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By Lisa Anderson and Lisa Anderson,Chicago Tribune | March 18, 1992
Perhaps as a maverick reaction to the leaden economy and the New Age asceticism that quickly has attained the sort of chic once reserved for Chanel suits, fashion's recent romance with shiny stuff has become a fever for spring -- gold fever.On both sides of the Atlantic, Midas-minded designers have mined a mountain of golden accessories and glimmery fabrics. There are enough gilt buttons to outfit the British navy and enough golden chains -- wrapping necks, wrists and waists -- to sink it.In Milan, Gianni Versace piled on the gold, from golden coins trimming pockets and shoes to belts of gilt starfish slung low around silk jeans.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2011
A recent column on the wreck of the steamer Clara Nevada, which went to the bottom in 1898 while returning from the Alaska gold fields with the loss of all hands and a cargo of gold dust worth $13.6 million today, brought interesting reader feedback. The story of the Clara Nevada was brought to life by Steven C. Levi, an Anchorage-based freelance and technical writer, in his recent book, "The Clara Nevada: Gold, Greed, Murder and Alaska's Inside Passage. " The lust for riches set off gold fever, as thousands packed suitcases and whatever they could carry on their backs and headed West for Seattle and Portland, gateway to the Klondike.
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FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | July 30, 1992
Has Anita Nall won a silver and a bronze, or has she lost two golds?Media coverage of the Olympics -- from television reporters asking athletes how they feel about not winning a gold to headlines like The Sun's "Towson's Nall must settle for bronze" -- might lead you to believe the latter.It's a reflection of what one sports psychologist calls an "obsession" with the top medal, and thus the diminishment of silver and bronze."In the Olympics in the '30s and the '40s, it was considered an honor just to get there," said James M. Jarvis, a St. Louis-based sports psychologist.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2011
The wreck of the Clara Nevada in Alaskan waters at the height of the Klondike gold rush in 1898 has a Baltimore connection and is the subject of a recently published book, "The Clara Nevada: Gold, Greed, Murder and Alaska's Inside Passage. " "It's a fairly well-known story in southeast Alaska," said Steven C. Levi, an Anchorage freelance and technical writer. "They tell it on the ferries, and the first time I heard about the Clara Nevada, I didn't believe it and decided to look into it," "And the more research I did, the stranger the story became," he said in a telephone interview last week.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 30, 1997
JAMESTOWN, Calif. -- For John Evans, who makes most of his living putting up drywall not far from this old mining outpost in the Sierra foothills, the secret of finding gold lies in seizing nature's fleeting clues.After 20 years of trying, Evans has yet to hit the mother lode. But he and hundreds of other weekend prospectors say the record rains that fell on California in the winter may provide them with the clues of a lifetime.He has been joined by serious miners and first-timers who are flocking to the rivers and streams of this area, about 100 miles east of San Francisco, on the theory that erosion may have revealed rich deposits.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2011
The wreck of the Clara Nevada in Alaskan waters at the height of the Klondike gold rush in 1898 has a Baltimore connection and is the subject of a recently published book, "The Clara Nevada: Gold, Greed, Murder and Alaska's Inside Passage. " "It's a fairly well-known story in southeast Alaska," said Steven C. Levi, an Anchorage freelance and technical writer. "They tell it on the ferries, and the first time I heard about the Clara Nevada, I didn't believe it and decided to look into it," "And the more research I did, the stranger the story became," he said in a telephone interview last week.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2011
A recent column on the wreck of the steamer Clara Nevada, which went to the bottom in 1898 while returning from the Alaska gold fields with the loss of all hands and a cargo of gold dust worth $13.6 million today, brought interesting reader feedback. The story of the Clara Nevada was brought to life by Steven C. Levi, an Anchorage-based freelance and technical writer, in his recent book, "The Clara Nevada: Gold, Greed, Murder and Alaska's Inside Passage. " The lust for riches set off gold fever, as thousands packed suitcases and whatever they could carry on their backs and headed West for Seattle and Portland, gateway to the Klondike.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III | June 25, 2000
As a medium that ties far-flung places together, the Internet has succeeded splendidly at making the world a smaller place. At the same time, however, this invention has indirectly transformed some of Canada's more remote mining communities into veritable ghost towns. The actual cause of this irony of technological advancement is probably more dramatic than the effect. About two dozen Canadian mining companies, their profits down because of falling prices for raw materials, have reformulated themselves as Internet venture-capital funds during the past year - pulling the plug on their mining operations and consigning those distant mining towns to the tumbleweeds.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker | February 24, 1996
