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HEALTH
By Andrea K. walker | May 1, 2012
Baltimore health officials have launched a program they hope will give paramedics more information to treat the elderly and people with disabilities. They are asking people to fill out Gold Card forms that will list crucial health information, such as whether someone suffers from diabetes. The Gold Card can then be displayed visibly in a person's home or carried in a wallet. If there is ever a medical emergency this will help medical staff with treatment options and decrease the likelihood of complications, health officials hope.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. walker | May 1, 2012
Baltimore health officials have launched a program they hope will give paramedics more information to treat the elderly and people with disabilities. They are asking people to fill out Gold Card forms that will list crucial health information, such as whether someone suffers from diabetes. The Gold Card can then be displayed visibly in a person's home or carried in a wallet. If there is ever a medical emergency this will help medical staff with treatment options and decrease the likelihood of complications, health officials hope.
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BUSINESS
By Gail Stephanie Miles and Gail Stephanie Miles,Special to The Evening Sun | June 20, 1991
A program that offers student discounts at stores in Baltimore will be continued during the next school year because sponsors believe it has helped prevent truancy. However, some merchants say they have attracted very few shoppers despite the $l discounts.The Gold Card program, which began last Septemberencourages attendance by rewarding students at participating middle schools in the city. Some students qualify by attending school 90 percent of the month. Those with chronic absences must improve their attendance record by four days compared with the previous month.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg and John Eisenberg,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2002
The three-year spending spree that left the Ravens with a pounding salary cap headache after last season wasn't regarded as a radical plan in the NFL's decision-making corridors. Teams striving to win a Super Bowl typically sign clusters of players to contracts with minimal immediate salary cap impact, knowing the day will come when they have to slash their rosters because of the escalating cost of the buy-now, pay-later deals. The Ravens' antidote for their cap headache wasn't at all typical, however.
FEATURES
By Roger Catlin and Roger Catlin,The Hartford Courant | March 7, 1991
Paul Simon regrets his decision to have his current tour sponsored by American Express Gold Card, after receiving criticism that it was elitist. The Gold Card carries a $75 annual fee and is issued only to approved applicants older than 18 with a minimum annual salary of $20,000.Critics say the sponsorship doesn't fit Simon's image as a socially conscious singer-songwriter.In an interview, Simon called corporate sponsorship for his tour, which employs 17 musicians, "an economic fact of life."
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin | August 30, 1991
Two Baltimore County residents alleged to have misled consumers in a "gold card" credit-marketing scheme have agreed to give up the business and $100,000 in frozen assets to settle a fraud complaint filed by the Federal Trade Commission.Between 8,000 and 10,000 people -- most of them in Maryland and the Washington area -- did business with the companies operated by the defendants, who advertised on television and ++ newspapers with such appeals as, "Need credit for the holidays?" and "Instant $1,500 line of credit," the FTC said yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Dinah Zeiger and Dinah Zeiger,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 14, 1992
Credit cards are hard to come by. About 60 percent of all applicants for new cards are rejected, industry experts say, as issuers tighten their lending standards.It's even tougher to get a secured credit card. The American Financial Services Association estimates that 1.5 million Americans apply for secured cards this year, but only about one-third of applicants will qualify.Secured cards, born in the 1980s, are growing up fast in the '90s as the number of personal bankruptcies soar and lenders become more averse to risk.
NEWS
February 1, 1993
Honor roll students due shopping discountsBeginning Feb. 16, first- and second-quarter honor roll students at Hammond High School can go shopping at Columbia Mall with their "gold cards."Fashioned after the American Express Gold Card, the shopping plates will be presented to top students at a school assembly and will entitle them to discounts of 10 percent to 20 percent at 12 participating mall stores.The "Go for the Gold" program is the brainchild of Hammond Assistant Principal Roger Plunkett, who worked out the agreement with the merchants and arranged to have the cards printed at no charge by American Speedy Printers.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Staff Writer | October 31, 1993
In the world of collectibles, a license to produce NBA trading cards is a rare and valuable thing.Despite interest from other card companies, especially after last season's success featuring Shaquille O'Neal, the NBA is not issuing more licenses."
