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SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1999
On the desert sands of Dubai, under the watchful eye of Sheik Mohammed, the 3-year-olds of Godolphin Racing Inc. will compete this weekend in what Arab horsemen call a trial race.The horses' performances at Nad Al Sheba Racecourse in the United Arab Emirates will shed light -- although probably not much -- on Godolphin's Kentucky Derby plans for Worldly Manner and its seven other 3-year-olds nominated to the Triple Crown.Although the eight horses were also nominated to the Blue Grass Stakes at Keeneland -- on April 10, three weeks before the Kentucky Derby -- Godolphin spokesmen have said they're prepared to send horses from Dubai directly to the Derby without an official prep race.
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SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2002
Of the expected full field of 20 in the Kentucky Derby next Saturday at Churchill Downs, three of the horses will have traveled across the Atlantic - one from Dubai in the Middle East and two from Ireland. The one who has traveled the farthest will probably have the best chance. Essence of Dubai, a son of Pulpit purchased for $2.3 million as a yearling, has won both of his races this year at Nad Al Sheba Race Course in Dubai. Owned by Godolphin Racing, Essence of Dubai is the only Derby contender who has raced on dirt at 1 1/4 miles, the Derby distance.
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SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2001
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- The big horse in this year's Kentucky Derby is not Point Given, even though reporters continually describe the race favorite as colossal. No, the big horse in Saturday's race at Churchill Downs is Express Tour. The entrant of Godolphin Racing, the international stable based in the Middle East, measures 17.2 hands. Point Given measures 17 hands. Both horses weigh more than 1,200 pounds. (A hand equals 4 inches. Horses are measured from the ground to the withers, the highest point of the back.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2001
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- The big horse in this year's Kentucky Derby is not Point Given, even though reporters continually describe the race favorite as colossal. No, the big horse in Saturday's race at Churchill Downs is Express Tour. The entrant of Godolphin Racing, the international stable based in the Middle East, measures 17.2 hands. Point Given measures 17 hands. Both horses weigh more than 1,200 pounds. (A hand equals 4 inches. Horses are measured from the ground to the withers, the highest point of the back.
SPORTS
July 25, 1999
Daylami scored a runaway victory in the $1 million King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Diamond Stakes yesterday at Ascot in England. As the second leg of the inaugural World Series Racing Championship, the Group I stakes is one of the world's premier races.Daylami is trained by Saeed bin Suroor and owned by Godolphin Racing Inc., the international stable based in Dubai in the Middle East. That team also produced the runner-up, Nedawi. Frankie Dettori rode the winner, and Gary Stevens piloted Nedawi.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2002
Of the expected full field of 20 in the Kentucky Derby next Saturday at Churchill Downs, three of the horses will have traveled across the Atlantic - one from Dubai in the Middle East and two from Ireland. The one who has traveled the farthest will probably have the best chance. Essence of Dubai, a son of Pulpit purchased for $2.3 million as a yearling, has won both of his races this year at Nad Al Sheba Race Course in Dubai. Owned by Godolphin Racing, Essence of Dubai is the only Derby contender who has raced on dirt at 1 1/4 miles, the Derby distance.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2000
China Visit was a well-kept secret, apparently even to his owners, until last weekend, when he dominated the U.A.E. Derby at Nad Al Sheba Racecourse in Dubai in the Middle East. Now, the lightly raced 3-year-old son of Red Ransom is Godolphin Racing's top hope for a runner in the Kentucky Derby May 6 and, perhaps, in the Preakness two weeks later in Baltimore. In only his second race, China Visit romped by 4 1/2 lengths in the 1 1/8-mile U.A.E. Derby, a $500,000 stakes for 3-year-olds on the Dubai World Cup undercard.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2000
Standing in the winner's circle after the Private Terms Stakes, trainer Larry Murray said the one horse he wanted his Pickupspeed to avoid was Tim's Crossing. Murray called the undefeated Tim's Crossing one of the best, maybe even the best, 3-year-old in the country. Today, in the $200,000 Federico Tesio Stakes at Pimlico, the two promising Maryland-based horses will clash despite Murray's trepidation. He decided he had little choice except to run Pickupspeed, a gelded son of Broad Brush, against Tim's Crossing, a blazingly fast son of Valley Crossing.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1999
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- The first reaction was unprintable. By yesterday morning, however, Jinny Vance and Laddie Dance had mulled it over and decided that post position 20 wasn't so bad for their Lemon Drop Kid after all."You've got time to maneuver," Vance said."After a mile they'll be dropping like flies," added Dance."That last quarter's when you need to be clear," said Scotty Schulhofer, the colt's trainer."It isn't all bad, if you analyze it," concluded Dance.And so Lemon Drop Kid, the Kentucky Derby horse owned by Marylanders Vance and Dance, will break from the far-outside post, where only one Derby winner has broken before.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1999
LEXINGTON, Ky. -- The hammer fell ... $3 million ... $2.8 million ... $2.5 million. Twenty times the auctioneer's hammer fell at $1 million or more in the annual high-stakes, high-risk drama known as the Keeneland July Selected Yearling Sale.During nine intoxicating hours Monday and Tuesday in a swank pavilion here in the heart of horse country, a sheik, a prince and the wealthiest of sportsmen engaged in a spectacle of ego fulfillment, business investment and romantic adventure.In the process they established a world record for what might be sport's ultimate gamble: trying to pick a future Kentucky Derby winner from horses barely a year old, horses that have never run on a track or even experienced a human on their back.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2000
