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By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 19, 1990
Gross National Product, a political satire troupe out of Washington, has been making overtures north lately. The 10-year-old company played three test Sundays here last July, and now has settled in for what it hopes will be a regular gig at Slapstix Comedy Club.Despite the show's title, "BushCapades, An Administration on Thin Ice," GNP is performing at least as much improvisation and general-interest material as political humor.Perhaps GNP felt that Baltimoreans aren't as politically astute as our neighbors in the nation's capital.
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NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | November 8, 1993
Paris. -- Perhaps the most significant change in America's outlook on the world in recent years is the shift of attention from Europe to Asia. So long as the Soviet Union seemed strong, Europe was where Americans saw their strategic challenge.Today the focus is on economics. Japan now is the principal supposed threat to American interests. There is at the same time assumption that China will eventually rival Japan as the great power of Asia, and that China will be easier to deal with, more malleable, even friendlier, than Japan.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | November 28, 1990
Economists watch for the start of a recession much the way Baltimoreans watch for the start of a snow storm.They pass around hot rumors, debate contradictory reports and watch for the first signs things might be slipping out there on Main Street.Today, for example, the nation's economists were busy analyzing the latest revision of the Commerce Department's report on the gross national product during the third quarter of 1990. It showed that the U.S. economy was still growing in July, August and September, at an annual rate of 1.7 percent, indicating weak economic growth.
NEWS
By Felicia Lamport | November 27, 1991
Tell Bush not the mournful figure-! Of our grave financial slump:He is into something bigger3' That he's sure will prime the pump."Buy yourself a house and car, man!"* He exclaims with bonhomie,"Follow me and Richard Darman:' We'll save the economy."Though you suffer unemployment,, That's a thing to disregard.Live your life with full enjoyment;.` Charge it to your credit card."As to paying back the money,5) There's no hurry; don't feel pressed.Bankers grow extremely sunny( Totting up the interest."
BUSINESS
By Stephen E. Nordlinger and Stephen E. Nordlinger,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 26, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The nation's economy shrank sharply in the final three months of 1990, apparently ending nearly eight years of almost steady growth.Reflecting a steep drop in consumer spending in the midst of the Persian Gulf crisis, the gross national product, the broadest measure of economic activity, declined at an annual rate of 2.1 percent in the October-to-December quarter, the Commerce Department reported yesterday.Administration and private economists forecast a further economic decline in the early months of this year.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 31, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The government reported yesterday an increase in the gross national product that was hailed by the Bush administration but labeled by some economists as misleading or even masking an economy in recession.The Commerce Department said the economy grew at a 1.8 percent annual rate during the July-September quarter, faster than most analysts had expected and well above the expansion rate of 0.4 percent posted during the spring.With midterm elections a week away, the report was seized on by the Bush administration as evidence that the economy has not tipped into a recession.
NEWS
By Robert D. Hershey Jr. and Robert D. Hershey Jr.,New York Times News Service | April 27, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The economy contracted more rapidly in the first three months of the year than it did at the end of 1990, as national output recorded its first consecutive quarters of decline since the recession of 1981-82, the Commerce Department reported yesterday.Most analysts had come to expect in recent weeks that the decline would exceed the fourth quarter's 1.6 percent annual pace, and yesterday's report, which showed a 2.8 percent rate of decline in the January-March period, was not seen as significantly worsening prospects for pulling out of recession.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | February 28, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In a report that tended to support the idea that the recession will be relatively short and shallow, the Commerce Department revised yesterday its estimate of economic activity in the final quarter of 1990, showing that the gross national product fell at an annual rate of 2 percent.This was only slightly less than the estimate last month of a 2.1 percent decline for the October-December period, but economists said that shifts among the various GNP components were mostly heartening.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | August 29, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A government report that the nation's economy contracted rather than expanded during the second quarter of this year has cast a pall on the widely held view that the recession ended last spring.In a revised report, the Department of Commerce estimated yesterday that the gross national product, the total amount of goods and services produced by the economy, fell at an annual rate of 0.1 percent from April through June rather than rising at a 0.4 percent rate as reported a month ago.The department said that the second-quarter dip was primarily attributable to a sharper-than-expected decline in business inventories and weaker consumer spending than had been estimated initially.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau of The Sun | October 1, 1991
NEW YORK -- Depressed about the wave of negative economic statistics underscoring the recent recession? Look again. They might be getting better.A broad revision of history will emerge next month when the Commerce Department officially shifts its method for calculating gross national product -- the core statistic used by most people to suggest the direction of the economy. Under the new methodology, the economy suffered a wallop last Christmas and has since been on an upswing. GNP for the second quarter, officially reported as a 0.5 percent decline last week, actually rose 0.4 per cent under the soon-to-be official statistics (unless it is revised yet again)
BUSINESS
By PHILIP MOELLER and PHILIP MOELLER,SUN BUSINESS EDITOR | October 16, 1991
Sobering up isn't easy, and that's what our economy is doing these days.The cause of our queasiness in this analogy is the cessation of easy credit, which in economic terms has been a far more potent drug than alcohol. Real estate and other sectors that were really hooked on debt are clearly suffering the worst hangovers.The process is painful, but the notion that we can make it easier by taking a little nip of easier credit -- as in the hair of the dog that bit you -- only makes sense if we plan to hit the bottle heavily again.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau of The Sun | October 1, 1991
NEW YORK -- Depressed about the wave of negative economic statistics underscoring the recent recession? Look again. They might be getting better.A broad revision of history will emerge next month when the Commerce Department officially shifts its method for calculating gross national product -- the core statistic used by most people to suggest the direction of the economy. Under the new methodology, the economy suffered a wallop last Christmas and has since been on an upswing. GNP for the second quarter, officially reported as a 0.5 percent decline last week, actually rose 0.4 per cent under the soon-to-be official statistics (unless it is revised yet again)
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | August 29, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A government report that the nation's economy contracted rather than expanded during the second quarter of this year has cast a pall on the widely held view that the recession ended last spring.In a revised report, the Department of Commerce estimated yesterday that the gross national product, the total amount of goods and services produced by the economy, fell at an annual rate of 0.1 percent from April through June rather than rising at a 0.4 percent rate as reported a month ago.The department said that the second-quarter dip was primarily attributable to a sharper-than-expected decline in business inventories and weaker consumer spending than had been estimated initially.
