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By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writer | December 4, 1993
GREENBELT -- When folks at the Goddard Space Flight Center talk, Hubble listens.And then the flying space telescope -- the size of a city bus with wings -- responds. It turns its myopic eye toward a speck of light in the galaxy and locks onto it. It snaps a picture of a storm swirling around Saturn. It waits until a spinning blue ball called Earth passes from its field of vision so it can peer into the heavens again.All of this and so much more has gone on 24 hours a day, 365 days a year for three years and counting, because the Hubble Space Telescope never sleeps.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 30, 2009
If there's a would-be astronaut or astronomer in your house (or even a "coulda-been"), they will find a lot to do today in downtown Baltimore as the Goddard Space Flight Center celebrates its 50th anniversary and five decades of space science in Maryland. Along with the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab, Goddard has assembled more than 100 free exhibits and activities for kids and adults at the Baltimore Convention Center, from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Visitors can meet NASA astronaut and Baltimore native Ricky Arnold, just back from a shuttle flight to the International Space Station; explore interactive exhibits on Earth science and planetary exploration, and speak with real space scientists and engineers about their careers.
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NEWS
February 7, 2007
Joseph E. Vitale, an electrical engineer who worked with cancer support groups, died of brain cancer Friday at his Gambrills home. He was 41. Mr. Vitale was born in Newark, N.J., and raised in Old Bridge, N.Y., and Brick, N.J. After graduating from high school in 1983, he earned a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, N.J., in 1987. He worked for Bendix Corp. in Towson from 1987 until 1991, when he took a similar position at MSI Inc. in Washington.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | April 24, 2009
NASA officials said Thursday that they will try to launch their mission to repair and upgrade the Hubble Space Telescope a day earlier than planned. The push to launch the shuttle Atlantis on May 11 instead of May 12 is driven by a desire to add a third day to the available launch window. Failure to launch by May 13 would delay the Hubble mission until May 27 because of competing demands on the Florida launch facilities, officials said. "I feel fairly confident we can make a May 11 launch date," said LeRoy Cain, deputy manager of NASA's shuttle program.
NEWS
August 16, 2007
Jack Evans, a retired mechanical engineer and former Rockdale resident, died Friday of Parkinson's disease at a health care center in Rock Hill, S.C. He was 87. Mr. Evans was born and raised in Crumpler, W.Va. He earned a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from West Virginia University in 1946. After earning his master's degree in mechanical engineering from Purdue University in 1949, he went to work for Monroe Auto Equipment in Michigan. He came to Baltimore in the early 1950s when he took a job at Rheem Manufacturing Co. in Sparrows Point where water heaters were manufactured.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun Reporter | April 25, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Better practice your royal wave. The queen is coming to Maryland. Britain's Queen Elizabeth II has added a stop at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt to the schedule for her state visit to America next month. The 81-year-old monarch and her husband, Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, 85, will spend about two hours at Goddard on May 8, the British embassy and the space center said yesterday. They will visit mission control and speak with astronauts on the International Space Station.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | September 14, 2008
GREENBELT - Astrophysicists like to dance. Who knew? Another thing you might have learned yesterday at the Goddard Space Flight Center was that if you zip yourself into a striped suit of a certain adhesive material you will stick to a wall made of Velcro. And if you do it once, you'll have to do it twice. "I just want to go on the Velcro again," said Maria Cummings, one of seven children in a Gaithersburg family, who was so excited by the prospect of reconnecting with the wall that she became momentarily confused as to whether she was 8 or 9. Her 6-year-old brother John - no question about his age - was more concerned with the cookies being doled out by members of the Goddard Dance Club, run by scientists and other brainy types who apparently like to shake a leg when they're not busy figuring out the trajectory of some billion-dollar spaceship hurtling toward the stars.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | April 6, 1997
Nearly 28 years after Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, and about 400 years before the voyages of the starship Enterprise, Tammy Vajo slid her adjustable maroon office chair up to the computer.She had just popped Abba Gold into a CD player. "Dancing Queen" bubbled along under the constant subterranean rush of microprocessor cooling fans. Vajo typed in bursts, like gusts of rain hitting a plastic roof. The readout to her left indicated 17: 17 Zulu Time. The satellite would be in range in a matter of moments.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1998
From new ways of detecting breast cancer to predicting when hurricanes will strike, the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt has developed technology in the name of space exploration that can also be put to use here on Earth.An $800,000 grant from Goddard to the Maryland Economic Development Corp. (MEDCO) will help existing and start-up companies in the Baltimore area access that technology and give them assistance in developing, manufacturing and marketing new uses for it.The grant will go to a MEDCO offshoot, the Emerging Technology Center, a business incubator now under construction in the old American Can Co. in Canton.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 20, 1995
Now it's "Whitewater: The Rerun."Goddard Space Flight Center was not closed, but they are going to have to use smaller satellites.That judge who condemned a woman-batterer to marry his victim is himself condemned to be tried by a jury of talk show hosts in perpetuity.Carroll County is running out of gun range space and its rural way of life is threatened. They didn't know what development meant?
