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By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | September 15, 1992
I was really craving chocolate today, so I picked up a "single serving" package of Hershey's chocolate kisses.The nutrition labeling stopped me cold. Nine little kisses cost 240 calories and 13 grams of fat, about 1/3 of my fat budget for the day!I asked myself "How much is enough?" And settled for four, plus a carton of non-fat, Nutrasweet-ened yogurt. I satisfied my chocolate craving in the same number of calories, but fat dropped to 6 grams, while protein, calcium and vitamins soared.Lately I've seen commercials for junk food smugly proclaiming ,, "there ae no good foods and no bad foods."
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SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Kevin Van Valkenburg and Candus Thomson and Kevin Van Valkenburg,Sun reporters | February 19, 2008
COLUMBIA, MO. -- Six events, five gold medals. And if Katie Hoff's fingernails had been just a smidgen longer yesterday morning, she would have made it a clean sweep of her events at the Missouri Grand Prix. By the end of the meet, Hoff, of Towson, already owner of the world record in the 400-meter individual medley and the American record in the 200 IM, added two more U.S. marks. Her standout performance and versatility has U.S. swimming officials envisioning Hoff and Michael Phelps leading the charge in individual and relay events at the Beijing Olympics in August.
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NEWS
July 9, 1996
"YOU SHALL NOT press down upon the brow of labor this crown of thorns! You shall not crucify mankind upon a cross of gold!"With these words, spoken 100 years ago today, William Jennings Bryan sent the Democratic National Convention into a frenzy over an issue -- goldbugs versus silverites -- now relegated to history books. This newspaper commented it was "the first time. . . a delegate to a presidential convention has captured a presidential nomination by a single speech."And so it was. And so it is. There have been exciting convention moments since but nothing to compare with Bryan's oratory and passion.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | September 23, 2007
WASHINGTON-- --No matter who shows up at this week's Republican presidential debate in Baltimore, it's a good bet the biggest applause will go to the most conservative man onstage. He's Rep. Ron Paul, a perfect protest candidate for 2008. Trained as a physician, he's "Dr. Paul" to a small but growing base of fervent admirers - more than a few of whom could fairly be called zealots. Around the Capitol, the Texas congressman is "Dr. No," for his frequent, and often lonely, insistence on opposing any legislation that, in his view, exceeds the authority explicitly given to Congress by the framers of the Constitution.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | October 2, 1992
This is the 52nd presidential election.In the 30th, in 1904, Theodore Roosevelt sought election after three and a half years in the office. President McKinley had been shot and killed six months into that term.Conservative Republicans had pushed TR into the vice presidency to stop his reformist, progressive activism as governor New York. This he continued after his unexpected entry to the White House, to the distress of conservatives, but his popularity and control of the party made him secure.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | January 29, 2006
This year marks the dollar's 35th anniversary as a paper-only currency, freed from gold, launched into the blue and steered through the clouds by government bureaucrats. For most of those 35 years, the bureaucrat-in-chief has been Alan Greenspan, who swore by the gold standard and then did as much as anybody to bury it. The Federal Reserve chief, who retires this week, seemed to manage the paper money supply so brilliantly that the country had only two short recessions under his watch and doubled the size of its econo- my. But it's too early to declare him a genius and way too early to pronounce today's monetary setup a permanent success.
NEWS
By Joan Claybrook | July 30, 1997
BEFORE CONGRESS takes its August recess, the U.S. Senate will likely vote on a bill to reauthorize the Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA), a little-known but highly effective law that has succeeded in speeding up the safety and efficacy reviews needed before new drugs and medical devices are sold to the public.Unfortunately, some senators are using this bill as a vehicle to promote the reckless agenda of the pharmaceutical and medical device industries.Under the guise of "modernizing" the Food and Drug Administration, they are pushing Senate Bill 830, which in addition would roll back two decades of progress in making sure Americans have access to the world's safest, most effective drugs and medical devices.
NEWS
September 29, 1993
Hard SellMagnificent. Your editorial, "Helen Bentley and Ross Perot," Sept. 21, simplified the North American Free Trade Agreement argument from a complex issue to an attack on Rep. Helen Delich Bentley, R-Md., by using Gov. William Donald Schaefer (whom you lambaste the other 364 days) as proof that you are right. What an act.As a Second District staunch Democrat, I can assure you that Representative Bentley has earned our trust and respect and is serving us faithfully. Her "persistent protectionism" has been a cry for a level playing field.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 4, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Asia's financial turmoil has turned a global spotlight on a small, quiet but immensely powerful international agency whose mission is to tell governments and countries what they don't want to hear.The International Monetary Fund acts as a combination cop, fireman, judge and doctor of the world's economies. In the past decade, Russia, Mexico, and lately Thailand, Indonesia and South Korea have bowed to its will, confessed their misdeeds and accepted the fiscal equivalent of cold baths, tightened belts, bitter medicine and broccoli.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,Special to the Sun | July 6, 2005
Viva Latin America! Until quite recently, hollering these words probably wouldn't rally your troops to the dinner table. Yet, with an ever-growing Hispanic population in the United States, flavors from south of the border are increasingly finding their way into El Norte's cupboard. And what better time to experiment with them than summer, when picnics and barbecues encourage meal preparations that are more improvisational? So, as you weed your vegetable garden and hose off the grill, why not put on Remixes, the groovy CD by Brazilian songstress Bebel Gilberto, and allow yourself to be seduced by Latin American cuisine?
