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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
No matter how often officials at the MacArthur Foundation keeps pointing out that they bestow "fellowships," people insist on calling them "genius awards" -- sort of the way people keep saying "Obamacare" instead of "Affordable Health Care Act. "  One reason why the "genius" tag has stuck, of course, is that so many of those receiving these annual pats on the back (at $625,000 a pat) really do seem like geniuses. They're certainly not like you and me. Jeremy Denk, one of the recent 2013 honorees, is a case in point.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
No matter how often officials at the MacArthur Foundation keeps pointing out that they bestow "fellowships," people insist on calling them "genius awards" -- sort of the way people keep saying "Obamacare" instead of "Affordable Health Care Act. "  One reason why the "genius" tag has stuck, of course, is that so many of those receiving these annual pats on the back (at $625,000 a pat) really do seem like geniuses. They're certainly not like you and me. Jeremy Denk, one of the recent 2013 honorees, is a case in point.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 22, 1995
Bach, "Goldberg Variations," performed by pianist Glenn Gould (CBC Records PSCD 2007); Bach, "Goldberg Variations," performed by Gould (Sony Classical SMK 52 685)Gould was a great mythmaker, and his testamentary in this regard has to do with two recordings of the "Goldbergs": His 1955 debut recording, with its optimism and athleticism, is the pianist's aubade to the dawn; his 1981 recording, which was released shortly before the pianist's death in 1982, are his evening vespers -- his devotional farewell to a musical work with which he was identified almost as much as the composer himself.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
If you forgot to plan a party to celebrate Bach's 328th birthday, no worries. You are welcome to join the one thoughtfully organized by Douglas Buchanan, director of music ministries at Old St. Paul's Episcopal Church in downtown Baltimore. This "Bach-analia," the first of what is envisioned as an annual event, will start at 7:30 tonight.  The program features a performance of Cantata No. 106 with the Camerata of Old St. Paul's and the Goldberg Variations, played on the piano by Buchanan.
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By Jim Kramon and Jim Kramon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 1995
I have always traveled light in summers, taking with me to our vacation home the minimum of possessions: an extra pair of eye glasses, whatever books I am reading and, of course, my CD of Glenn Gould's 1955 performance of the "Goldberg Variations."This latter item, since it cannot go unplayed for more than a day or two, I generally carry to the car like a life-support device. This year, I inadvertently took with me not Gould's celebrated world standard of the "Variations," but his surprise 1981 re-recording, done only a year before his death at age 50.I discovered my mistake when, one evening before dinner, I played the '81 recording.
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT | January 14, 1996
A WHILE BACK, one of the New York critics wrote a charming account of his continuing efforts to play Bach's famous keyboard masterpiece, "The Goldberg Variations." I empathized with his struggle, because for years I had been trying, with much less success, to acquaint my fingers with Bach's "Two- and Three-Part Inventions," 30 unprepossessing little studies the master wrote for the musical education of his eldest son."The Goldberg Variations" are virtuoso keyboard music, comparable in difficulty to the amazing prestidigitation of Scarlatti's harpsichord sonatas or Bach's own brilliant toccatas and fugues for organ.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
If you forgot to plan a party to celebrate Bach's 328th birthday, no worries. You are welcome to join the one thoughtfully organized by Douglas Buchanan, director of music ministries at Old St. Paul's Episcopal Church in downtown Baltimore. This "Bach-analia," the first of what is envisioned as an annual event, will start at 7:30 tonight.  The program features a performance of Cantata No. 106 with the Camerata of Old St. Paul's and the Goldberg Variations, played on the piano by Buchanan.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH | September 22, 2002
This past Wednesday would have been Glenn Gould's 70th birthday. Next week marks the 20th anniversary of the irreplaceable pianist's death. To mark the two occasions, Sony Classical has released a must-have, double commemoration: "Glenn Gould: A State of Wonder" (Sony Classical S3K 87703) - Gould's two downright historic recordings of Bach's Goldberg Variations, from 1955 and 1981. It's fitting that the Goldberg Variations turned out to be the musical bookends of Gould's life. The 1955 recording, full of astonishing finger work and fresh insights into Bach's genius, made him an instant star.
NEWS
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,Sun Music Critic | September 9, 2007
A couple of years ago, pianist Simone Dinnerstein barely registered on the name-recognition scale. She had no management, no publicist, no high-profile concert engagements. But when the New York native took a bold, do-it-yourself approach to career-building, things started to change. In 2005, she raised $15,000 from friends to make a professional recording of Bach's Goldberg Variations, and $6,000 more to rent out Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall to perform the demanding piece live in a concert that drew raves.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 22, 1998
It can be great musical fun.Take a tune, then slow it down, speed it up, fiddle with its harmonies, fool with its mood and change its key. Even play it backward if you want, and see what you get.Mozart did it. Listen to his "Variations on 'Ah, vous dirais-je maman,' " for example, and hear how the genius took the familiar "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star" melody and turned it every which way but loose.But the theme and variations format, as it is called, is often far more than musical parlor tricks.