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | October 31, 2008
NASA officials have again postponed the launch of the shuttle Atlantis on a final mission to repair and upgrade the Hubble Space Telescope. The delay, from February to at least May, means astronomers will have to wait three months more before two of Hubble's key scientific instruments can be used again. Engineers told Hubble managers they need more time to inspect and test the 18-year-old hardware that will replace a science data computer that failed on Sept. 27, and to train astronauts and build the tools they need to install it. "Our plan is to try to have it ready to ship to Kennedy [Space Center]
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | September 14, 2008
GREENBELT - Astrophysicists like to dance. Who knew? Another thing you might have learned yesterday at the Goddard Space Flight Center was that if you zip yourself into a striped suit of a certain adhesive material you will stick to a wall made of Velcro. And if you do it once, you'll have to do it twice. "I just want to go on the Velcro again," said Maria Cummings, one of seven children in a Gaithersburg family, who was so excited by the prospect of reconnecting with the wall that she became momentarily confused as to whether she was 8 or 9. Her 6-year-old brother John - no question about his age - was more concerned with the cookies being doled out by members of the Goddard Dance Club, run by scientists and other brainy types who apparently like to shake a leg when they're not busy figuring out the trajectory of some billion-dollar spaceship hurtling toward the stars.
NEWS
February 5, 2008
BUDGET IMPACTS IN MARYLAND Chesapeake Bay: Clean Water State Revolving Fund for the six states of the bay watershed would be reduced from $50.7 million to $40.9 million. Oyster-restoration funds would be cut from $4.27 million to $850,000. Chesapeake Bay Watershed Education and Training Program and Chesapeake Bay Environmental Restoration and Protection Program would be eliminated. Impact aid: There would be no increase in funding for local school districts for the children of military families, whose numbers are expected to increase in Maryland as Aberdeen Proving Ground, Fort Meade and other bases expand.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | October 7, 2007
America is headed for the moon again, and Maryland scientists will be in the vanguard of the effort. NASA has chosen research teams from the University of Maryland, College Park and the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt to work on ideas for upgrading instruments that Apollo crews left behind in the lunar dust. Two other scientific proposals from area institutions - a small radio telescope array from the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, and a Goddard instrument to measure X-rays were also selected.
NEWS
August 16, 2007
Jack Evans, a retired mechanical engineer and former Rockdale resident, died Friday of Parkinson's disease at a health care center in Rock Hill, S.C. He was 87. Mr. Evans was born and raised in Crumpler, W.Va. He earned a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from West Virginia University in 1946. After earning his master's degree in mechanical engineering from Purdue University in 1949, he went to work for Monroe Auto Equipment in Michigan. He came to Baltimore in the early 1950s when he took a job at Rheem Manufacturing Co. in Sparrows Point where water heaters were manufactured.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | July 7, 2007
John Wagener in Pikesville asks, "How far away from a candle would I have to hold my hand to equal the heat that the Earth gets from the sun?" Huh? You'd need a bazillion candles to match the heat the sun pours onto the Earth. But let's say you're asking for heat per square inch. My experts at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center say you have to get very close to feel any heat beside a candle flame. Their best answer to your query: a tenth of an inch.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1991
This is a weekly summary of selected prime contracts recently awarded by the federal government to companies and other vendors in Maryland.Maryland contractsMetraplex Corp. in Frederick won a $783,456 contract from the Navy to provide instruments and laboratory equipment.Ryon Inc. in Forestville won a $181,200 contract from the Navy to provide miscellaneous pavement repairs.Maxima Corp. in Lanham won a $1,377,750 contract from the Department of Labor to provide public disclosure support services.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | July 7, 2007
John Wagener in Pikesville asks, "How far away from a candle would I have to hold my hand to equal the heat that the Earth gets from the sun?" Huh? You'd need a bazillion candles to match the heat the sun pours onto the Earth. But let's say you're asking for heat per square inch. My experts at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center say you have to get very close to feel any heat beside a candle flame. Their best answer to your query: a tenth of an inch.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun Reporter | April 25, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Better practice your royal wave. The queen is coming to Maryland. Britain's Queen Elizabeth II has added a stop at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt to the schedule for her state visit to America next month. The 81-year-old monarch and her husband, Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, 85, will spend about two hours at Goddard on May 8, the British embassy and the space center said yesterday. They will visit mission control and speak with astronauts on the International Space Station.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Reporter | March 4, 2007
Imagine a window with 62,000 shutters - each the width of a human hair. That's what scientists at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center are building to capture light from the most distant stars ever seen - in the most complex stargazer they have ever constructed. They say their contribution to the $4.5 billion James Webb Space Telescope will help answer lingering questions about the dawn of the universe, the fate of the earliest stars and the formation of the planets. "Nothing like this has ever been put in space before," said Murzy Jhabvala, chief engineer of Goddard's Instrument Technology Center in Greenbelt.
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