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NEWS
June 5, 2001
Summer is nearly here, and the goggles are everywhere some considerations when you buy: Besides improving underwater vision, goggles help keep chlorine and unknown "gunk' from your eyes, reduce glare and help prevent infection. Water is kept out by suction or closed-cell foam. Which type you buy comes down to personal preference. The foam tends not to leave temporary red marks around your eyes; suction types, fitted properly, may keep water out a bit better. Try to make the suction type stick against your eye sockets briefly without the strap to help ensure good fit. Lens color - clear, blue, gray, smoke, etc. Most lenses these days block UV light; that's important.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
Sports Digest | October 2, 2013
Swimming Ledecky, Pelton, Kalisz nominated for Golden Goggle Awards Olympic gold medalist and world champion Katie Ledecky of Bethesda received nominations for four USA Swimming Golden Goggle Awards, including Female Athlete of the Year. The awards will be announced Nov. 24 at the JW Marriott in Los Angeles. The nation's top swimmers and coaches are nominated in eight categories. Nominations are based on the year's top accomplishments by U.S. swimmers, focusing primarily on the FINA World Championships.
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SPORTS
By Jerry Crowe, Tribune Newspapers | March 3, 2011
PISMO BEACH, Calif. — Horace Grant is so enchanted by his adopted home on California's central coast that he might be mistaken for a realtor or tourism-council spokesman. "It's so serene," he says. "It's such a beautiful area. " At the moment, the former Lakers forward is seated in the living room of a rented hilltop home high above Pismo Beach. Out the window on a clear winter day, views of the jagged coastline are magnificent, stretching from San Luis Obispo Bay to the northwest, the shimmering Pacific Ocean dead ahead and, to the south, the Pismo Dunes Natural Preserve and beyond.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
A Florida man who sold military-style night-vision goggles without a license to an undercover agent in Baltimore - believing him to be an overseas buyer - was sentenced to 18 months in prison and three years of probation late Wednesday, prosecutors announced Thursday. Anthony J. Torresi, of Coral Gables, had posted the goggles on eBay, and sold them to an undercover U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent in Baltimore in 2011, prosecutors in U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein's office said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
A Florida man who sold military-style night-vision goggles without a license to an undercover agent in Baltimore - believing him to be an overseas buyer - was sentenced to 18 months in prison and three years of probation late Wednesday, prosecutors announced Thursday. Anthony J. Torresi, of Coral Gables, had posted the goggles on eBay, and sold them to an undercover U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent in Baltimore in 2011, prosecutors in U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein's office said.
SPORTS
By Marty Knack and Marty Knack,Special to The Sun | August 26, 1991
EDMONTON, Alberta -- Anita Nall will keep her goggles on much tighter in the future.Nall, 15, from Towson (Md.) High School, lost her goggles during her women's 200-meter breast-stroke heat at the Pan Pacific swimming championships yesterday.It cost the girl with the second-fastest time in the world this year a spot in the final at the major meet of the season for 15 Asian, North American and South American nations."I was so nervous," said Nall, who was timed in 2 minutes, 34.66 seconds."My goggles fell off after the second 50. Everything becomes so unfocused.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | May 14, 1992
For someone with normal vision, putting on the gray plastic headgear is a little like stepping through the tube and into the slightly fuzzy, black-and-white world of "The Honeymooners," or some other 1950s-era television show.But for some of the 2.5 million Americans with poor eyesight that can't be corrected by conventional glasses or other treatments, the video goggles unveiled yesterday by Johns Hopkins researchers and NASA could be a liberating experience, doctors say.The goggles could give some people the ability to cook and clean for themselves, shop, read a newspaper, go bowling or even recognize loved ones -- all by watching tiny televisions mounted inches from their eyes.
SPORTS
By Rubin E. Grant and Rubin E. Grant,Special to The Sun | March 16, 1995
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. -- The biggest obstacle facing Mount St. Mary's might not be playing 13th-ranked Alabama on its home court in the East Regional of the NCAA women's tournament.Instead, it might be whether the delivery man arrives in time before the 13th-seeded Mountaineers (24-5) meet the fourth-seeded Crimson Tide (20-8) tonight at approximately 9:30 at Coleman Coliseum.Susie Rowlyk, the Mount's leading scorer at 15.8 points, is questionable because of an eye injury suffered in a collision with an official.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2005
As determined as he is to make sure Marylanders wear seat belts, the thought of state troopers peering into cars on Rockville Pike with the same technology Special Forces use on night raids in Baghdad was a bit too much for Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. Ehrlich ordered the state police yesterday never to repeat its experiment using night-vision goggles to catch violators of the state's seat belt law. "The governor is committed to making sure Maryland's safety...
