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By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2000
Three years ago, when Carroll County Arts Council was searching for a winter fund-raiser, someone suggested the group hold a Christmas crafts show. "Please don't make me. There's a million of those already," Sandy Oxx, the group's executive director, remembered saying. Instead, the group decided to auction decorated wreaths that had been donated by people in the community. Selling 24-inch circles of faux pine boughs festooned with ribbons and berries seemed like a practical, seasonal way to raise money, Oxx thought.
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FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | July 15, 2013
I admire J.K. Rowling for resisting the urge to kick back on her own private island, one paved with gold coins from the royalties on her Harry Potter series. Not only has she published "The Casual Vacancy," an "adult" novel (as if HP was only for kids), but she has now been outed as the author of a well-received mystery. The Sunday Times revealed that Rowling wrote "The Cuckoo's Calling" under the name Robert Galbraith and kept up the pretence that it was the work of a married father of two and former undercover investigator.
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NEWS
October 3, 2001
Proud Patriot The bald eagle was chosen on June 20, 1782, as the emblem of the United States of America because of its strength and majestic looks. The image of the eagle can be seen on all the gold coins, the silver dollar, half dollars and quarters. what's for DINNER? Bald eagles live along the coastline and near water; therefore, their diet is mostly fish.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2012
Barb and Greg Damon traveled to Maryland from Oregon to run a marathon and left with an unusual souvenir. The Damons were among the first people who went to Fort McHenry Monday to purchase commemorative coins created by the United States Mint to mark the bicentennial of the War of 1812. Barb Damon said she and her husband ran in the B&A Trail Marathon over the weekend as part of a quest to complete a marathon in every state. She said they also collect coins and couldn't pass up the chance to purchase a coin on the first day it was issued.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N RASMUSSEN,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | September 7, 2008
The story of two Baltimore teenagers and their random discovery of a cache of gold coins in a copper jug while digging in the dirt cellar floor of a three-story rowhouse at 132 S. Eden St. became a national story during the height of the Depression. Theodore Jones, 16, and Henry Grob, 15, both from fatherless families who were on relief, had formed a club, the "Rinky-Dinky-Doos," and were busy digging a hole on the warm afternoon of Aug. 31, 1934, in the floor of the Eden Street tenement where Jones and his mother resided.
NEWS
October 18, 1996
County police arrested a Deale man Wednesday on charges of stealing jewelry, coins and a television from a Shady Side home.Jesse Herbert Mitchell, 33, of the 5900 block of Rockhold Drive was charged with burglary and felony theft.Police went to a house in the 4900 block of West End Ave. about 12: 30 a.m. Fredus E. Proctor Jr., owner of the house, told officers someone took an air conditioner from a rear window, climbed in and stole a 13-inch television, four diamond rings, two gold coins and two gold chains from a bedroom.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau | July 1, 1993
CAESAREA, Israel -- Stare for long at the blue sea here with Kenneth Holum, and you will find yourself in the past.The University of Maryland professor will take you back 1,600 years, back to a great city on the eastern shore of the Mediterranean, an important outpost of the Roman Empire. This is Caesarea, pride of Herod the Great, provincial capital for the Holy Land.In A.D. 400 -- four centuries after Herod built it -- the city is comparatively quiet. It is no longer vogue to throw Christians to the lions in the amphitheater, and the sweeping invasion by Muslims -- and brutal reprisals of the Crusaders -- are yet to engulf the city.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | July 15, 2013
I admire J.K. Rowling for resisting the urge to kick back on her own private island, one paved with gold coins from the royalties on her Harry Potter series. Not only has she published "The Casual Vacancy," an "adult" novel (as if HP was only for kids), but she has now been outed as the author of a well-received mystery. The Sunday Times revealed that Rowling wrote "The Cuckoo's Calling" under the name Robert Galbraith and kept up the pretence that it was the work of a married father of two and former undercover investigator.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | June 13, 1999
The Peruvian sol failed to shine. The Tongan pa'anga was no big thing. People at the coin convention did not notice the ceramic notgeld minted during the German hyperinflation of the 1920s and did not flip over the 1909 Lincoln penny.Gold coins captured most of the attention Friday at the Atlantic Rarities Coin Exposition, which ends today at the Baltimore Convention Center.Driven by fears that widespread computer failures will cause the international banking system to collapse on Jan. 1, survivalists preparing the barter economy of the apocalypse are fueling reported rises in precious metal sales from coin dealers in Baltimore and nationally.
