Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGoheen
IN THE NEWS

Goheen

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 2, 2006
MILDRED C. GOHEEN, age 92, on Monday, January 30, 2006. Born in Mt. Rainier, MD she is the beloved aunt of Karen Benson (Douglas), John D. (Cecilia), Robert J. (Bernadette) and Gary T. (Stephanie) Engelstad. Also survived by eight great-nieces and nephews. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 11 a.m. Friday, February 3, 2006 at St. James Catholic Church, 3628 Rhode Island Avenue, Mount Rainier, Maryland. Visitation at church will begin at 10 a.m. Interment Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Washington, DC.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 2, 2006
MILDRED C. GOHEEN, age 92, on Monday, January 30, 2006. Born in Mt. Rainier, MD she is the beloved aunt of Karen Benson (Douglas), John D. (Cecilia), Robert J. (Bernadette) and Gary T. (Stephanie) Engelstad. Also survived by eight great-nieces and nephews. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 11 a.m. Friday, February 3, 2006 at St. James Catholic Church, 3628 Rhode Island Avenue, Mount Rainier, Maryland. Visitation at church will begin at 10 a.m. Interment Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Washington, DC.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 6, 1991
Services for J. Joseph Goheen, an official with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and a former resident of Baltimore, will be held at noon tomorrow at the Western Presbyterian Church, 19906 H St. N.W., Washington.Mr. Goheen, assistant chief of the FDIC's corporate training branch since 1978, died of cancer Friday at the Hospice of Washington at the age of 49. He had lived the past 12 years in Falls Church, Va.Born in Quinwood, W.Va., Mr. Goheen was reared in Baltimore. He was a 1960 graduate of City College and received his undergraduate degree four years later from what is now Towson State University.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1997
With electrical tape and screwdriver in tow, Paul Goheen travels the United States in search of air bags to disconnect. The Texan was in Baltimore yesterday to work on the cars of several older women -- all frightened of their air bags.For many, Goheen is a kind of savior -- doing a job no one else will.His customers share a fear that has been fueled by reports of five dozen air bag-related deaths, most involving unbuckled children and short women seated close to the air bag.In Maryland, some of Goheen's customers have been unable to find a local mechanic to disconnect their air bags, even though they have the required permission from the federal government to have the work done.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | November 29, 1992
About 200 gallons of heating oil is believed to have spilled into a small stream from a leaky refrigeration unit at an Elkridge food distributor Thursday night, state environmental officials said.Representatives from the Maryland Department of the Environment were called to the scene of the spill at Hearn-Kirkwood Corp., in the 6600 block of Santa Barbara Road, about 10 p.m., said John Goheen, a department spokesman.County fire crews tried to prevent the oil from moving downstream and used absorbent materials to soak up what they could, Mr. Goheen said.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | February 17, 1991
State environmental officials are negotiating with North Carroll Shopping Center and the former owners of a dry cleaner there to recoup the cost of cleaning contaminated ground water behind the building, said the Maryland Department of the Environment.Current C & C Dry Cleaners owner Charley Pak is not responsible and didn't own the business when the contamination was found in 1987, said department spokesman John Goheen. Pak bought the business in 1989.The MDE will continue testing residential wells as a precaution and hopes to start a cleanup by the end of the year, Goheen said.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | February 9, 1993
Howard County police and the Maryland Department of the Environment are asking for help in finding a $5,000 nuclear gauge containing small amounts of radioactive material that was stolen from a construction site in Ellicott City over the weekend.The yellow, 15- by 9- by 7-inch encapsulated device isn't life-threatening, said John Goheen, a spokesman for the department."It really isn't dangerous at all, as long as pieces of equipment haven't been tampered with," Mr. Goheen said.Anyone tampering with the device could be exposed to small amounts of cesium and americium, which could cause skin irritation, he said.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | February 3, 1991
Aside from six containers of materials the Environmental Protection Agency has been unable to identify, workers have completed the cleanup of chemicals found in the basement of a Patapsco Road home after the death of their owner.The chemicals are sealed and stored in a shed at the home until results return from a private laboratory, said John Goheen, a spokesman for the Maryland Department of the Environment.Department-ordered tests of soil and residential wells at the house and five adjacent properties show no contamination, Goheen said, and MDE plans no further testing.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1997
With electrical tape and screwdriver in tow, Paul Goheen travels the United States in search of air bags to disconnect. The Texan was in Baltimore yesterday to work on the cars of several older women -- all frightened of their air bags.For many, Goheen is a kind of savior -- doing a job no one else will.His customers share a fear that has been fueled by reports of five dozen air bag-related deaths, most involving unbuckled children and short women seated close to the air bag.In Maryland, some of Goheen's customers have been unable to find a local mechanic to disconnect their air bags, even though they have the required permission from the federal government to have the work done.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | March 3, 1991
The state has approved a plan by Black & Decker US Inc. to clean ground water behind its plant here, possibly starting this summer.Black & Decker will pay for the cleanup, said Linda Biagioni, director of environmental affairs at the company's Towson headquarters.The company submitted its plan to the state Department of the Environment in December 1989 and had been waiting for the agency to review and act on it, Biagioni said.While investigating gasoline tank leakage from another Hampstead business in 1984, the Department of the Environment found contamination in a production well behind Black & Decker.