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2004
When it comes to the protective eyewear required in girls lacrosse this season, Hereford's Katie Braid sees things a lot differently than most of her peers. A year ago, she suffered exactly the kind of eye injury the goggles are designed to protect against. During an intrasquad scrimmage, Braid made a cut through the arc just as a teammate fired off a shot. The ball hit Braid on the right side of her face next to her eye. "I remember falling on the ground and a couple seconds later, horrendous pain," said Braid, now a senior.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
A 34-year-old Florida man pleaded guilty late Wednesday to illegally selling night vision goggles and other military style gear online to an undercover federal agent in Baltimore pretending to be an overseas buyer — a charge that could land him in prison for 20 years. Anthony J. Torresi, of Coral Gables, did not have the required U.S. Department of State license to sell the items when he posted them on eBay and then arranged to sell them to a buyer who he believed was in New Zealand, according to the Maryland U.S. Attorney's Office of Rod J. Rosenstein.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | November 20, 2012
Swimming Phelps, Schmitt, Ledecky win Golden Goggle honors Michael Phelps of Baltimore was named Male Athlete of the Year on Monday night at the USA Swimming Golden Goggle Awards, held at the New York Marriott Marquis. Phelps capped his career at the London Olympics by becoming the most decorated Olympian in history, with 22 medals, 18 of which are gold. Katie Ledecky of Bethesda took home two awards, earning Breakout Performer of the Year and Female Race of the Year for her American-record performance in the 800-meter free.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | October 9, 2012
Horse racing Laurel Park race features rare double dead heat The seventh race at Laurel Park went down to the wire Monday afternoon as four horses arrived at the finish line together, resulting in a dead heat for first and a dead heat for third. The one-mile turf race for was for optional claiming runners. The final charge to the finish line included 21-1 shot Rockaby Bay and Masterel, who tied for the win, and Elkhorn Creek and Colonel Bill, who tied for third, a neck behind the winners.
BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2012
Not a lot has changed in the jockey goggle business since 1947, when Israel Kroop first stitched trim around a molded sheet of plastic, added two brass vents from a mattress, and attached a strip of elastic. Kroop's design — a made-in-Maryland variation on miners' protective eyewear — was an instant hit with jockeys at the Laurel racetrack and at Pimlico. It didn't take long for the invention to catch on outside Maryland. Riders around the country swapped cumbersome motorcycle goggles for the wafer-thin, well-ventilated models.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest, Special to The Sun | April 17, 2011
Recently called one of the "rock stars who make things happen" by the Economic Alliance of Greater Baltimore, city technology leader Jayfus Doswell is a modern-day Renaissance man. While his job focuses on developing cutting-edge technologies, Doswell also works to break ground for new businesses and research in Baltimore. On top of that, he is committed to helping young people from underprivileged backgrounds learn the skills that will allow them to succeed, too. Doswell is founder, president and CEO of Juxtopia LLC, a Baltimore biomedical and information technology company founded in 2001 that specializes in human performance monitoring products and services.
SPORTS
By Jerry Crowe, Tribune Newspapers | March 3, 2011
PISMO BEACH, Calif. — Horace Grant is so enchanted by his adopted home on California's central coast that he might be mistaken for a realtor or tourism-council spokesman. "It's so serene," he says. "It's such a beautiful area. " At the moment, the former Lakers forward is seated in the living room of a rented hilltop home high above Pismo Beach. Out the window on a clear winter day, views of the jagged coastline are magnificent, stretching from San Luis Obispo Bay to the northwest, the shimmering Pacific Ocean dead ahead and, to the south, the Pismo Dunes Natural Preserve and beyond.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest, Special to The Sun | April 17, 2011
Recently called one of the "rock stars who make things happen" by the Economic Alliance of Greater Baltimore, city technology leader Jayfus Doswell is a modern-day Renaissance man. While his job focuses on developing cutting-edge technologies, Doswell also works to break ground for new businesses and research in Baltimore. On top of that, he is committed to helping young people from underprivileged backgrounds learn the skills that will allow them to succeed, too. Doswell is founder, president and CEO of Juxtopia LLC, a Baltimore biomedical and information technology company founded in 2001 that specializes in human performance monitoring products and services.
TRAVEL
By Chicago Tribune | March 1, 2009
Name: : SwiMP3 What it is: : A waterproof MP3 player that doesn't need earphones. The SwiMP3 rests on your cheeks while you swim, using bone-conduction technology to transmit music vibrations to your ear, so you hear music in fine detail. How it works: : Your goggles hold the SwiMP3 in place, as it plays about 60 tunes. While earphones vibrate air to turn digital files into sound, the SwiMP3 vibrates the fluid in your inner ear to transmit sound. The good: : Music on the SwiMP3 sounds deeper and richer than when listening through waterproof earphones to a regular MP3 player that's in a waterproof case.
NEWS
January 8, 2010
Aviation Specialties Unlimited Inc. will provide 12 days of night-vision-goggle training to the Baltimore County Police Department's Aviation Unit at a cost of $29,240. The contractor, based in Boise, Idaho, is the sole authorized dealer for the goggles and is considered an industry leader in sales, maintenance, training and cockpit modifications for advanced night vision technology. Its training programs have the approval of the Federal Aviation Administration. The company will provide eight hours of classroom instruction and five hours of flight time for the county unit's seven pilots and nine technical officers starting Wednesday and continuing through Jan. 25. The county department used a federal grant to purchase four pairs of night vision goggles in November at a cost of $10,600 each.
TRAVEL
By Chicago Tribune | March 1, 2009
Name: : SwiMP3 What it is: : A waterproof MP3 player that doesn't need earphones. The SwiMP3 rests on your cheeks while you swim, using bone-conduction technology to transmit music vibrations to your ear, so you hear music in fine detail. How it works: : Your goggles hold the SwiMP3 in place, as it plays about 60 tunes. While earphones vibrate air to turn digital files into sound, the SwiMP3 vibrates the fluid in your inner ear to transmit sound. The good: : Music on the SwiMP3 sounds deeper and richer than when listening through waterproof earphones to a regular MP3 player that's in a waterproof case.
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