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By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2011
Zoey Whittington, a multiple-season, All-Metro sprinter at Catonsville, won her third straight state title in the 400-meter dash Saturday. Her best time is believed to be the fifth-fastest by a high school girl in the United States this spring. She also anchored the Comets' gold medal-winning 1,600 relay team. As a guard in basketball, the senior averaged 16 points, five steals and four assists, and earned Most Valuable Player honors for her side at the Baltimore City-County Senior All-Star Game.
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SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2011
Zoey Whittington, a multiple-season, All-Metro sprinter at Catonsville, won her third straight state title in the 400-meter dash Saturday. Her best time is believed to be the fifth-fastest by a high school girl in the United States this spring. She also anchored the Comets' gold medal-winning 1,600 relay team. As a guard in basketball, the senior averaged 16 points, five steals and four assists, and earned Most Valuable Player honors for her side at the Baltimore City-County Senior All-Star Game.
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FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | September 27, 1992
BODIE, Calif. -- Waterman S. Bodey discovered gold in Bodie in 1859, but it was not until 1874 that miners hit the bonanza. By 1877 the gold rush was on.The boom lasted just four years. Exploration and assessment continued, as did small-scale mining operations and occasional comebacks, such as the 1890s with the coming of electricity and the cyanide extraction process."There has been uninterrupted mining and exploration here for the past 135 years," stresses Mark Whitehead, of Bodie Consolidated Mining Co., a division of Galactic Resources Ltd.Mining techniques and gold prices alternately spurred or stymied operations.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2010
While Apple Inc. is enjoying the early success of its iPad tablet computer, the tech giant has once again captured the imagination of those looking to make a buck from its latest gadget. Among them are the creative workers at Fastspot, a Baltimore interactive design firm that built a new digital game for the device months before they even had it in hand. When the iPad went on sale this month, their "Jumbalaya" word game was one of the first applications available in Apple's iPad App Store.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | March 25, 2007
Heyday Kurt Andersen Random House / 624 pages / $26.95 Kurt Andersen knows culture. Most readers will recognize him for his pithy interviews on NPR's Studio 360 or his jaunty wit as the co-founder of Spy magazine or as the savvy former editor of New York magazine. Anderson is a regular Renaissance guy, as anyone who tunes in on his radio pieces knows. One week he's having a dead-serious discussion about photography and the metaphysics of writing with Susan Sontag just before her death, another he's jocularly squeezing details from David Milch about George Bush's frat days at Yale.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2000
In a desperate moment before finals, a worried college student pulling an all-nighter grabs his laptop, anxious to tap into the vast world of knowledge that a wireless connection to the Internet provides. But he can't connect. His wireless Palm Pilot won't work either. Desperate, he grabs an old-fashioned cordless phone, hoping to call a friend who can answer his questions. Again he's stymied. The phone, like all the other wireless gadgets that are supposed to make it easy to get information, is overwhelmed by the transmissions of thousands of other students in a half-mile radius.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 14, 2003
SHANGSHAN, China - The oxygen tank at Wu Shengfu's side fills his scarred lungs with enough air to breathe but not enough to talk for long about why, at 48 years old, he will be dying soon. His friends do their best to help explain, even at the risk of being harassed by police, because many of them too will succumb to an early death. Slowly, the men of this village in central China are dying, and the local authorities here, having profited from their labors, would prefer that they die in silence.
TRAVEL
By John Flinn and John Flinn,San Francisco Chronicle | August 29, 2004
In 1941, James Hilton, the British author of Lost Horizon, was on a lecture tour of the United States. Inevitably, a reporter asked him: In all your wanderings, what's the closest you've found to a real-life Shangri-La? (He was referring to the hidden paradise at the center of the story, where the inhabitants lived very long lives.) "A little town in northern California," the writer responded, presumably with a wistful, far-away look in his eye. "A little town called Weaverville." I thought the comparison was pushing it a bit, but I started to wonder as I drove into this pretty alpine hamlet, which is cradled by snow-tipped peaks, and found a weathered string of Tibetan Buddhist prayer flags flapping along the main street.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Hiltbrand and David Hiltbrand,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 21, 2005
Can't find anything to watch on TV? Try turning on your computer, where viewers' options are virtually unlimited. With the phenomenal growth of high-speed Internet connections, more people are choosing their entertainment, news and sports by clicking a mouse, not a remote. The untapped potential of this market has set off a modern-day gold rush. "All these different industries are in a mad scramble to control Internet television," said Pete Snyder, chief executive officer of New Media Strategies, an online marketing firm.