NEWS
By Julie Deardorff and Julie Deardorff,Chicago Tribune | November 17, 2006
It's the beginning of the influenza season, and despite the annual warnings from public health officials, I won't be getting a flu shot. Nor will I haul my doctor-phobic toddler into the pediatrician's office for one. I know the flu virus can cause complications in vulnerable populations with chronic conditions, and we're both considered high risk. I'm pregnant, and for the first time this year, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also suggests that healthy but germ-spreading children ages 2 through 5 receive flu shots.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | January 29, 2006
This year marks the dollar's 35th anniversary as a paper-only currency, freed from gold, launched into the blue and steered through the clouds by government bureaucrats. For most of those 35 years, the bureaucrat-in-chief has been Alan Greenspan, who swore by the gold standard and then did as much as anybody to bury it. The Federal Reserve chief, who retires this week, seemed to manage the paper money supply so brilliantly that the country had only two short recessions under his watch and doubled the size of its econo- my. But it's too early to declare him a genius and way too early to pronounce today's monetary setup a permanent success.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,Special to the Sun | July 6, 2005
Viva Latin America! Until quite recently, hollering these words probably wouldn't rally your troops to the dinner table. Yet, with an ever-growing Hispanic population in the United States, flavors from south of the border are increasingly finding their way into El Norte's cupboard. And what better time to experiment with them than summer, when picnics and barbecues encourage meal preparations that are more improvisational? So, as you weed your vegetable garden and hose off the grill, why not put on Remixes, the groovy CD by Brazilian songstress Bebel Gilberto, and allow yourself to be seduced by Latin American cuisine?
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2004
ATHENS - What am I going to do with the rest of my life? That country music line describes the crossroads that thousands of athletes encounter at the close of an Olympics. Then there is Michael Phelps, who favors rap and is nowhere near the end of his incredible swimming career. What is it like to be in position to become the most celebrated Olympic athlete ever and still be a teenager? The Athens Olympics end with tonight's closing ceremony, and as the Games' second week ended yesterday, nothing had changed from Week 1, when L'Equipe, the French sports daily, called Phelps the "man of the Olympics."
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2004
Phelps today 400 IM Record (holder): 4:09:09 (Phelps) Outlook: He expects to be pushed by Erik Vendt LONG BEACH, Calif. - The local forecast calls for highs in the 80s and humidity that Baltimore would envy, with a strong chance of history. The biggest crowds ever to watch an American swim meet other than the Olympic Games will cram into a temporary, outdoor facility here over the next week. As the sun sets on Southern California, conversation will likely center on a teen from Rodgers Forge.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2002
It grew into America's biggest restaurant chain - and one of the world's best-known brands - by serving up quick, consistent food at low prices. But once indomitable McDonald's Corp., home of the Happy Meal, the Hamburglar and Special Sauce, is limping these days amid an onslaught of competition, changing consumer trends and missteps. Now it's betting on an end-of-year management shake-up to help reverse a two-year slump. Some analysts wonder whether the Golden Arches' luster can be restored.
NEWS
By Julie Deardorff and Julie Deardorff,Chicago Tribune | November 17, 2006
It's the beginning of the influenza season, and despite the annual warnings from public health officials, I won't be getting a flu shot. Nor will I haul my doctor-phobic toddler into the pediatrician's office for one. I know the flu virus can cause complications in vulnerable populations with chronic conditions, and we're both considered high risk. I'm pregnant, and for the first time this year, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also suggests that healthy but germ-spreading children ages 2 through 5 receive flu shots.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | September 23, 2007
WASHINGTON-- --No matter who shows up at this week's Republican presidential debate in Baltimore, it's a good bet the biggest applause will go to the most conservative man onstage. He's Rep. Ron Paul, a perfect protest candidate for 2008. Trained as a physician, he's "Dr. Paul" to a small but growing base of fervent admirers - more than a few of whom could fairly be called zealots. Around the Capitol, the Texas congressman is "Dr. No," for his frequent, and often lonely, insistence on opposing any legislation that, in his view, exceeds the authority explicitly given to Congress by the framers of the Constitution.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2002
SALT LAKE CITY - Circle Feb. 21 on the calendar. Take the phone off the hook. Send the kids to the movies. Perhaps the best duel since Roger Clemens vs. Pedro Martinez will be fought on the ice of the E Center, if all goes according to the script. The U.S. women's hockey team will try to repeat its 1998 gold-medal performance against archrival Canada. "All of our players know that when we play this team, it's a life-and-death struggle," said U.S. coach Ben Smith. The Olympics' preliminary competition is a two division round-robin.
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