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NEWS
October 3, 1990
Persian Gulf duty is not'just a jobRussell Baker's pen misfired in his Sept. 24 column. Despite the elegance of his prose, he missed the essence of what always has been the strength of America's fighting men and women: a dedication to principle that transcends dollars and cents and fringe benefits; ideals that are clearly worth the family separations and sacrifices even when it means serving in the deserts of the Middle East, the barren plateaus of Korea...
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NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 5, 2009
So I did the cash-for-clunkers deal, and I am a happy citizen today. I have a new car that gets twice the mileage of the 10-year-old minivan that I hadn't been driving much anymore anyway - it had failed a Maryland emissions test and needed a costly repair - and I don't even feel that guilty about taking the government's money. I mean, if the guys at AIG didn't, why should I? I got $4,500 for a worthless vehicle with 212,308 miles on it, a bad cough, a rip in the tacky steering wheel pad and tires that looked like Nick Markakis' head.
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NEWS
By MILES CHRISTIAN DANIELS | December 15, 2005
In case you've been hunkered down on Mount Kenya, Brokeback Mountain opened last weekend. No hurricanes destroyed Orlando. No meteorites were reported in Los Angeles. In fact, the film quietly attracted huge crowds in New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco and will premiere in other markets this weekend. And so it seems Ang Lee's film about two cowboys in love is - at minimum - surviving. Why is a question we'll have to figure out later. Could be that all three opening cities have hefty gay populations.
NEWS
By Uri Dromi | June 14, 2007
An open letter to a Hamas supporter in Gaza: So, over the last 40 years, Israelis have been told constantly by the world to pull out of Gaza and the West Bank. Two years ago, we did evacuate Gaza, but what did we get in return? A barrage of deadly missiles on our south and a Palestinian government led by the Hamas people you had elected - people who openly advocate the destruction of Israel. You have been busy the past few days, but when you finish leveling the homes of your rivals, when you finish killing off their leaders, when you have reasserted your prominence in the Gaza Strip, here is my prediction: You will most probably continue to launch those primitive Qassam missiles on our southern town of Sderot.
NEWS
October 14, 2001
MANY Marylanders rushed to New York City Sept. 11 and after, to help. They were firefighters, paramedics, rescue workers, police officers, physicians, nurses and others whose special skills were needed. Volunteers all. They were helping not only the victims of the atrocity and the overworked first rescue workers, but also their neighbors in Maryland, knitting it into the nationwide fabric of concern that next time may help - God forbid - Marylanders in need. Mentioned here, as a stand-in for them all, is Tim Kane, a senior at Salisbury University on the Eastern Shore.
NEWS
February 10, 1994
Under the new Russian constitution adopted by referendum on Dec. 12, citizens may not be prosecuted under secret laws and regulations. Yet at this very moment a Russian court adhering to Stalinist ways is conducting a closed trial in which a defendant is accused of violating secret regulations he has never seen. Moreover, the three judges determining his fate have said they have no need to see the regulations either. They imply a willingness to accept the prosecution's word that the regulations exist and they have been violated by the defendant.
FEATURES
By Julia Gorin and Julia Gorin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 1, 1998
As video shelves around the country make room for boxes and boxes of "Titanic" this week, two things are certain: One, it will do well; two, it will do well with the same people it did well with at the box office.In other words, the only people renting the 2 1/2 -hour epic will be the same people who've seen it already. That's because anyone who hasn't seen it by now is a Titanic Holdout -- someone who is purposely avoiding it on principle.There are a few categories of Titanic Holdouts: those people who prefer not to help the living capitalize off an international tragedy; those who don't like a story in which the majority of the characters' fates end in death; and those for whom the persistent sight of Leonardo DiCaprio would ruin any real moment the picture had to offer.
NEWS
By Uri Dromi | June 14, 2007
An open letter to a Hamas supporter in Gaza: So, over the last 40 years, Israelis have been told constantly by the world to pull out of Gaza and the West Bank. Two years ago, we did evacuate Gaza, but what did we get in return? A barrage of deadly missiles on our south and a Palestinian government led by the Hamas people you had elected - people who openly advocate the destruction of Israel. You have been busy the past few days, but when you finish leveling the homes of your rivals, when you finish killing off their leaders, when you have reasserted your prominence in the Gaza Strip, here is my prediction: You will most probably continue to launch those primitive Qassam missiles on our southern town of Sderot.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2005
Alan Meadoff knew two years ago when he was diagnosed with prostate cancer how he wanted to go in the end. No feeding tube. No life support. No assisted-living facility or nursing home. The retired furniture designer in Jamestown, N.C., wrote it all down in a living will. The document gave him peace of mind - until the legal battle over brain-damaged Terri Schiavo grew more heated and Meadoff began worrying that his instructions weren't specific enough. He designated two new proxies to represent him and spelled out that no one - not friends, not doctors, not the government - was to interfere with his wishes.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 5, 2009
So I did the cash-for-clunkers deal, and I am a happy citizen today. I have a new car that gets twice the mileage of the 10-year-old minivan that I hadn't been driving much anymore anyway - it had failed a Maryland emissions test and needed a costly repair - and I don't even feel that guilty about taking the government's money. I mean, if the guys at AIG didn't, why should I? I got $4,500 for a worthless vehicle with 212,308 miles on it, a bad cough, a rip in the tacky steering wheel pad and tires that looked like Nick Markakis' head.
