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NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,Chicago Tribune | May 16, 2007
I've always been fascinated with gnocchi. The small, round pasta made with potatoes, flour, salt and eggs is hearty, yet delicate at the same time. At least the ideal gnocchi is delicate. Making these dumplinglike morsels requires a sure touch I've never mastered. I haven't given up on making gnocchi but, in the meantime, I turn to the shelf-stable or refrigerator brands from the supermarket. This version, for example, is very fast, and reminiscent of a bacon, lettuce and tomato sandwich, with its flavorings of bacon and tomatoes.
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FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun and By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| June 6, 2013
Riccardo Bosio knows that great food - and great eating habits - start with fresh, whole ingredients. Bosio, the owner of the upscale Italian restaurant Sotto Sopra in Mount Vernon, can often be found in his home kitchen with his wife, Monika, and their daughters Amelia, 3, and Victoria, who will be 2 months old in June. "We cook at home and at the restaurant," says Bosio. "Amelia is always with us cooking. We try to teach her how things are made by hand. " Young Amelia loves healthy ingredients, like fresh pasta, Parmesan cheese and even spinach.
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NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 19, 1999
A few days ago, I taught a cooking class to a group of students who belong to the Amherst College Gourmet Club. Because it was right before the holidays, I chose a menu which I thought they might enjoy making at their own homes during this festive season.For appetizers, there were Italian dumplings called gnocchi. The main course was a ragout of chicken and caramelized onions served with pasta and a mixed greens and cucumber salad. For dessert, we baked a gratin of fall fruits.These young people, all enthusiastic cooks, worked in small groups, selecting a dish and preparing it from start to finish.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2012
A perennial inclusion on lists of old Baltimore dining favorites, the Candle Light Inn is the kind of landmark restaurant that we like knowing is still around, even if we don't go there. Its picturesque appearance and prominent crossroads location on Frederick Road has can create nostalgic memories of romantic dinners even in those who have never dined there. Count me among the uninitiated. When I imagined what dining would be like at the Candle Light Inn, I pictured relish trays, shrimp cocktail and escargots in mushroom caps.
NEWS
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | October 4, 2006
Liberatore's 9712 Groffs Mill Drive, Owings Mills -- 410-356-3100 Hours --11 a.m.-9 p.m. Mondays, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Tuesdays-Thursdays; 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays; 4 p.m.-9 p.m. Sundays Restaurant's estimate --15-20 minutes Ready in --17 minutes These potato gnocchi, $11.50, came in a tasty, well-seasoned marinara sauce. The gnocchi themselves were good, and the light, refreshing sauce made them better. Nothing came on the side.
NEWS
By Dabney Gough and Dabney Gough,The San Francisco Chronicle | January 21, 2007
The best insurance policy on an ambitious meal boils down to two little words: make ahead. A perfect example is Gnocchi with Roquefort Cream, from cookbook author and TV chef Joanne Weir, host of Joanne Weir's Cooking Class. The dish can be assembled and kept in the refrigerator for up to two days before baking. GNOCCHI WITH ROQUEFORT CREAM Serves 8 1 2/3 cups milk 3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter Salt and freshly ground black pepper 1 1/3 cups all-purpose flour 5 to 6 eggs 2 cups heavy cream 6 ounces Roquefort cheese, crumbled 1 cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.
FEATURES
By Dotty Griffith and Dotty Griffith,Universal Press Syndicate | January 1, 1995
Think pasta, and Italy comes to mind.Think rice. Think corn. Do China or Mexico come to mind?Think again -- of Italy.Risotto made from short-grain arborio rice and polenta from coarsely ground cornmeal are as Italian as spaghetti and meatballs.Here's more sage advice: Forget basil and oregano.In the north, where risotto and polenta reign, fresh sage is the favored herb. It's found in the aforementioned second-course dishes and in roasted meats, fowl and fish.Milder than dried, fresh sage's delicate but smoky flavor lends itself to the rich butter, cream and olive oil tones that distinguish much of the food in this region.
FEATURES
By CATHY THOMAS | April 30, 1995
Sometimes Italian dumpling recipes can be problematic. They work perfectly several times, then for some reason, the results are disappointing, even disastrous.Some cooks blame "kitchen gremlins," unknown pranksters who play cruel culinary tricks -- often when the unsuspecting cook is suffering from a case of overconfidence. More likely, these culinary inconsistencies are the result of variations in the ingredients and/or climate. Some recipes are a matter of texture and feel, such as combining just the right amount of flour or water to make a perfect dough.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | February 1, 2009
I'm always surprised that Baltimore County has so many chains and doesn't have more nice local restaurants - the kind that seem to pop up every other week in Baltimore City. If this bothers you, too, you'll be happy that Restaurant Sabor is now open in the Lutherville/Timonium area. You may not know the owner and chef by name; but if you eat out a lot, you've probably tasted Rodolfo ("Roddy") Domacasse's good cooking at Brasserie Tatin, Due or Rudys' 2900 (all three now closed); Linwood's; Gertrude's at the BMA; or Donna's.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2012
A perennial inclusion on lists of old Baltimore dining favorites, the Candle Light Inn is the kind of landmark restaurant that we like knowing is still around, even if we don't go there. Its picturesque appearance and prominent crossroads location on Frederick Road has can create nostalgic memories of romantic dinners even in those who have never dined there. Count me among the uninitiated. When I imagined what dining would be like at the Candle Light Inn, I pictured relish trays, shrimp cocktail and escargots in mushroom caps.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | February 1, 2009
I'm always surprised that Baltimore County has so many chains and doesn't have more nice local restaurants - the kind that seem to pop up every other week in Baltimore City. If this bothers you, too, you'll be happy that Restaurant Sabor is now open in the Lutherville/Timonium area. You may not know the owner and chef by name; but if you eat out a lot, you've probably tasted Rodolfo ("Roddy") Domacasse's good cooking at Brasserie Tatin, Due or Rudys' 2900 (all three now closed); Linwood's; Gertrude's at the BMA; or Donna's.
