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NEWS
July 7, 1994
A photo caption in The Sun's June 24 editions implied incorrectly that a workman was painting gilding onto the roof of the Nationsbank building downtown. In fact, the worker was applying an adhesive varnish, to which thin sheets of gold leaf were attached and burnished.The Sun regrets the error.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Keith L. Alexander, The Washington Post | July 31, 2013
Moments before D.C. police found Jiamei Tian hiding in a bathroom stall at Washington National Cathedral, a family of tourists had spotted her in a back pew of the Children's Chapel guarding two bags and muttering softly in a foreign language. Tian's unsettling behavior continued Tuesday, when the 58-year-old Chinese national made her first appearance in D.C. Superior Court to face charges in connection with a string of vandalism in which churches and tourist attractions across the city, including two chapels at the cathedral, were spattered with green paint.
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NEWS
June 24, 1994
A photo caption in The Sun's June 24 editions implied incorrectly that a workman was painting gilding onto the roof of the Nationsbank building downtown. In fact, the worker was applying an adhesive varnish, to which thin sheets of gold leaf were attached and burnished.The Sun regrets the error.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN REPORTER | December 11, 2007
A local medispa has unveiled a new facial treatment for Baltimore's skin care junkies that is as good as gold. To be more accurate, it is gold. Diana Gavrila, owner of Diana's European Skin Care in Timonium, has recently begun offering clients a 24-karat gold facial. The facial, new to the United States, was introduced in the past year by UMO, a Japanese skin-care company. Gavrila's is the only spa in Maryland that provides the treatment, although it is offered at upscale salons in other states.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | November 26, 1992
For many Baltimoreans, there is a minimystery in the plaques showing clasped hands and 1794 -- in gleaming gold leaf -- that adorn thousands of houses and other buildings in the area.Are they address markers? No. Do they indicate the building's age? No.They are "fire marks," relics of an earlier time. They show the building is insured by Maryland's oldest fire insurance company, the Baltimore Equitable Society, founded in 1794 by a group of local merchants.In the days before paid fire service, volunteer fire companies refused to put out blazes in uninsured buildings and fought over which unit would battle a particular fire.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | December 3, 1994
How do you take $40,000 worth of gilded picture frames, in sections up to 25 1/2 feet long, from Baltimore to Philadelphia? Very carefully.And in a school bus.That's how they went yesterday from the gold leaf studio of R. Wayne Reynolds on Falls Road to the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, where the frames will be joined with two huge paintings by early American artist Benjamin West.For many years the paintings -- "Christ Rejected" (1814) and "Death on the Pale Horse" (1817) -- have had only simple black strip frames.
FEATURES
By Beth Smith | May 12, 1991
Baltimore artist R. Wayne Reynolds is not a magician. But he can perform what seems like magic. Taking a tiny piece of flat, paper-like, 22-karat gold, he rubs it between his fingers and presto -- no gold. The shiny piece of deep yellow metal is gone.But Mr. Reynolds, a graduate of the Maryland Institute of Art with a degree in painting, isn't in the business of making gold vanish. He is a gilder who specializes in the conservation and restoration of gilded objects. He also designs, builds and gilds original frames and makes reproductions of period frames.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | June 16, 1994
Starting time is 6:30 a.m. for a batch of young artists who wear gold-flecked hard hats to work.After ascending elevators to the 34th floor of the Maryland National Bank Building, they scale a grid of ladders to reach their work site -- the mansard-style roof of the landmark 1929 office building at 10 Light St. in downtown Baltimore.The roof is known as the bonnet, a name that newspapers gave this distinctive hood that tops the building that was the city's tallest when it opened.The roof is a 60-foot-high architectural hat -- something of a tiara -- majestic, steeply tapered and showing its age. For the past couple of months, this chapeau has been forced to wear a large metal scaffolding veil.
FEATURES
By Beth Smith | May 12, 1991
Interior designer Alexander Baer weaves a thread through his new home in Guilford. And the thread is gold. Each room has just the right gold touch to add a subtle exclamation point to a classic design scheme. Rich in dark woods, elegant fabrics, antiques, contemporary art and gold highlights, the interior beautifully complements the gracious French-inspired town residence, which was designed by Laurence Hall Fowler in the 1920s."I really think if you went through my house you would find a little bit of gilding or gold leaf in every room, even the kitchen," says Mr. Baer.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | August 21, 1994
Before NationsBank removed the giant "mn" letters last April from atop the former Maryland National Bank Building in Baltimore, its executives vowed to make the "bonnet" underneath look as good as new.Now that the $300,000 project is complete -- including repairs to the copper shingles and a new coat of gold leaf on the "ribs" and cornice -- it is apparent the bankers weren't exactly true to their word. They made it look even better.The restored tower at 10 Light St. -- now renamed the NationsBank Building -- never before looked the way it does today.
