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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Maryland Crab Flakes au Gratin, Finan Haddie Delmonico, Ham and Panned Oysters on Toast, Ginger Bread Pudding with Coffe Sauce. Dining on the rails was apparently quite something, with or without Eva Marie Saint at your table. A few events around town are paying tribute to the culinary achievements of the B&O line. On Wednesday night, Baldwin's Station will present Dining on the B&O -- Memories Alongside the Rails. The evening will include a menu created by Baldwin's chef Derrick Granai from the original B & O recipes Authors Karl D. Spence and Thomas Greco will give a behind-the-scenes look at their " Dining on the B&O: Recipes and Sidelights from a Bygone Era (John Hopkins University Press, 2009)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
We are supposed to be living in a new golden age of television. But you would never know that from the new series this summer. Despite months of hype about all the big names like Steven Soderbergh and Halle Berry who were going to be behind and in front of the cameras, none of the series even feels like silver at the halfway point of the season. Big names alone do not make for golden TV. In fact, sometimes the big names are only using TV to pass off inferior work that couldn't get big-screen funding.
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NEWS
By Judith Schlesinger and Judith Schlesinger,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 16, 1996
"The Golden Age of Promiscuity" by Brad Gooch Knopf. 301 pages. $24.This novel about the Seventies world of gay cliques and clubs offers some light but surprisingly little heat, for all its explicitness. The fabled promiscuity is numbing and dreamlike; often violent, it would be a nightmare if it had any passion.The narrator is Sean, a Columbia student in 1972 who drops out, moves to Greenwich Village, becomes a hard-core porn filmmaker and embarks on a series of joyless, experimental couplings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
Sunny Sighed remembers her first exposure to modern burlesque very well. She loved it, but never dreamed she'd soon be a part of it. Stripping off her clothes in front of an audience - well, even for a performer trained in acting, singing and dancing, that seemed a bit much. "I at first could not imagine being able to do it myself," she says of the night about eight years ago when she first saw local legends Trixie Little and the Evil Hate Monkey (real names: Beatrix Burneston and Adam Krandle)
NEWS
By Joseph R. L. Sterne and Joseph R. L. Sterne,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1996
"The Day Before Yesterday: Reconsidering America's Past, Reconsidering the Present," by Michael Elliott. Simon & Schuster. 292 pages. $24.Since the days of Tocqueville, Americans have learned to understand themselves better and see themselves clearer through the eyes of foreign observers.Michael Elliott is not a passing visitor. Like Alistair Cooke, he came to this country from England, settled here and has been fascinated ever since by the American phenomenon. This book is a summary of his impressions as former Washington bureau chief of the Economist and as current editor of Newsweek International.
NEWS
By Robert Reno | February 21, 1999
IF TELEVISION had a golden age, when would it have been?Many nostalgic people with flawed memories date it around the time Edward R. Murrow was making a legend of himself in the '50s. The legend, sadly, comes across as a fuzzy, pompous bore when rerun today. The situation comedies of the '50s cause the eyes to glaze before the first commercial.There followed in the '60s and '70s the glory days of broadcast networks, when they were overstaffed, spent money like drunks, killed good shows like homicidal maniacs, owned the airways, owned the Federal Communications Commission as well and first started paying their anchors seven-figure salaries.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | April 9, 2000
TV harks back to its first Golden Age at 9 p.m. today on WJZ, Channel 13, with a live, black-and-white broadcast -- an adaptation of "Fail Safe," the 1964 Cold War drama about a potential American nuclear strike on Moscow. Sidney Lumet directed the original film in which, thanks to a faulty transmission of orders, U.S. bombers are sent to the Soviet capital -- and make it past the point of no return before horrified military leaders can stop them. The original starred Dan O'Herlihy, Walter Matthau, and Fritz Weaver, with Henry Fonda as the president who must assure Soviet leaders it's all a terrible mistake.
FEATURES
By michael sragow and michael sragow,Sun movie Critic | December 1, 2006
The golden age of movie comedy may be right now. A gaggle of slaphappy artists and entertainers have made talking smart as much of a kick for the audience as talking at all was to the pioneers of movie sound. At the comic nadir of the late 1970s and early 1980s, Mel Brooks went into decline, Woody Allen turned "serious" and the first wave of Saturday Night Live comics seemed content to toss ingredients into a crockpot and bind them together with outlandish schtick and saucy dialogue. But today's comic wizards - such as Christopher Guest, Sacha Baron Cohen, Barry Levinson, Will Ferrell (and his frequent co-writer and director, Adam McKay)
EXPLORE
By Shaun Borsh | December 11, 2012
The marriage of two disciplines, mathematics and art, may seem an unlikely union given an artist's innate desire for free expression. Meet Helaman Ferguson, whose sculpture is known for its root in mathematical design. Ferguson, of North Laurel, recently completed a massive undertaking: a 2 1/2-story, 9-plus ton bronze and granite sculpture, Umbilic Torus SC. Commissioned by the Simons Foundation, a private institution committed to the advancement of science and mathematics, the torus is being donated to Stony Brook University, in Long Island, N.Y. Ferguson, 72, who holds a doctorate in mathematics, designed umbilic torus, a three-dimensional doughnut-shaped figure with a single edge.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | September 10, 2000
Gore Vidal, long the naughtiest boy of American literature, has in his 75th year become an almost warmly wise man -- maybe even a grown-up. With "The Golden Age"(Doubleday, 467 pages, $27.50), he has completed "The American Chronicles," his seven-volume exploration of the character and history of two centuries of the United States, presented in historical novels. It is a splendid work. With this publication by Doubleday, Vintage will release a paperback reissue of the preceding books: "Burr"(1973)
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
The indefatigable David Marsh, editor and author of For Who the Bell Tolls: One Man's Quest for Grammatical Perfection , demolishes in a brief article in the Guardian  the Trussites and all others who carry on about our degenerate and illiterate age.  " Conservatives long for a golden age, usually about 50 years in the past, when everyone knew their grammar and all was right with the world," he says. But the evidence is to the contrary.  The key piece of evidence, which you may wish to embroider on a sampler, is this:  "What is more, even Grammar, the basis of all education, baffles the brains of the younger generation today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2013
It's easy to find opera lovers who dismiss the present state of the art in favor of some distant "golden age. " Actually, it has always been that way. Folks who now wax nostalgic about, say, the heyday of Leontyne Price and Franco Corelli would have run into people back then saying, "You think this is great? You should have heard Ponselle and Martinelli. " And, of course, in the indisputably grand era of Caruso, you just know someone in the audience would have been going on and on about how much better it was back when Jean de Reszke was in his prime.