NEWS
May 7, 1993
A public comment meeting regarding Lehigh Portland Cement's proposal to burn tires as a fuel has been tentatively set for 6:30 p.m. June 2 at the Union Bridge Community Center."
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | February 9, 1993
Howard County police and the Maryland Department of the Environment are asking for help in finding a $5,000 nuclear gauge containing small amounts of radioactive material that was stolen from a construction site in Ellicott City over the weekend.The yellow, 15- by 9- by 7-inch encapsulated device isn't life-threatening, said John Goheen, a spokesman for the department."It really isn't dangerous at all, as long as pieces of equipment haven't been tampered with," Mr. Goheen said.Anyone tampering with the device could be exposed to small amounts of cesium and americium, which could cause skin irritation, he said.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | November 29, 1992
About 200 gallons of heating oil is believed to have spilled into a small stream from a leaky refrigeration unit at an Elkridge food distributor Thursday night, state environmental officials said.Representatives from the Maryland Department of the Environment were called to the scene of the spill at Hearn-Kirkwood Corp., in the 6600 block of Santa Barbara Road, about 10 p.m., said John Goheen, a department spokesman.County fire crews tried to prevent the oil from moving downstream and used absorbent materials to soak up what they could, Mr. Goheen said.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | August 16, 1992
Spencer Sand & Gravel Inc., the controversial Abingdon rubble fill where tests revealed high levels of suspected carcinogens in monitoring wells, has been shut down by state environmental officials.The state Department of the Environment ordered Spencer to stop accepting rubble Aug. 5 amid questions about whether the company had illegally expanded its operation.John Goheen, a department spokesman, said the agency allowed Spencer's permit to expire Aug. 6 because a topographic map, which would show whether rubble was deposited only in the permitted area, had not been updated.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | August 2, 1992
The Spencer Sand & Gravel Inc. rubble fill will remain closed for at least two more months as the company finishes work to comply with a year-old county law regulating dumps.The law requires rubble fill companies to meet about a dozen operating standards, such as installing fences and equipment to wash the wheels of trucks leaving dump sites."They're all being implemented," said William Geary, spokesman for the Abingdon company.Spencer also is conducting routine maintenance work, such as upgrading roads, planting grass and improving erosion controls, Geary said.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | April 16, 1992
State regulators cracked down on the operation of the troubled Millersville Landfill late yesterday afternoon, giving the county five months to construct an environmentally sound facility.The Maryland Department of the Environment served County Executive Robert R. Neall with a complaint for violations of state environmental laws, including the operating permit.The agency ordered the county to take immediate steps, including the construction of a new disposal cell with a plastic liner and pollutant collection system, to bring the Burns Crossing Road facility back into compliance.
NEWS
May 7, 1993
A public comment meeting regarding Lehigh Portland Cement's proposal to burn tires as a fuel has been tentatively set for 6:30 p.m. June 2 at the Union Bridge Community Center."
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | August 2, 1992
The Spencer Sand & Gravel Inc. rubble fill will remain closed for at least two more months as the company finishes work to comply with a year-old county law regulating dumps.The law requires rubble fill companies to meet about a dozen operating standards, such as installing fences and equipment to wash the wheels of trucks leaving dump sites."They're all being implemented," said William Geary, spokesman for the Abingdon company.Spencer also is conducting routine maintenance work, such as upgrading roads, planting grass and improving erosion controls, Geary said.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | October 27, 1991
An Abingdon rubble fill operation says the company won't negotiate giving the county property easements for access to a major water line unless the county moves quickly on granting a permit for the company to expand its operation.The company, Spencer's Sand & Gravel, hasbeen seeking county permission for the expansion for more than nine months.If the operation were to close because it could not expand, Harford would be left with only one licensed private rubble fill area for dumping -- Pappy's Inc., Oak Avenue in Joppa.
NEWS
By John Rivera Sun reporter Kerry O'Rourke contributed to this article | October 20, 1991
Dundalk residents awoke yesterday morning to a fine mess: (( oily black soot covering their cars, yards and houses. They spent much of the day trying to wash it off.The mysterious soot probably came from a malfunctioning industrial boiler, state environmental officials said, but that had not determined the location of such a source."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.