NEWS
By Kathleen Beeman and Kathleen Beeman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 27, 1991
WASHINGTON -- America began recovering from the recession during the past three months, but the gross national product rose at a mere 0.4 percent annual rate, the Commerce Department reported yesterday, setting off a new debate over the nation's economic health.While the Bush administration greeted the news as a clear indication of economic recovery, some observers were less optimistic.After two consecutive quarters of decline of the gross national product, the April-to-June quarter's 0.4 percent increase showed a significant expansion of the GNP, which is the total production of goods and services, the Commerce Department said.
NEWS
By EVERETT CARLL LADD | July 2, 1991
Alexis de Tocqueville remarked often in his ''Democracy inAmerica'' on the vigor and energy of the nation's public life outside the sphere of government. He saw that the Americans of the 1830s differed sharply from Europeans in the way they were committed both to a large polity -- an expansive sphere of public engagement and action -- and a small state.Today, of course, the historic American ideal of limited government is being treated rather rudely. For all the talk of Reagan-era cutbacks, the scope of government is expanding steadily.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 27, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. economy contracted in the first quarter at a revised seasonally adjusted annual rate of 2.8 percent, a larger decline than was last reported, the Commerce Department said yesterday.The downward revision comes just as analysts and government officials see signs of an economic recovery at hand.The department said that a downward revision in personal spending and larger-than-previously reported inventory cuts accounted for its new tabulation of U.S. growth.Economists expect an increased consumer appetite and a restocking of business inventories to be two key contributors to an economic turnaround in the coming months.
NEWS
By Kathleen Beeman and Kathleen Beeman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 27, 1991
WASHINGTON -- America began recovering from the recession during the past three months, but the gross national product rose at a mere 0.4 percent annual rate, the Commerce Department reported yesterday, setting off a new debate over the nation's economic health.While the Bush administration greeted the news as a clear indication of economic recovery, some observers were less optimistic.After two consecutive quarters of decline of the gross national product, the April-to-June quarter's 0.4 percent increase showed a significant expansion of the GNP, which is the total production of goods and services, the Commerce Department said.
NEWS
By EVERETT CARLL LADD | July 2, 1991
Alexis de Tocqueville remarked often in his ''Democracy inAmerica'' on the vigor and energy of the nation's public life outside the sphere of government. He saw that the Americans of the 1830s differed sharply from Europeans in the way they were committed both to a large polity -- an expansive sphere of public engagement and action -- and a small state.Today, of course, the historic American ideal of limited government is being treated rather rudely. For all the talk of Reagan-era cutbacks, the scope of government is expanding steadily.
NEWS
By Robert D. Hershey Jr. and Robert D. Hershey Jr.,New York Times News Service | April 27, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The economy contracted more rapidly in the first three months of the year than it did at the end of 1990, as national output recorded its first consecutive quarters of decline since the recession of 1981-82, the Commerce Department reported yesterday.Most analysts had come to expect in recent weeks that the decline would exceed the fourth quarter's 1.6 percent annual pace, and yesterday's report, which showed a 2.8 percent rate of decline in the January-March period, was not seen as significantly worsening prospects for pulling out of recession.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Frank | March 28, 1991
Nearly three months into the new year, the rottenness of 1990's final quarter is still showing.The latest glimpse came yesterday thanks to the Grant Thornton Index, a rating system used to measure the economic health of 24 metropolitan areas -- 22 of which showed declines during the last three months of 1990.According to the international accounting and management consulting firm, Baltimore and Washington took especially steep hits during the year, plunging more than the nation as a whole and ending at their lowest levels since the close of 1987.
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