NEWS
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,Sun Music Critic | September 9, 2007
A couple of years ago, pianist Simone Dinnerstein barely registered on the name-recognition scale. She had no management, no publicist, no high-profile concert engagements. But when the New York native took a bold, do-it-yourself approach to career-building, things started to change. In 2005, she raised $15,000 from friends to make a professional recording of Bach's Goldberg Variations, and $6,000 more to rent out Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall to perform the demanding piece live in a concert that drew raves.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH | September 22, 2002
This past Wednesday would have been Glenn Gould's 70th birthday. Next week marks the 20th anniversary of the irreplaceable pianist's death. To mark the two occasions, Sony Classical has released a must-have, double commemoration: "Glenn Gould: A State of Wonder" (Sony Classical S3K 87703) - Gould's two downright historic recordings of Bach's Goldberg Variations, from 1955 and 1981. It's fitting that the Goldberg Variations turned out to be the musical bookends of Gould's life. The 1955 recording, full of astonishing finger work and fresh insights into Bach's genius, made him an instant star.
FEATURES
By Kevin Eck and Kevin Eck,Contributing Writer | October 11, 1998
The undefeated World Championship Wrestling heavyweight champion, a tattooed mass of muscle with a shaved head and a goatee, is making his way to the ring. Emerging from a downpour of sparklers and smoke bombs that engulf his massive frame, the champ is literally blowing smoke through his nostrils as a sold-out arena of spectators chants his name.The elaborate entrance lasts nearly as long as most of his matches. It rarely takes more than two minutes for him to destroy his opponent, leading fans to pose a question that has become his catch phrase:"Who's next?"
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By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 9, 1998
By the time I began to write about dance in the San Francisco Bay Area in the mid-'80s, Jerome Robbins, always aloof, had reached the age and eminence that he didn't need to talk to dance critics on the Other Coast, as they call it in New York.So I never met him, though I did get a quote once, in writing, via his agent, when "Jerome Robbins' Broadway" stopped in San Francisco on its national tour.But I cherish my two Robbins sightings, which say something about the choreographer that I doubt he would have said about himself in words, if words we had exchanged.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 22, 1998
It can be great musical fun.Take a tune, then slow it down, speed it up, fiddle with its harmonies, fool with its mood and change its key. Even play it backward if you want, and see what you get.Mozart did it. Listen to his "Variations on 'Ah, vous dirais-je maman,' " for example, and hear how the genius took the familiar "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star" melody and turned it every which way but loose.But the theme and variations format, as it is called, is often far more than musical parlor tricks.
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT | January 14, 1996
A WHILE BACK, one of the New York critics wrote a charming account of his continuing efforts to play Bach's famous keyboard masterpiece, "The Goldberg Variations." I empathized with his struggle, because for years I had been trying, with much less success, to acquaint my fingers with Bach's "Two- and Three-Part Inventions," 30 unprepossessing little studies the master wrote for the musical education of his eldest son."The Goldberg Variations" are virtuoso keyboard music, comparable in difficulty to the amazing prestidigitation of Scarlatti's harpsichord sonatas or Bach's own brilliant toccatas and fugues for organ.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 9, 1998
By the time I began to write about dance in the San Francisco Bay Area in the mid-'80s, Jerome Robbins, always aloof, had reached the age and eminence that he didn't need to talk to dance critics on the Other Coast, as they call it in New York.So I never met him, though I did get a quote once, in writing, via his agent, when "Jerome Robbins' Broadway" stopped in San Francisco on its national tour.But I cherish my two Robbins sightings, which say something about the choreographer that I doubt he would have said about himself in words, if words we had exchanged.
FEATURES
By Kevin Eck and Kevin Eck,Contributing Writer | October 11, 1998
The undefeated World Championship Wrestling heavyweight champion, a tattooed mass of muscle with a shaved head and a goatee, is making his way to the ring. Emerging from a downpour of sparklers and smoke bombs that engulf his massive frame, the champ is literally blowing smoke through his nostrils as a sold-out arena of spectators chants his name.The elaborate entrance lasts nearly as long as most of his matches. It rarely takes more than two minutes for him to destroy his opponent, leading fans to pose a question that has become his catch phrase:"Who's next?"
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 22, 1995
Bach, "Goldberg Variations," performed by pianist Glenn Gould (CBC Records PSCD 2007); Bach, "Goldberg Variations," performed by Gould (Sony Classical SMK 52 685)Gould was a great mythmaker, and his testamentary in this regard has to do with two recordings of the "Goldbergs": His 1955 debut recording, with its optimism and athleticism, is the pianist's aubade to the dawn; his 1981 recording, which was released shortly before the pianist's death in 1982, are his evening vespers -- his devotional farewell to a musical work with which he was identified almost as much as the composer himself.
FEATURES
By Jim Kramon and Jim Kramon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 1995
I have always traveled light in summers, taking with me to our vacation home the minimum of possessions: an extra pair of eye glasses, whatever books I am reading and, of course, my CD of Glenn Gould's 1955 performance of the "Goldberg Variations."This latter item, since it cannot go unplayed for more than a day or two, I generally carry to the car like a life-support device. This year, I inadvertently took with me not Gould's celebrated world standard of the "Variations," but his surprise 1981 re-recording, done only a year before his death at age 50.I discovered my mistake when, one evening before dinner, I played the '81 recording.
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