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By Rebecca Howard and Rebecca Howard,Los Angeles Daily News | August 27, 1992
Facial hair is a catalyst to male metamorphosis. And the latest metamorphosis -- the goatee -- is a throwback to the 1950s, when beatniks, those artsy and devilish-looking cats were the intellectual rebels.Today the goatee is more a fashion statement than an act of rebellion, although a rebellion against shaving may be one motivator. The short, neat, mustache paired with a chin-only beard has been spotted on the likes of Bruce Willis, Adam Rich, Paul Reubens, Mickey Rourke, Rob Lowe and members of the bands the Smithereens and Los Lobos.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | July 19, 2011
Is it just me, or is Paul Schurick looking a lot cooler now that he's on the hot seat? The longtime aide to former Governors Bob Ehrlich and William Donald Schaefer always came off as a buttoned-down bureaucrat to me. Until I saw him in April at Schaefer's funeral. He said hello outside the church and for a moment, I didn't recognize him. This is a guy I've lunched with a several times. He's someone I know well enough to have swapped recipes with him. (Schurick may prove to be a political dirty trickster, but he's also a foodie.
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FEATURES
By John Marshall and John Marshall,Seattle Post-Intelligencer | August 16, 1994
Suddenly, they're everywhere -- on rock stars on MTV, on baseball stars on ESPN, on film stars on talk shows, and even on real men in real life. This has become, believe it or not, the Summer of the Goatee, perhaps the high-water mark of goatee popularity in all of goatee history.That outlaw form of facial hair is growing out on male faces all over America.For centuries, these weird beardlets have been favored by those on the societal fringe -- poets, revolutionaries, jazzmen, beatniks, fencers and folksingers (Peter, Paul minus Mary)
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2005
The man in the leather jacket slipped in and out of the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse in Baltimore last week, sometimes to have a cigar, sometimes to get air. He had come to testify in the sexual child abuse trial of Maurice Blackwell, the defrocked priest from West Baltimore's St. Edward Roman Catholic Church. The victim in the case was Dontee Stokes, who shot Blackwell three years ago. But Robert A. Martin, a 50-year-old Louisiana resident, wanted the jury to hear his story, too. Martin says he was a confused teenager from an unstable home when Blackwell took him under his wing in the late 1960s and throughout the 1970s.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1995
Is it over yet? Just wondering. Eventually this goatee thing will blow over and we can all go back to leading normal lives.For now we'll tolerate this annoying sensation that we've stumbled into an Old Dutch painting. Or another remake of "The Three Musketeers." Or the Seattle Mariners' locker room.Somebody thought this was a good idea. Somebody in California, naturally. The names are familiar enough: Ethan Hawke, Brad Pitt, Bruce Willis, Tom Cruise. Six years ago the reappearance of the goatee was heralded in the Los Angeles Times.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | December 18, 1997
To: S. ClausFrom: William Morris AgencyRe: Updating your imageDEAR MR. CLAUS,After an exhaustive personal and professional evaluation, as per your request, we've identified seven key areas, or "core growth elements" to work on:Jazz up that wardrobe!To William Morris, heavy red flannel says "Ho-hum," not "Ho-ho-ho!" And fur is out, out, out! Eighty-seven-year-old society matrons in Manhattan can get away with it; an international toy magnate can't.The buzzword in fashion today: active-wear -- breathable, lightweight fabrics for people on the go.Our suggestions:For that hectic sleigh ride on the evening of 12/24: weatherproof Goretex shell, St. John's Bay nylon wind pants, Nike Max Triax running shoes for improved rooftop stability.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2005
The man in the leather jacket slipped in and out of the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse in Baltimore last week, sometimes to have a cigar, sometimes to get air. He had come to testify in the sexual child abuse trial of Maurice Blackwell, the defrocked priest from West Baltimore's St. Edward Roman Catholic Church. The victim in the case was Dontee Stokes, who shot Blackwell three years ago. But Robert A. Martin, a 50-year-old Louisiana resident, wanted the jury to hear his story, too. Martin says he was a confused teenager from an unstable home when Blackwell took him under his wing in the late 1960s and throughout the 1970s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | November 12, 2000
The final performance of Everyman Theatre's "The Road to Mecca" is sold out -- standing room only. Audience members are perched behind the last row of seats. Among them, wearing a loose gray shirt, black trousers and a neatly trimmed goatee, is an affable-looking man of ample build. Engrossed in every word and gesture on stage, he has the contented mien of a proud uncle. He couldn't be happier that a full house has kept him from a seat. After all, this is his theater. When the performance ends to hearty applause, Vincent Lancisi -- the man with the goatee -- heads backstage, following the strings of small white Christmas tree lights that allow actors to navigate the darkened wings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | July 19, 2011
Is it just me, or is Paul Schurick looking a lot cooler now that he's on the hot seat? The longtime aide to former Governors Bob Ehrlich and William Donald Schaefer always came off as a buttoned-down bureaucrat to me. Until I saw him in April at Schaefer's funeral. He said hello outside the church and for a moment, I didn't recognize him. This is a guy I've lunched with a several times. He's someone I know well enough to have swapped recipes with him. (Schurick may prove to be a political dirty trickster, but he's also a foodie.
NEWS
By Rene A. Guzman and Rene A. Guzman,New York Times News Service | November 2, 2003
Blame Queer Eye for the Straight Guy and the media obsession with metrosexuals for the average man's lack of style sense. Truth is, the fashion finger-pointing starts with the man in the mirror. But we're all in the same style-starved boat here. So rather another must-have laundry list, let's learn what NOT to wear. "Most men can grasp onto, 'Don't do this,' " says Kenneth Karpinski, author of Mistakes Men Make That Women Hate: 101 Style Tips for Men (Capital Books, $9.95). "If they recognize those don'ts and make that change, then they will have done an incremental improvement of how they look immediately.