BUSINESS
By Georgia C. Marudas and Georgia C. Marudas,Evening Sun Staff | July 12, 1991
Consumers finally are beginning to see some downwar movement in credit-card interest rates as competition builds among card issuers."Competition is definitely heating up," says Gail Liberman, editor of Bank Rate Monitor, a weekly newsletter. "What's happening is that a number of banks are coming out with additional credit cards that are aggressively priced."Robert McKinley of Frederick-Md. based RAM Research, a credit-card tracking service, believes pressures will mount on the nation's top 10 card issuers to trim their rates before year's end.The top 10 issuers, which control over half the market, have kept interest rates above 19 percent despite the fact that other rates have fallen substantially.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | September 10, 1995
Next month marks the 40th anniversary of the Brooklyn Dodgers' only World Series championship.Topps, which was founded in Brooklyn, is honoring the "Boys of Summer" with its 1995 Archives set. The cards are based on cards issued by Topps and Bowman (now owned by Topps) between 1952 and 1956. The Dodgers were also in the 1952, '53 and '56 Series.Of the 165 cards, 127 are reprints of every Topps and Bowman player card from those years with a Brooklyn Dodger on them. Thirty-one cards feature Dodgers who were not on Topps or Bowman cards in those years, and their cards are based on Topps or Bowman designs for the year they would have appeared.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | August 28, 1994
When football Hall of Famer O. J. Simpson was arrested in June, he had signed contracts for a number of memorabilia ventures.The publicity surrounding his being charged with the murders of his ex-wife and her friend sent demand for -- and prices of -- Simpson memorabilia soaring.One contract was canceled last week by the manufacturer, and another is being re-examined.Sports, Accessories & Memorabilia, which had a contract with Simpson and had produced a prototype bobbing head doll of him, will not manufacture the doll and has destroyed the mold.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Staff Writer | October 31, 1993
In the world of collectibles, a license to produce NBA trading cards is a rare and valuable thing.Despite interest from other card companies, especially after last season's success featuring Shaquille O'Neal, the NBA is not issuing more licenses."
NEWS
February 1, 1993
Honor roll students due shopping discountsBeginning Feb. 16, first- and second-quarter honor roll students at Hammond High School can go shopping at Columbia Mall with their "gold cards."Fashioned after the American Express Gold Card, the shopping plates will be presented to top students at a school assembly and will entitle them to discounts of 10 percent to 20 percent at 12 participating mall stores.The "Go for the Gold" program is the brainchild of Hammond Assistant Principal Roger Plunkett, who worked out the agreement with the merchants and arranged to have the cards printed at no charge by American Speedy Printers.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,1992, Washington Post Writers Group | December 13, 1992
New York -- This year's strategic holiday shopper i minimizing credit-card debt. It's hard not to put at least some Christmas presents on the cuff. But here are 19 ideas for cutting your interest costs:* Consolidate the bills on your lowest-rate credit card, a loan from a credit union or a home-equity line of credit. It doesn't pay to open a home-equity line just for Christmas bills. That's because banks could charge several hundred dollars for start-up costs. But if you have a line already, the interest rate might run from 7 percent to 7.5 percent, tax-deductible.
BUSINESS
By Dinah Zeiger and Dinah Zeiger,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 14, 1992
Credit cards are hard to come by. About 60 percent of all applicants for new cards are rejected, industry experts say, as issuers tighten their lending standards.It's even tougher to get a secured credit card. The American Financial Services Association estimates that 1.5 million Americans apply for secured cards this year, but only about one-third of applicants will qualify.Secured cards, born in the 1980s, are growing up fast in the '90s as the number of personal bankruptcies soar and lenders become more averse to risk.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | August 28, 1994
When football Hall of Famer O. J. Simpson was arrested in June, he had signed contracts for a number of memorabilia ventures.The publicity surrounding his being charged with the murders of his ex-wife and her friend sent demand for -- and prices of -- Simpson memorabilia soaring.One contract was canceled last week by the manufacturer, and another is being re-examined.Sports, Accessories & Memorabilia, which had a contract with Simpson and had produced a prototype bobbing head doll of him, will not manufacture the doll and has destroyed the mold.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,1992, Washington Post Writers Group | December 13, 1992
New York -- This year's strategic holiday shopper i minimizing credit-card debt. It's hard not to put at least some Christmas presents on the cuff. But here are 19 ideas for cutting your interest costs:* Consolidate the bills on your lowest-rate credit card, a loan from a credit union or a home-equity line of credit. It doesn't pay to open a home-equity line just for Christmas bills. That's because banks could charge several hundred dollars for start-up costs. But if you have a line already, the interest rate might run from 7 percent to 7.5 percent, tax-deductible.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin | August 30, 1991
Two Baltimore County residents alleged to have misled consumers in a "gold card" credit-marketing scheme have agreed to give up the business and $100,000 in frozen assets to settle a fraud complaint filed by the Federal Trade Commission.Between 8,000 and 10,000 people -- most of them in Maryland and the Washington area -- did business with the companies operated by the defendants, who advertised on television and ++ newspapers with such appeals as, "Need credit for the holidays?" and "Instant $1,500 line of credit," the FTC said yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Georgia C. Marudas and Georgia C. Marudas,Evening Sun Staff | July 12, 1991
Consumers finally are beginning to see some downwar movement in credit-card interest rates as competition builds among card issuers."Competition is definitely heating up," says Gail Liberman, editor of Bank Rate Monitor, a weekly newsletter. "What's happening is that a number of banks are coming out with additional credit cards that are aggressively priced."Robert McKinley of Frederick-Md. based RAM Research, a credit-card tracking service, believes pressures will mount on the nation's top 10 card issuers to trim their rates before year's end.The top 10 issuers, which control over half the market, have kept interest rates above 19 percent despite the fact that other rates have fallen substantially.
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