EXPLORE
By Shaun Borsh | December 11, 2012
The marriage of two disciplines, mathematics and art, may seem an unlikely union given an artist's innate desire for free expression. Meet Helaman Ferguson, whose sculpture is known for its root in mathematical design. Ferguson, of North Laurel, recently completed a massive undertaking: a 2 1/2-story, 9-plus ton bronze and granite sculpture, Umbilic Torus SC. Commissioned by the Simons Foundation, a private institution committed to the advancement of science and mathematics, the torus is being donated to Stony Brook University, in Long Island, N.Y. Ferguson, 72, who holds a doctorate in mathematics, designed umbilic torus, a three-dimensional doughnut-shaped figure with a single edge.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
Appropriately, given the prominent TV references, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra opens its 2012-2013 SuperPops season this weekend with a rerun — a program called "The Golden Age of Black and White. " This celebration of 1950s television and more first "aired" in 2006 and proved to be a vibrant, smoothly crafted example of the productions created by the Symphonic Pops Consortium, founded in Indianapolis by BSO principal pops conductor Jack Everly. The show's return promises an equally refreshing dip into the past.
NEWS
August 15, 2012
The Baltimore Orioles organization has done a very honorable job in acknowledging the players and manager who have had a profound impact on molding the team ("Jim Palmer, golden age figure, is now honored in bronze," July 15). The statues of the Jim Palmer, Earl Weaver , Eddie Murray  and Cal Ripken will forever remind us of the greatness of our beloved Orioles. Seeing my baseball heroes, however, was a reality check for myself. The hard truth is that these gentlemen are aging.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
Despite all that rubbish from linguists and lexicographers and other lax thinkers, we know perfectly well that there is an English, a Platonically perfect form of the language which so many in our shadowy cave-bound world mutilate. We also know, or at least sense, that there was once a time before our current degenerate era when that perfect English held sway, before the Young People defaced the language. It was a time when everyone wrote in impeccably grammatical English and spoke in Received Pronunciation.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 29, 1995
You just knew the scriptwriter of "Rod Serling: Submitted for Your Approval" wasn't going to be able to resist imitating the distinctive Serling style at some point. And there it is in the very first words and pictures of the 90-minute PBS biography airing as part of the distinguished "American Masters" series tonight at 9 on MPT and WETA.The scene is a hospital operating room filled with doctors and nurses desperately trying to save a patient. It's filmed in black and white."The man in cardiac arrest is Mr. Rod Serling -- writer, producer and agent provocateur of a certain electronic medium he helped to create and which, by way of thanks, kindly ushered him out the door," the voice of the omniscient narrator tells us. The camera pulls back and up to establish our point of view as god-like, looking down on the scene.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | February 9, 1998
When Dutch 17th-century printmaker Magdalena de Passe created her scene of an Egyptian pyramid for a series on the seven wonders of the world, she took a few liberties. Her pyramid has impressive arched doorways at ground level, more arched doorways halfway up the sides, equestrian statues at the corners and a female bust at the top. And it's set amid an elaborate array of other structures -- obelisks, domed buildings, monumental columns, even a spired tower that looks like it's on a Christian church.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Maryland Crab Flakes au Gratin, Finan Haddie Delmonico, Ham and Panned Oysters on Toast, Ginger Bread Pudding with Coffe Sauce. Dining on the rails was apparently quite something, with or without Eva Marie Saint at your table. A few events around town are paying tribute to the culinary achievements of the B&O line. On Wednesday night, Baldwin's Station will present Dining on the B&O -- Memories Alongside the Rails. The evening will include a menu created by Baldwin's chef Derrick Granai from the original B & O recipes Authors Karl D. Spence and Thomas Greco will give a behind-the-scenes look at their " Dining on the B&O: Recipes and Sidelights from a Bygone Era (John Hopkins University Press, 2009)
SPORTS
By Arda Ocal | March 8, 2012
In the past 30 years we have seen such an incredible change in the WWE. If you were alive to witness it, or if you went through the archives, you'll notice how unique and diverse each era has been, especially those eras of prosperity. With recent claims that WrestleMania 28 will become the most financially successful WrestleMania of all time, it seems that we are firmly entrenched in another upswing in WWE. The two previous eras of major upswing in WWE were the “Rock N' Wrestling” Era (roughly 1984-1991)
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