NEWS
By Rene A. Guzman and Rene A. Guzman,New York Times News Service | November 2, 2003
Blame Queer Eye for the Straight Guy and the media obsession with metrosexuals for the average man's lack of style sense. Truth is, the fashion finger-pointing starts with the man in the mirror. But we're all in the same style-starved boat here. So rather another must-have laundry list, let's learn what NOT to wear. "Most men can grasp onto, 'Don't do this,' " says Kenneth Karpinski, author of Mistakes Men Make That Women Hate: 101 Style Tips for Men (Capital Books, $9.95). "If they recognize those don'ts and make that change, then they will have done an incremental improvement of how they look immediately.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | November 12, 2000
The final performance of Everyman Theatre's "The Road to Mecca" is sold out -- standing room only. Audience members are perched behind the last row of seats. Among them, wearing a loose gray shirt, black trousers and a neatly trimmed goatee, is an affable-looking man of ample build. Engrossed in every word and gesture on stage, he has the contented mien of a proud uncle. He couldn't be happier that a full house has kept him from a seat. After all, this is his theater. When the performance ends to hearty applause, Vincent Lancisi -- the man with the goatee -- heads backstage, following the strings of small white Christmas tree lights that allow actors to navigate the darkened wings.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | December 18, 1997
To: S. ClausFrom: William Morris AgencyRe: Updating your imageDEAR MR. CLAUS,After an exhaustive personal and professional evaluation, as per your request, we've identified seven key areas, or "core growth elements" to work on:Jazz up that wardrobe!To William Morris, heavy red flannel says "Ho-hum," not "Ho-ho-ho!" And fur is out, out, out! Eighty-seven-year-old society matrons in Manhattan can get away with it; an international toy magnate can't.The buzzword in fashion today: active-wear -- breathable, lightweight fabrics for people on the go.Our suggestions:For that hectic sleigh ride on the evening of 12/24: weatherproof Goretex shell, St. John's Bay nylon wind pants, Nike Max Triax running shoes for improved rooftop stability.
NEWS
By Michael Gray | December 7, 1997
To: Mike Adams, Perspective editorFrom: Michael Gray, ""Hot Single"Re: Interview proposalDear Mike:As you no doubt have heard by now, I've been named one of Baltimore's ""50 hottest singles" by Baltimore magazine. Clearly the magazine's research was not terribly exhaustive, but who am I to argue?Anyway, I guess this means that for the next 15 minutes or so, I am a celebrity of sorts. And as you know, there is nothing readers hunger for more these days than interviews with celebrities. So I thought I'd offer you an exclusive interview with me on what it's like being so hot and so single.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1995
Is it over yet? Just wondering. Eventually this goatee thing will blow over and we can all go back to leading normal lives.For now we'll tolerate this annoying sensation that we've stumbled into an Old Dutch painting. Or another remake of "The Three Musketeers." Or the Seattle Mariners' locker room.Somebody thought this was a good idea. Somebody in California, naturally. The names are familiar enough: Ethan Hawke, Brad Pitt, Bruce Willis, Tom Cruise. Six years ago the reappearance of the goatee was heralded in the Los Angeles Times.
FEATURES
By John Marshall and John Marshall,Seattle Post-Intelligencer | August 16, 1994
Suddenly, they're everywhere -- on rock stars on MTV, on baseball stars on ESPN, on film stars on talk shows, and even on real men in real life. This has become, believe it or not, the Summer of the Goatee, perhaps the high-water mark of goatee popularity in all of goatee history.That outlaw form of facial hair is growing out on male faces all over America.For centuries, these weird beardlets have been favored by those on the societal fringe -- poets, revolutionaries, jazzmen, beatniks, fencers and folksingers (Peter, Paul minus Mary)
NEWS
By Michael Gray | December 7, 1997
To: Mike Adams, Perspective editorFrom: Michael Gray, ""Hot Single"Re: Interview proposalDear Mike:As you no doubt have heard by now, I've been named one of Baltimore's ""50 hottest singles" by Baltimore magazine. Clearly the magazine's research was not terribly exhaustive, but who am I to argue?Anyway, I guess this means that for the next 15 minutes or so, I am a celebrity of sorts. And as you know, there is nothing readers hunger for more these days than interviews with celebrities. So I thought I'd offer you an exclusive interview with me on what it's like being so hot and so single.
FEATURES
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1998
With the Cold War warmed, the Soviet Union dismantled and KGB agents out of vogue (and out of jobs), moviemakers have replaced Russia -- and Nazis and mobsters, too -- with a more modern genre of big-screen evil: the techno-spy.And in its search for new varieties of wiretapping, computer-hacking bad guys, Hollywood has aimed its cameras at the National Security Agency, the nation's super-secret eavesdropping and code-breaking organization at Fort Meade.It began five years ago with the movie "Sneakers," in which Robert Redford's crew of computer hackers steals a code-cracking device that can break into any computer on Earth.
FEATURES
By Rebecca Howard and Rebecca Howard,Los Angeles Daily News | August 27, 1992
Facial hair is a catalyst to male metamorphosis. And the latest metamorphosis -- the goatee -- is a throwback to the 1950s, when beatniks, those artsy and devilish-looking cats were the intellectual rebels.Today the goatee is more a fashion statement than an act of rebellion, although a rebellion against shaving may be one motivator. The short, neat, mustache paired with a chin-only beard has been spotted on the likes of Bruce Willis, Adam Rich, Paul Reubens, Mickey Rourke, Rob Lowe and members of the bands the Smithereens and Los Lobos.
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