NEWS
By MILES CHRISTIAN DANIELS | December 15, 2005
In case you've been hunkered down on Mount Kenya, Brokeback Mountain opened last weekend. No hurricanes destroyed Orlando. No meteorites were reported in Los Angeles. In fact, the film quietly attracted huge crowds in New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco and will premiere in other markets this weekend. And so it seems Ang Lee's film about two cowboys in love is - at minimum - surviving. Why is a question we'll have to figure out later. Could be that all three opening cities have hefty gay populations.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2005
A line of folks stood sipping lattes outside a Fells Point coffee shop yesterday afternoon. They would have sat, but -- alas -- by city decree, the Daily Grind has no right to outdoor chairs. This is news to the hundreds of customers who have taken their coffee along with a waterfront view for years at the Thames Street coffeehouse's outdoor tables. The Daily Grind found out this month that although it had permits for outdoor seating, the city issued them in error. So when neighbors complained this month about noise, the city said the tables and chairs had to go. Daily Grind owner David Key taped signs in his shop's front window apologizing for the vanished seats and urging upset customers to come inside and sign a petition.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2005
Alan Meadoff knew two years ago when he was diagnosed with prostate cancer how he wanted to go in the end. No feeding tube. No life support. No assisted-living facility or nursing home. The retired furniture designer in Jamestown, N.C., wrote it all down in a living will. The document gave him peace of mind - until the legal battle over brain-damaged Terri Schiavo grew more heated and Meadoff began worrying that his instructions weren't specific enough. He designated two new proxies to represent him and spelled out that no one - not friends, not doctors, not the government - was to interfere with his wishes.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | January 19, 2005
ARLINGTON, Va. -- Probably more vigilance and money are being devoted to protecting tomorrow's inauguration of President Bush from terrorists than have been dedicated to any public event on U.S. soil in history. But what if it isn't enough? Suppose -- God forbid -- an Islamic terror cell buried deep within this country for years has been given the code it has been waiting for to conduct the most public assassination of American public officials. No one will be able to claim we weren't warned, or defend against the charge that we deluded ourselves with political correctness, inattention and bureaucratic rivalries.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2004
As pressure builds for governments to import medicine from Canada or take other measures to cut spending on prescriptions, Maryland is saving millions of dollars more than anticipated through an initiative to win rebates on drugs purchased domestically. Although the state initially estimated it would save $20 million a year by developing a "preferred-drug list" for Medicaid patients, the program has been so successful that it expects to save $31 million, said Nelson J. Sabatini, who retires today as state health secretary.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight-Ridder / Tribune | July 11, 2004
PETS ARE GOOD, because they teach children important lessons about life, the main one being that, sooner or later, life kicks the bucket. With me, it was sooner. When I was a boy, my dad, who worked in New York City, would periodically bring home a turtle in a little plastic tank that had a little plastic island with a little plastic palm tree, as is so often found in natural turtle habitats. I was excited about having a pet, and I'd give the turtle a fun pet name like Scooter. But my excitement was not shared by Scooter, who, despite residing in a tropical paradise, never did anything except mope around.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | January 19, 2005
ARLINGTON, Va. -- Probably more vigilance and money are being devoted to protecting tomorrow's inauguration of President Bush from terrorists than have been dedicated to any public event on U.S. soil in history. But what if it isn't enough? Suppose -- God forbid -- an Islamic terror cell buried deep within this country for years has been given the code it has been waiting for to conduct the most public assassination of American public officials. No one will be able to claim we weren't warned, or defend against the charge that we deluded ourselves with political correctness, inattention and bureaucratic rivalries.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | November 29, 1991
THIS IS THE START of the holiday party season, that frightening time of year when many of us are forced to sip watery eggnog and mingle in stuffy wood-paneled basements adorned with velvet Elvis paintings while a scratchy rendition of "Jingle Bell Rock" plays maddeningly in the background.Sadly, in this era of the New Sobriety, holiday parties tend to be fairly tame affairs.Gone are the wonderful parties where drunks reeled about spouting gibberish, your tipsy neighbor would brush against the chafing dish and set her dress on fire, and at least one couple feverishly groped under the coats in the upstairs bedroom.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | November 2, 2003
NOW THEY want to ruin the Maryland State Fairgrounds with thousands of slot machines. The worst part is, they want to scrap the annual events -- your bass show, your recreational-type vehicle show, your model-train show, your gem-and-jewelry show -- and go with a year-round, smoke-filled hall of degenerate gamblers who will sit on stools in stretch pants, slip coins into slot machines all day, then panhandle for change on York Road. Good morning, Timonium! "I think that the community and Baltimore County can benefit from having a [slots]
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2003
WASHINGTON - If - God forbid - the New Christy Minstrel Singers, the chirpiest of all '60s folk acts, ever decide to go on tour again, imagine the size of the crowds that would clamor to stay away. Yet their doubles, the New Main Street Singers, luminous in their signature yellow and blue outfits, were greeted the other night at Washington's sold-out 9:30 Club with squeals of delight and affection reserved only for the most beloved musical reunions. This was a reunion. Not only were the New Main Street Singers back together but so too were the ever earnest Folksmen and those folkie sweethearts, Mitch and Mickey, who once again smooched before an adoring crowd at the conclusion of "A Kiss At the End of the Rainbow," their paean to their own legendary romance.
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