Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGoddard Space Flight Center
IN THE NEWS

Goddard Space Flight Center

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
— Christen McWithey is sitting in front of a 3-D printer the size of a microwave, figuring out how to turn computer graphics into model satellites and telescopes to support a NASA mission. Christen McWithey is 19 years old. McWithey, who just completed her freshman year at the University of Maryland, College Park, said she's "blown away" by the opportunities she's had as an intern at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. She's producing the models to help engineers and scientists visualize the creation of a satellite they're working to launch in eight years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Robert W. Halli Sr., a retired mechanical engineer who worked for NASA and earlier for the old Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River, died Sept. 8 at Stella Maris Hospice of heart failure. He was 100. The son of Florence Casper "Flo" Halli, a shipping clerk, and Gertrude M. Hildenbrand Halli, a homemaker, Robert William Halli Sr. was born and raised in Pittsburgh. After graduating first in his class at Central High School, he enrolled at what was then Carnegie Institute of Technology, where he graduated in 1936 with a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Robert W. Halli Sr., a retired mechanical engineer who worked for NASA and earlier for the old Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River, died Sept. 8 at Stella Maris Hospice of heart failure. He was 100. The son of Florence Casper "Flo" Halli, a shipping clerk, and Gertrude M. Hildenbrand Halli, a homemaker, Robert William Halli Sr. was born and raised in Pittsburgh. After graduating first in his class at Central High School, he enrolled at what was then Carnegie Institute of Technology, where he graduated in 1936 with a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
Northrop Grumman broke ground Monday on a 25,00-square-foot facility specializing in cargo bound for space, the latest expansion to Maryland's slowly growing space industry. The $20 million center near Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport will be used to create and test space payloads and will feature a three-story, 6,000-square-foot clean room, a climate-controlled, air-locked facility where sensitive equipment can be made free of contaminants. That clean room will be the largest on the company's 129-acre campus in Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and Blair Ames, Baltimore Sun Media Group | April 12, 2013
Sen. Ben Cardin lamented snowballing damage from federal budget cuts in town hall meetings with federal workers and small-business leaders Friday, pledging to work toward an alternative budget solution by October. But he acknowledged that achieving a compromise between similar budget proposals from the Senate and President Barack Obama and another from the House of Representatives could be a challenge. He spoke to two dozen Howard County business owners and more than 50 employees at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Joseph Decatur Barksdale, who went from the cotton fields of Mississippi where his family was sharecropping to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, where he oversaw the information technology department, died March 15 at his home in Laurel from complications from a fall. He was 79. "He loved poetry and he loved Shakespeare," said his daughter Maryn Rosenberg of Laurel. But he also loved to tell stories of growing up in the South, "chasing butterflies, learning to write his letters with a stick in the dirt, listening to his grandfather play the fiddle, or running barefoot in the cotton fields," she said.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
In a room with concrete block walls from which he can barely see the sky, Drake Deming explores the heavens. Several days a week he can be found in his office at the University of Maryland, College Park, surrounded by three computer screens, analyzing information about planets outside our solar system. In these remote regions - no closer than four light years - roughly 24 trillion miles - and as far as hundreds of light years away - scientists hope one day to find an Earth-like world capable of supporting life.
NEWS
Lionel Foster | February 7, 2013
After hearing where I'm from, many strangers have looked at me as if I'd said I was recently cured of leprosy. Their expressions speak volumes: "How he manages to smile, I will never know. I'm glad he's OK, but, God, I hope he's not contagious. " They hear about our crime and violence. David Simon is a genius, but I worry that some of his less reflective fans view Baltimore basically as a prime location for a blaxploitation/zombie crossover film. Others don't like our accent. We have been held in such low esteem that Hollywood thought it was OK to destroy part of the city with a nuclear bomb ("The Sum of All Fears," 2002)
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2011
Florence Tan says she'll have fingers and toes crossed when NASA's latest Mars mission blasts off as early as Saturday morning from Cape Canaveral in Florida. The 47-year-old electrical engineer from Montgomery County oversaw all the wiring of an instrument package on board that was designed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center here. In the years leading up to the launch, Tan has painstakingly checked and rechecked all 2,000 pieces of wire inside the microwave oven-sized box — enough to stretch more than a third of a mile if strung together.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
Northrop Grumman broke ground Monday on a 25,00-square-foot facility specializing in cargo bound for space, the latest expansion to Maryland's slowly growing space industry. The $20 million center near Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport will be used to create and test space payloads and will feature a three-story, 6,000-square-foot clean room, a climate-controlled, air-locked facility where sensitive equipment can be made free of contaminants. That clean room will be the largest on the company's 129-acre campus in Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
