony Cipriano, as he closed his restaurant, Tony's Pizza-n-Pasta, for the night.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Staff Writer | September 19, 1993
The people of Hereford, a rural town in northern Baltimore County, aren't sure they're ready for the golden arches and the smell of frying hamburgers.Early next month, the local community association will vote on whether it wants a McDonald's.Company representatives, who have mentioned one location off Interstate 83 at Mount Carmel and York roads, came to town Tuesday night to gauge community support. They found the audience at the Hereford Community Association meeting hotly divided."A McDonald's would draw traffic off the interstate and through our community.
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