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,Chicago Tribune | May 16, 2007
I've always been fascinated with gnocchi. The small, round pasta made with potatoes, flour, salt and eggs is hearty, yet delicate at the same time. At least the ideal gnocchi is delicate. Making these dumplinglike morsels requires a sure touch I've never mastered. I haven't given up on making gnocchi but, in the meantime, I turn to the shelf-stable or refrigerator brands from the supermarket. This version, for example, is very fast, and reminiscent of a bacon, lettuce and tomato sandwich, with its flavorings of bacon and tomatoes.
NEWS
By Dabney Gough and Dabney Gough,The San Francisco Chronicle | January 21, 2007
The best insurance policy on an ambitious meal boils down to two little words: make ahead. A perfect example is Gnocchi with Roquefort Cream, from cookbook author and TV chef Joanne Weir, host of Joanne Weir's Cooking Class. The dish can be assembled and kept in the refrigerator for up to two days before baking. GNOCCHI WITH ROQUEFORT CREAM Serves 8 1 2/3 cups milk 3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter Salt and freshly ground black pepper 1 1/3 cups all-purpose flour 5 to 6 eggs 2 cups heavy cream 6 ounces Roquefort cheese, crumbled 1 cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.
NEWS
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | October 4, 2006
Liberatore's 9712 Groffs Mill Drive, Owings Mills -- 410-356-3100 Hours --11 a.m.-9 p.m. Mondays, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Tuesdays-Thursdays; 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays; 4 p.m.-9 p.m. Sundays Restaurant's estimate --15-20 minutes Ready in --17 minutes These potato gnocchi, $11.50, came in a tasty, well-seasoned marinara sauce. The gnocchi themselves were good, and the light, refreshing sauce made them better. Nothing came on the side.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 19, 1999
A few days ago, I taught a cooking class to a group of students who belong to the Amherst College Gourmet Club. Because it was right before the holidays, I chose a menu which I thought they might enjoy making at their own homes during this festive season.For appetizers, there were Italian dumplings called gnocchi. The main course was a ragout of chicken and caramelized onions served with pasta and a mixed greens and cucumber salad. For dessert, we baked a gratin of fall fruits.These young people, all enthusiastic cooks, worked in small groups, selecting a dish and preparing it from start to finish.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1996
A red bell pepper sauce for Laune Collacchi of Baltimore was a request easy to find and easy to enjoy. She wrote that she and her husband had enjoyed the sauce in St. John in the Virgin Islands last summer. "It was on a gnocchi appetizer and was creamy, garlicky and delicious."Her answer came from Dolores C. Morgan of Cumberland who writes that the sauce, "which is almost like mayonnaise, is delicious with fish, chicken and potatoes as well as grilled foods."Morgan's red bell pepper sauce1 thin slice French bread1/4 cup strained fish broth (see note)
FEATURES
By Gerald Etter and Gerald Etter,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 31, 1992
A lot has been written about Marco Polo and pasta, but have you ever stopped to think that if it weren't for Christopher Columbus, the Italians wouldn't have gnocchi?Of course, Columbus didn't find people of the New World eating gnocchi, but the potato -- from which the Italian dumpling is made -- was one of a number of foods indigenous to the Americas. It and the others made their way back to Europe and eventually to other parts of the globe. Many returned, reshaped by other cultures.This great food odyssey of New World ingredients has been interestingly captured by Elisabeth Rozin in "Blue Corn and Chocolate" (Knopf, $23)
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1996
A red bell pepper sauce for Laune Collacchi of Baltimore was a request easy to find and easy to enjoy. She wrote that she and her husband had enjoyed the sauce in St. John in the Virgin Islands last summer. "It was on a gnocchi appetizer and was creamy, garlicky and delicious."Her answer came from Dolores C. Morgan of Cumberland who writes that the sauce, "which is almost like mayonnaise, is delicious with fish, chicken and potatoes as well as grilled foods."Morgan's red bell pepper sauce1 thin slice French bread1/4 cup strained fish broth (see note)
FEATURES
By CATHY THOMAS | April 30, 1995
Sometimes Italian dumpling recipes can be problematic. They work perfectly several times, then for some reason, the results are disappointing, even disastrous.Some cooks blame "kitchen gremlins," unknown pranksters who play cruel culinary tricks -- often when the unsuspecting cook is suffering from a case of overconfidence. More likely, these culinary inconsistencies are the result of variations in the ingredients and/or climate. Some recipes are a matter of texture and feel, such as combining just the right amount of flour or water to make a perfect dough.
FEATURES
By Dotty Griffith and Dotty Griffith,Universal Press Syndicate | January 1, 1995
Think pasta, and Italy comes to mind.Think rice. Think corn. Do China or Mexico come to mind?Think again -- of Italy.Risotto made from short-grain arborio rice and polenta from coarsely ground cornmeal are as Italian as spaghetti and meatballs.Here's more sage advice: Forget basil and oregano.In the north, where risotto and polenta reign, fresh sage is the favored herb. It's found in the aforementioned second-course dishes and in roasted meats, fowl and fish.Milder than dried, fresh sage's delicate but smoky flavor lends itself to the rich butter, cream and olive oil tones that distinguish much of the food in this region.
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