... TC The Triple Crown prep season gets serious today when early Kentucky Derby favorite Unbridled's Song takes on seven rivals in the $200,000 Fountain of Youth Stakes at Gulfstream Park.Despite the defection of Appealing Skier, a strong field is due to test Unbridled's Song, including the D. Wayne Lukas entry of Editor's Note, Victory Speech and Gold Fever.New Farm's Appealing Skier, trained by Ben Perkins Sr., beat the Derby choice in the seven-furlong Hutcheson Stakes on Feb. 4. That was considered a tuneup for the Breeders' Cup Juvenile champion.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 4, 2000
Maryland moved closer to its first $10 million horse auction yesterday as 179 yearlings sold for a total of $3,872,000 at the Fasig-Tipton Midlantic Eastern Fall Yearlings Sale at the Timonium fairgrounds. After two days of the three-day sale, 376 thoroughbreds have sold for $8,167,300. The average sale price of $21,722 is well ahead of last year's three-day average of $19,114. Six more yearlings sold yesterday for $100,000 or more, raising the two-day total of six-figure horses to 16. During the entire sale last year, 15 yearlings sold for $100,000 or more.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III | June 25, 2000
As a medium that ties far-flung places together, the Internet has succeeded splendidly at making the world a smaller place. At the same time, however, this invention has indirectly transformed some of Canada's more remote mining communities into veritable ghost towns. The actual cause of this irony of technological advancement is probably more dramatic than the effect. About two dozen Canadian mining companies, their profits down because of falling prices for raw materials, have reformulated themselves as Internet venture-capital funds during the past year - pulling the plug on their mining operations and consigning those distant mining towns to the tumbleweeds.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 30, 1997
JAMESTOWN, Calif. -- For John Evans, who makes most of his living putting up drywall not far from this old mining outpost in the Sierra foothills, the secret of finding gold lies in seizing nature's fleeting clues.After 20 years of trying, Evans has yet to hit the mother lode. But he and hundreds of other weekend prospectors say the record rains that fell on California in the winter may provide them with the clues of a lifetime.He has been joined by serious miners and first-timers who are flocking to the rivers and streams of this area, about 100 miles east of San Francisco, on the theory that erosion may have revealed rich deposits.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | July 30, 1992
Has Anita Nall won a silver and a bronze, or has she lost two golds?Media coverage of the Olympics -- from television reporters asking athletes how they feel about not winning a gold to headlines like The Sun's "Towson's Nall must settle for bronze" -- might lead you to believe the latter.It's a reflection of what one sports psychologist calls an "obsession" with the top medal, and thus the diminishment of silver and bronze."In the Olympics in the '30s and the '40s, it was considered an honor just to get there," said James M. Jarvis, a St. Louis-based sports psychologist.
FEATURES
By Lisa Anderson and Lisa Anderson,Chicago Tribune | March 18, 1992
Perhaps as a maverick reaction to the leaden economy and the New Age asceticism that quickly has attained the sort of chic once reserved for Chanel suits, fashion's recent romance with shiny stuff has become a fever for spring -- gold fever.On both sides of the Atlantic, Midas-minded designers have mined a mountain of golden accessories and glimmery fabrics. There are enough gilt buttons to outfit the British navy and enough golden chains -- wrapping necks, wrists and waists -- to sink it.In Milan, Gianni Versace piled on the gold, from golden coins trimming pockets and shoes to belts of gilt starfish slung low around silk jeans.
FEATURES
By Jean Allen and Jean Allen,SUN-SENTINEL, SOUTH FLORIDA | February 22, 1998
We are in the process of choosing a ship for an Alaska cruise this year.All the ships sound good, so we will choose on the basis of ports of call. Aside from cruising Glacier Bay, which we definitely will do, which port would you say not to miss?Of all the ports of call when I cruised Alaska a couple of years ago, the one I remember most vividly and would most like to see again is Skagway.Alaska this year celebrates the centennial of the gold rush of 1898, so Skagway is in the spotlight because it was there that shiploads of prospectors arrived from Seattle to start their long trek to the gold fields of Canada's Klondike.
FEATURES
By Jay Clarke and Jay Clarke,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 28, 1997
There's still gold in these hills, but it's the kind that comes from tourists.A century and a half ago, places like Grass Valley, Calif. and neighboring Nevada City became instant towns when gold was found in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Untamed and unwashed, these hill towns rewarded a few Forty-Niners with fortunes but punished far more with an endless parade of dashed hopes. When most of the mines closed during or just after World War II, many of the towns sank into obscurity.
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