FEATURES
By MARY MCNAMARA and MARY MCNAMARA,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 24, 2006
HOLLYWOOD -- The host gets the photo shoot, the nominees get the luncheon and the winners, of course, get the Oscars. But the people who make the Academy Awards telecast possible get the cool Oscar gear - sweat shirts and hats emblazoned with the show's number and famous logo. That and all the assorted "truck food" they can eat. The Academy Awards show is consistently the largest entertainment-driven live broadcast in the world, and it takes roughly 1,000 people to make it happen. At this year's production meeting, there were more than 200 in the room, representing the disparate areas of expertise the show requires, from the medical staff to the stage manager, from the set designer to the telephone technician, the limousine coordinator to the director.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1998
Quarterbacks may not be quite worth their weight in gold these days, but they're getting close.Bobby Beathard, the general manager of the San Diego Chargers, paid a king's ransom to the Arizona Cardinals to move up one spot from third to second in the draft to get a quarterback.He swapped his first-round pick and gave up his second-round pick this year, a first-round choice next year and two players (kick returner Eric Metcalf and linebacker Patrick Sapp) to get the quarterback.If Peyton Manning is taken by Indianapolis -- which the Colts figure to do even though he had an average workout last week -- Beathard will grab Ryan Leaf.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | December 3, 1994
How do you take $40,000 worth of gilded picture frames, in sections up to 25 1/2 feet long, from Baltimore to Philadelphia? Very carefully.And in a school bus.That's how they went yesterday from the gold leaf studio of R. Wayne Reynolds on Falls Road to the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, where the frames will be joined with two huge paintings by early American artist Benjamin West.For many years the paintings -- "Christ Rejected" (1814) and "Death on the Pale Horse" (1817) -- have had only simple black strip frames.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | October 30, 1994
The baseball strike hasn't been settled; nor has the NHL's lockout. But two card companies have their solutions to the dilemma of the exchange cards for the games that haven't been played.Super Team cards were inserted randomly in Topps' Series I Stadium Club baseball for the second year. Cards could be redeemed for prizes if the team pictured won its division, league or the World Series.Topps is postponing the exchanges and will honor '94 cards for the 1995 winners, according to spokesman Stu Wade, even though Super Team cards also are planned for '95 Stadium Club.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | August 21, 1994
Before NationsBank removed the giant "mn" letters last April from atop the former Maryland National Bank Building in Baltimore, its executives vowed to make the "bonnet" underneath look as good as new.Now that the $300,000 project is complete -- including repairs to the copper shingles and a new coat of gold leaf on the "ribs" and cornice -- it is apparent the bankers weren't exactly true to their word. They made it look even better.The restored tower at 10 Light St. -- now renamed the NationsBank Building -- never before looked the way it does today.
NEWS
July 7, 1994
A photo caption in The Sun's June 24 editions implied incorrectly that a workman was painting gilding onto the roof of the Nationsbank building downtown. In fact, the worker was applying an adhesive varnish, to which thin sheets of gold leaf were attached and burnished.The Sun regrets the error.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | October 30, 1994
The baseball strike hasn't been settled; nor has the NHL's lockout. But two card companies have their solutions to the dilemma of the exchange cards for the games that haven't been played.Super Team cards were inserted randomly in Topps' Series I Stadium Club baseball for the second year. Cards could be redeemed for prizes if the team pictured won its division, league or the World Series.Topps is postponing the exchanges and will honor '94 cards for the 1995 winners, according to spokesman Stu Wade, even though Super Team cards also are planned for '95 Stadium Club.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Staff Writer | January 23, 1994
Underfoot once again are floorcloths, now coated in plasticThis winter Home magazine wrote about a revival of floorcloths -- those practical, elegant, decorative canvas coverings that graced George Washington's home at Mount Vernon. For Colonial-style homes (the most enduringly popular design in this area) they offer an authentic accent. And in any home they can serve as an original work of art that's as durable as it is beautiful. Modern-day floorcloths are painted on heavy canvas and then coated in plastic so they can handle serious traffic.
NEWS
June 24, 1994
A photo caption in The Sun's June 24 editions implied incorrectly that a workman was painting gilding onto the roof of the Nationsbank building downtown. In fact, the worker was applying an adhesive varnish, to which thin sheets of gold leaf were attached and burnished.The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | June 16, 1994
Starting time is 6:30 a.m. for a batch of young artists who wear gold-flecked hard hats to work.After ascending elevators to the 34th floor of the Maryland National Bank Building, they scale a grid of ladders to reach their work site -- the mansard-style roof of the landmark 1929 office building at 10 Light St. in downtown Baltimore.The roof is known as the bonnet, a name that newspapers gave this distinctive hood that tops the building that was the city's tallest when it opened.The roof is a 60-foot-high architectural hat -- something of a tiara -- majestic, steeply tapered and showing its age. For the past couple of months, this chapeau has been forced to wear a large metal scaffolding veil.
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