Standing in the winner's circle after the Private Terms Stakes, trainer Larry Murray said the one horse he wanted his Pickupspeed to avoid was Tim's Crossing. Murray called the undefeated Tim's Crossing one of the best, maybe even the best, 3-year-old in the country. Today, in the $200,000 Federico Tesio Stakes at Pimlico, the two promising Maryland-based horses will clash despite Murray's trepidation. He decided he had little choice except to run Pickupspeed, a gelded son of Broad Brush, against Tim's Crossing, a blazingly fast son of Valley Crossing.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2000
China Visit was a well-kept secret, apparently even to his owners, until last weekend, when he dominated the U.A.E. Derby at Nad Al Sheba Racecourse in Dubai in the Middle East. Now, the lightly raced 3-year-old son of Red Ransom is Godolphin Racing's top hope for a runner in the Kentucky Derby May 6 and, perhaps, in the Preakness two weeks later in Baltimore. In only his second race, China Visit romped by 4 1/2 lengths in the 1 1/8-mile U.A.E. Derby, a $500,000 stakes for 3-year-olds on the Dubai World Cup undercard.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1999
LEXINGTON, Ky. -- The hammer fell ... $3 million ... $2.8 million ... $2.5 million. Twenty times the auctioneer's hammer fell at $1 million or more in the annual high-stakes, high-risk drama known as the Keeneland July Selected Yearling Sale.During nine intoxicating hours Monday and Tuesday in a swank pavilion here in the heart of horse country, a sheik, a prince and the wealthiest of sportsmen engaged in a spectacle of ego fulfillment, business investment and romantic adventure.In the process they established a world record for what might be sport's ultimate gamble: trying to pick a future Kentucky Derby winner from horses barely a year old, horses that have never run on a track or even experienced a human on their back.
SPORTS
July 25, 1999
Daylami scored a runaway victory in the $1 million King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Diamond Stakes yesterday at Ascot in England. As the second leg of the inaugural World Series Racing Championship, the Group I stakes is one of the world's premier races.Daylami is trained by Saeed bin Suroor and owned by Godolphin Racing Inc., the international stable based in Dubai in the Middle East. That team also produced the runner-up, Nedawi. Frankie Dettori rode the winner, and Gary Stevens piloted Nedawi.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Tom Keyser and Kent Baker and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1999
Excellent Meeting, the third filly to run in the Preakness since 1939, did not complete the race. She got squished between horses early, and down the backstretch she quit running.Her trainer, Bob Baffert, said she may have displaced her palate, causing her difficulty breathing."We scoped her and she's OK," Baffert said, referring to a veterinarian's look into her lungs. "It may have happened when Kent [Desormeaux] had to check real hard as she went under the wire the first time."With Excellent Meeting dropping out before the finish, the last horse to pass under the wire was Worldly Manner, the horse from the Middle East.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1999
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- The first reaction was unprintable. By yesterday morning, however, Jinny Vance and Laddie Dance had mulled it over and decided that post position 20 wasn't so bad for their Lemon Drop Kid after all."You've got time to maneuver," Vance said."After a mile they'll be dropping like flies," added Dance."That last quarter's when you need to be clear," said Scotty Schulhofer, the colt's trainer."It isn't all bad, if you analyze it," concluded Dance.And so Lemon Drop Kid, the Kentucky Derby horse owned by Marylanders Vance and Dance, will break from the far-outside post, where only one Derby winner has broken before.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1999
On the front page of The Sun last Sunday, I had a story that said frustrations with Joe De Francis' 10-year stewardship of Pimlico and Laurel Park had become so pronounced that many believe Maryland might be better off if someone else operated the tracks or if the state built a track and let someone else run it.What do you think? Here are the issues raised in the article: Is De Francis correct in saying that slot machines at racetracks are the only way of ensuring long-term stability for the state's racing industry?
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1999
LEXINGTON, Ky. -- The phone call came July 31 last year, the morning after Prado's Landing won his first race at Laurel Park.Arnold Heft, the Chevy Chase resident who owned the colt, recalls the stranger from Kentucky offering $175,000 for the lightly raced 2-year-old. Heft thought that was mighty generous.The year before, he had bought Prado's Landing for a mere $25,000. And just a few months before the offer of $175,000, he had tried to sell the colt at auction but wound up buying him back because no one else thought he was worth more than $65,000.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1999
LEXINGTON, Ky. -- The phone call came July 31 last year, the morning after Prado's Landing won his first race at Laurel Park.Arnold Heft, the Chevy Chase resident who owned the colt, recalls the stranger from Kentucky offering $175,000 for the lightly raced 2-year-old. Heft thought that was mighty generous.The year before, he had bought Prado's Landing for a mere $25,000. And just a few months before the offer of $175,000, he had tried to sell the colt at auction but wound up buying him back because no one else thought he was worth more than $65,000.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1999
On the desert sands of Dubai, under the watchful eye of Sheik Mohammed, the 3-year-olds of Godolphin Racing Inc. will compete this weekend in what Arab horsemen call a trial race.The horses' performances at Nad Al Sheba Racecourse in the United Arab Emirates will shed light -- although probably not much -- on Godolphin's Kentucky Derby plans for Worldly Manner and its seven other 3-year-olds nominated to the Triple Crown.Although the eight horses were also nominated to the Blue Grass Stakes at Keeneland -- on April 10, three weeks before the Kentucky Derby -- Godolphin spokesmen have said they're prepared to send horses from Dubai directly to the Derby without an official prep race.
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