— Christen McWithey is sitting in front of a 3-D printer the size of a microwave, figuring out how to turn computer graphics into model satellites and telescopes to support a NASA mission. Christen McWithey is 19 years old. McWithey, who just completed her freshman year at the University of Maryland, College Park, said she's "blown away" by the opportunities she's had as an intern at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. She's producing the models to help engineers and scientists visualize the creation of a satellite they're working to launch in eight years.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Joseph Decatur Barksdale, who went from the cotton fields of Mississippi where his family was sharecropping to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, where he oversaw the information technology department, died March 15 at his home in Laurel from complications from a fall. He was 79. "He loved poetry and he loved Shakespeare," said his daughter Maryn Rosenberg of Laurel. But he also loved to tell stories of growing up in the South, "chasing butterflies, learning to write his letters with a stick in the dirt, listening to his grandfather play the fiddle, or running barefoot in the cotton fields," she said.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
In a room with concrete block walls from which he can barely see the sky, Drake Deming explores the heavens. Several days a week he can be found in his office at the University of Maryland, College Park, surrounded by three computer screens, analyzing information about planets outside our solar system. In these remote regions - no closer than four light years - roughly 24 trillion miles - and as far as hundreds of light years away - scientists hope one day to find an Earth-like world capable of supporting life.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and Blair Ames, Baltimore Sun Media Group | April 12, 2013
Sen. Ben Cardin lamented snowballing damage from federal budget cuts in town hall meetings with federal workers and small-business leaders Friday, pledging to work toward an alternative budget solution by October. But he acknowledged that achieving a compromise between similar budget proposals from the Senate and President Barack Obama and another from the House of Representatives could be a challenge. He spoke to two dozen Howard County business owners and more than 50 employees at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt.
NEWS
Lionel Foster | February 7, 2013
After hearing where I'm from, many strangers have looked at me as if I'd said I was recently cured of leprosy. Their expressions speak volumes: "How he manages to smile, I will never know. I'm glad he's OK, but, God, I hope he's not contagious. " They hear about our crime and violence. David Simon is a genius, but I worry that some of his less reflective fans view Baltimore basically as a prime location for a blaxploitation/zombie crossover film. Others don't like our accent. We have been held in such low esteem that Hollywood thought it was OK to destroy part of the city with a nuclear bomb ("The Sum of All Fears," 2002)
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2011
Florence Tan says she'll have fingers and toes crossed when NASA's latest Mars mission blasts off as early as Saturday morning from Cape Canaveral in Florida. The 47-year-old electrical engineer from Montgomery County oversaw all the wiring of an instrument package on board that was designed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center here. In the years leading up to the launch, Tan has painstakingly checked and rechecked all 2,000 pieces of wire inside the microwave oven-sized box — enough to stretch more than a third of a mile if strung together.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writer | December 4, 1993
GREENBELT -- When folks at the Goddard Space Flight Center talk, Hubble listens.And then the flying space telescope -- the size of a city bus with wings -- responds. It turns its myopic eye toward a speck of light in the galaxy and locks onto it. It snaps a picture of a storm swirling around Saturn. It waits until a spinning blue ball called Earth passes from its field of vision so it can peer into the heavens again.All of this and so much more has gone on 24 hours a day, 365 days a year for three years and counting, because the Hubble Space Telescope never sleeps.
NEWS
August 16, 2007
Jack Evans, a retired mechanical engineer and former Rockdale resident, died Friday of Parkinson's disease at a health care center in Rock Hill, S.C. He was 87. Mr. Evans was born and raised in Crumpler, W.Va. He earned a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from West Virginia University in 1946. After earning his master's degree in mechanical engineering from Purdue University in 1949, he went to work for Monroe Auto Equipment in Michigan. He came to Baltimore in the early 1950s when he took a job at Rheem Manufacturing Co. in Sparrows Point where water heaters were manufactured.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | September 14, 2008
GREENBELT - Astrophysicists like to dance. Who knew? Another thing you might have learned yesterday at the Goddard Space Flight Center was that if you zip yourself into a striped suit of a certain adhesive material you will stick to a wall made of Velcro. And if you do it once, you'll have to do it twice. "I just want to go on the Velcro again," said Maria Cummings, one of seven children in a Gaithersburg family, who was so excited by the prospect of reconnecting with the wall that she became momentarily confused as to whether she was 8 or 9. Her 6-year-old brother John - no question about his age - was more concerned with the cookies being doled out by members of the Goddard Dance Club, run by scientists and other brainy types who apparently like to shake a leg when they're not busy figuring out the trajectory of some billion-dollar spaceship hurtling toward the stars.
NEWS
August 16, 2007
Jack Evans, a retired mechanical engineer and former Rockdale resident, died Friday of Parkinson's disease at a health care center in Rock Hill, S.C. He was 87. Mr. Evans was born and raised in Crumpler, W.Va. He earned a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from West Virginia University in 1946. After earning his master's degree in mechanical engineering from Purdue University in 1949, he went to work for Monroe Auto Equipment in Michigan. He came to Baltimore in the early 1950s when he took a job at Rheem Manufacturing Co. in Sparrows Point where water heaters were manufactured.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.