NEWS
June 10, 1997
Elizabeth C. "Nancy" Smith, the 82-year-old Columbia recluse who died in February, had an affinity for gold. Much of her $1.8 million in stocks was in South African gold mining companies, and her $11,000 coin collection was dominated by gold coins.Those holdings were revealed in a partial inventory of her possessions filed last week in the Howard County Orphans' Court by attorneys for two of Smith's cousins -- Carolyn Smith of Baltimore and Tabi Williamson of Eureka, Calif. They will inherit Smith's 300 acres of undeveloped farmland along Route 175.Smith, who died without a will, was not married.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2011
The U.S. Mint unveiled the designs Wednesday for two limited-issue coins that will be available in March to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812. The $5 gold piece and the silver dollar pay homage to the national anthem, Fort McHenry and the Battle of Baltimore. The Mint issues only two commemorative coins annually, and many organizations vie for the recognition and funding from the sales. Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, who sponsored the legislation for the bicentennial coins in the U.S. House, said he had to gather more than 250 signatures from colleagues.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N RASMUSSEN,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 19, 2008
Weeks later, and I'm still getting mail and phone calls about columns I wrote in September and August. Readers are still fascinated with the tale of Theodore Jones and Henry Grob, poor Baltimore teens who unearthed gold coins in the basement of an Eden Street tenement in 1934. What brought the story back from musty newspaper and legal archives was the recent publication of Leonard Augsburger's Treasure in the Cellar: A Tale of Gold in Depression-Era Baltimore. Howard J. Sapp, 80, a retired Social Security Administration disability examiner, wrote me. He said that one of the boy's parents paid a debt to his grandfather, owner of a Caroline Street store, with a 2 1/2 -dollar gold piece from the stash.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N RASMUSSEN,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | September 28, 2008
My column several weeks ago chronicling the Depression-era story of two Baltimore youths, Theodore Jones, 16, and Henry Grob, 15, who turned up 3,558 gold coins in the dirt cellar of an Eden Street tenement, brought some interesting responses. A full-length account of the find and subsequent legal wrangling over who owned the stash of coins that today would be worth more than $10 million is the subject of Leonard Augsburger's Treasure in the Cellar: A Tale of Gold in Depression-Era Baltimore, which was recently published by the Maryland Historical Society.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N RASMUSSEN,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | September 7, 2008
The story of two Baltimore teenagers and their random discovery of a cache of gold coins in a copper jug while digging in the dirt cellar floor of a three-story rowhouse at 132 S. Eden St. became a national story during the height of the Depression. Theodore Jones, 16, and Henry Grob, 15, both from fatherless families who were on relief, had formed a club, the "Rinky-Dinky-Doos," and were busy digging a hole on the warm afternoon of Aug. 31, 1934, in the floor of the Eden Street tenement where Jones and his mother resided.
BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG | April 22, 2008
THE Q: We Buy Gold, the commercials say. You've probably seen the ads on TV and in newspapers. With gold prices at or near record highs lately, more and more people are taking a second look at the precious metals sitting in their jewelry boxes and drawers, wondering if they should sell, sell, sell. Harvey Galinn, a 70-year-old Towson resident, has been thinking about selling American Eagle gold coins dating from 1993 to 1997. "I was just wondering what the process is?" Galinn said. "I sell it to somebody and then they resell it or do they melt it down?
BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | April 8, 2008
RALEIGH, N.C. -- Gold comes in a variety of flavors when it comes to investing. You can buy the metal itself - gold coins and gold bullion. You can buy shares of individual gold-mining companies or mutual funds that invest in a slew of mining businesses. Then there are ETFs, or exchange traded funds - you buy and sell them like stocks - that track the price of gold. Be aware, however, that investment experts are split about whether investing in gold in any shape or form is wise. Some counsel that gold has a place in a well-rounded, diversified investment portfolio, but that investments in it and other commodities should not exceed 5 percent of your total investments.
BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG | April 22, 2008
THE Q: We Buy Gold, the commercials say. You've probably seen the ads on TV and in newspapers. With gold prices at or near record highs lately, more and more people are taking a second look at the precious metals sitting in their jewelry boxes and drawers, wondering if they should sell, sell, sell. Harvey Galinn, a 70-year-old Towson resident, has been thinking about selling American Eagle gold coins dating from 1993 to 1997. "I was just wondering what the process is?" Galinn said. "I sell it to somebody and then they resell it or do they melt it down?
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1998
Spring, and Baltimore's fancy turns to thoughts of gold! For free! At the Inner Harbor amphitheater! Just show your Maryland driver's license!More than 100 people raced downtown yesterday morning after WQSR-FM's drive-time radio host Steve Rouse used his top-rated morning show to spread word of the fabulous offer from the "Constellation Restoration Committee."Many of the breathless and greedy finally met reality in the form of police officers, tourist information workers and Constellation officials, who gently reminded them of the date.
NEWS
October 3, 2001
Proud Patriot The bald eagle was chosen on June 20, 1782, as the emblem of the United States of America because of its strength and majestic looks. The image of the eagle can be seen on all the gold coins, the silver dollar, half dollars and quarters. what's for DINNER? Bald eagles live along the coastline and near water; therefore, their diet is mostly fish.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 14, 2001
GERMISTON, South Africa - Fears that the U.S. economy is souring and heading toward a recession might cause most business owners to groan but here at the world's largest gold refinery, just south of Johannesburg, those are signs, perhaps, of better times to come. Like snow-blower salesmen before a blizzard, managers of Rand Refinery Limited are hoping that economic uncertainty ushers in the comeback of their once best-selling, later banned, and now largely forgotten gold coin: the Krugerrand.
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