FEATURES
By Jean Allen and Jean Allen,SUN-SENTINEL, SOUTH FLORIDA | February 22, 1998
We are in the process of choosing a ship for an Alaska cruise this year.All the ships sound good, so we will choose on the basis of ports of call. Aside from cruising Glacier Bay, which we definitely will do, which port would you say not to miss?Of all the ports of call when I cruised Alaska a couple of years ago, the one I remember most vividly and would most like to see again is Skagway.Alaska this year celebrates the centennial of the gold rush of 1898, so Skagway is in the spotlight because it was there that shiploads of prospectors arrived from Seattle to start their long trek to the gold fields of Canada's Klondike.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com and Sun Movie Critic | February 14, 2010
Imagine "McCabe & Mrs. Miller," "The Treasure of the Sierra Madre" and "Deadwood" hand-stitched together and given a novel slant as a mini-epic of Chinese immigrant life. That suggests the polyglot vitality of Baltimore writer Christopher Corbett's new nonfiction book, "The Poker Bride." An unofficial follow-up to his rollicking frontier saga, "Orphans Preferred: The Twisted Truth and Lasting Legend of The Pony Express" (2003), "The Poker Bride," a juicy combination of social history and deconstructed myth, pivots on the fact-based Old West legend of Polly Bemis.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | November 22, 2009
Thomas Streett patiently waited in a cubicle at Smyth Jewelers in Timonium on a recent Saturday as a sales associate examined two gold rings and a gold pocket watch he brought in for sale. The verdict: The high school ring he bought in 1955 for $17 fetched $186. The wedding band from a marriage that ended more than 40 years ago was worth about $65. His grandfather's watch was merely gold-filled, and Smyth wasn't interested. But Streett was pleased. "Obviously, if I had known in 1955 how much gold was going to be worth, I would have bought a half-dozen class rings and stashed them away," says the 73-year-old retiree, who plans to use the cash on a trip to Las Vegas next month.
NEWS
By Andrew Kipkemboi and Andrew Kipkemboi,Sun Reporter | June 29, 2008
A one-of-a-kind California Gold Rush coin, preserved for years by one of Baltimore's most prominent families, will return here next month for the first time in nearly 30 years. The 154-year-old $20 gold piece known as the Kellogg Twenty - now worth $3 million - will be displayed during the American Numismatic Association World's Fair of Money in the Baltimore Convention Center from July 30 to Aug. 2. Once owned by Baltimore resident and diplomat John Work Garrett, the coin is considered by collectors to be one of the finest American coins from the mid-19th century.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,Sun Reporter | June 20, 2008
Ken Brown and Jon-Paul Rippetoe haven't worked out all the details of their fall wedding, but they do know a few things: They will hold their ceremony on a mountainside in South Lake Tahoe, Calif. Rippetoe's sister, who will be deputized for the day by the county, will officiate. They will write their own vows separately and read them during the ceremony. They also know that when they return to Maryland from California, their marriage license will not carry any legal weight. But that is not stopping them from joining a wave of gay and lesbian couples from around the nation who are California-bound in the wake of a May ruling by that state's Supreme Court giving same-sex couples the right to marry.
FEATURES
January 24, 2008
Jan. 24 1848 James W. Marshall discovered a gold nugget at Sutter's Mill in California, a discovery that led to the gold rush of '49. 1965 Winston Churchill died in London at age 90.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN REPORTER | November 12, 2007
Real estate agents offering to help defense workers find homes. Law firms peddling their expertise in negotiating military contracts. Management and sales consultants tendering advice on how to sell to the government or contractors. The huge nationwide military base shuffle has spawned a cottage industry of businesses and entrepreneurs hoping to cash in on the influx of up to 60,000 jobs and 28,000 households to Maryland.
FEATURES
By Jay Clarke and Jay Clarke,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 28, 1997
There's still gold in these hills, but it's the kind that comes from tourists.A century and a half ago, places like Grass Valley, Calif. and neighboring Nevada City became instant towns when gold was found in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Untamed and unwashed, these hill towns rewarded a few Forty-Niners with fortunes but punished far more with an endless parade of dashed hopes. When most of the mines closed during or just after World War II, many of the towns sank into obscurity.
FEATURES
January 24, 2008
Jan. 24 1848 James W. Marshall discovered a gold nugget at Sutter's Mill in California, a discovery that led to the gold rush of '49. 1965 Winston Churchill died in London at age 90.
BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | May 11, 2007
MINNEAPOLIS -- At a time when farmers nationally are planting more corn than they did a year ago to capitalize on the ethanol boom, not everyone will be rolling in cash after the harvest. "We're not planting more corn because corn is cool," said Ed Usset, an economist with the University of Minnesota Extension Service. "The economics are there. The ethanol craze is driving this." But farmers face higher fuel costs and higher feed costs for their livestock. Landowners have raised rents on farmland.
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