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BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | January 29, 2010
A mazing what a difference a sensible law can make. Two years ago, Congress and President George W. Bush agreed to reduce pollution and America's addiction to overseas oil by requiring automobiles to get better mileage. Now, General Motors is spending $246 million to expand its White Marsh plant and make its own electric motors, giving Baltimore a ride on the auto-technology pace car. Barring an unlikely decision to resurrect GM's auto-assembly plant here , it's hard to imagine better news for regional manufacturing.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2013
Ann K. Crane, who went to the wrong place in Dundalk when applying for a job and ended up staying there anyway for nearly a quarter of a century, died Wednesday from heart failure at Oak Crest Village. She was 93. The daughter of immigrant Lithuanian parents, the former Ann Kwedar was born in Baltimore and raised near the corner of Lombard and Pine streets, where her mother and father owned and operated a grocery store and restaurant. "As a small child, she only spoke Lithuanian, and the kids used to make fun of her in school when she was asked to solve a math problem and gave the answer in Lithuanian," said a niece, Fran Burch of Kill Devil Hill, N.C. "She told of being taught to read English by an African-American woman tenant, reading newspapers in a back room," recalled Ms. Burch.
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NEWS
September 6, 2012
In his letter, William Smith writes that Rep. Paul Ryan lied in his convention speech regarding the GM plant in Janesville, Wisconsin ("No denying Ryan's lying," Sept. 5). The facts are that Mr. Ryan categorized the plant in these exact words, that it was a plant "we were about to lose. " By saying they were about to lose the plant, Mr. Ryan acknowledged that the plant was already scheduled to be shut down when candidate Barack Obama visited it in 2008. Therefore, it is ridiculous to claim that he was making the charge that the plant was closed because of something President Obama didn't do. No, the point of the statement was that candidate Obama visited the plant and said, "I believe that if our government is there to support you … this plant will be here for another hundred years.
NEWS
September 8, 2012
I agree with letter writer Fred Pasek's warning about "vague promises," but this applies to all politicians, Rep. Paul Ryan no less than President Barack Obama ("What Ryan actually said about that GM plant," Sept. 6). Mr. Ryan vaguely promises to preserve Medicare for future generations with schmaltzy references to his mom and grandmother, while his policies clearly eviscerate the program. So much for "vague promises," eh? And anybody who thinks Mr. Ryan was on the up and up with his narrative about the plant closure is surely in denial.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2010
General Motors Corp. announced Wednesday that it will continue to upgrade its Baltimore transmission plant, investing $23.5 million as it positions the facility to become a core part of its electric car business. The money is in addition to $246 million the company announced in January to equip the plant in White Marsh to build electric motors beginning in 2013. Plans are to build a 40,000-square-foot facility next to the site where workers now build transmissions, including some that go into hybrid vehicles.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2012
Workers peered through safety goggles as they fitted together parts of the electric motors they were building on a General Motors assembly line in White Marsh. For now, the parts are made in a factory in Mexico and then shipped to Baltimore County for assembly. But not for long. By the end of the year, motors for cutting-edge electric vehicles will be built from scratch in a sprawling $244 million plant under construction next to GM's factory, now called General Motors Baltimore Operations.
NEWS
By Staff Report | September 9, 1992
The local General Motors minivan plant is scheduled to resume production tomorrow morning, which will make it one of the last factories to recall its workers after a crippling strike in Lordstown, Ohio.Yesterday afternoon, the local plant began notifying about 2,800 workers to report to work with the start of the first shift at 6 tomorrow. Those workers were laid off Aug. 31 after a shortage of parts caused a halt in production at the Baltimore plant.Terry Youngerman, a spokesman for the local plant, said about 75 to 100 skilled workers would return to work later tonight to prepare the factory for an early-morning start-up.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | July 2, 1991
The strike by 3,200 workers at the General Motors Corp.'s Southeast Baltimore minivan assembly plant moved into its second week yesterday with the union reporting only slight progress in talks.Rodney A. Trump, president of Local 239 of the United Auto Workers union, said there was "minuscule progress" at yesterday's short meeting of the union's and company's main negotiating teams."I'd call it a baby step [toward settlement]," he added.It was the second consecutive day in which the union reported progress toward settlement.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | October 13, 1992
The sluggish economy has finally caught up with the Chevrolet Astro and GMC Safari minivans made in Baltimore.The local General Motors Corp. assembly plant notified its workers yesterday that the Broening Highway plant would close for at least a week beginning Nov. 2 because of sluggish sales."
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | August 25, 1994
The General Motors Corp. assembly plant in Baltimore is expected to close tonight, idling more than 3,200 employees and causing disruptions and probable layoffs at dozens of smaller companies that serve the plant.The company has advised local suppliers that it anticipates halting production at the Broening Highway plant sometime during the second shift -- probably between 9 p.m. and 10 p.m. -- because of a shortage of parts unless a strike against GM's Inland Fisher Guide plant in Anderson, Ind., is settled.
NEWS
September 8, 2012
As I expected, the right wing is desperately trying to spin Rep. Paul Ryan's lies into something other than what they are by splitting hairs and implying that what he says isn't what he really means ("Romney and the GOP construct an alternate reality," Sept. 5). But unfortunately for the conservative crowd, Mr. Ryan continues to spew his bald-faced lies faster than they can spin them into fairy dust. Just this past weekend, while the right-wingers were trying desperately to come up with an angle that would make Mr. Ryan's lies about the GM plant in his hometown sound less untrue, Mr. Ryan let this whopper slip out: when asked about his claims regarding the excellent shape he's in, he told an interviewer "I had a two-hour and fifty-something" marathon.
NEWS
September 6, 2012
In his letter, William Smith writes that Rep. Paul Ryan lied in his convention speech regarding the GM plant in Janesville, Wisconsin ("No denying Ryan's lying," Sept. 5). The facts are that Mr. Ryan categorized the plant in these exact words, that it was a plant "we were about to lose. " By saying they were about to lose the plant, Mr. Ryan acknowledged that the plant was already scheduled to be shut down when candidate Barack Obama visited it in 2008. Therefore, it is ridiculous to claim that he was making the charge that the plant was closed because of something President Obama didn't do. No, the point of the statement was that candidate Obama visited the plant and said, "I believe that if our government is there to support you … this plant will be here for another hundred years.
NEWS
September 6, 2012
Rep. Paul Ryan's not a liar as letter writer William Smith would have us believe ("No denying Ryan's lying," Sept. 5). The facts are that before Barack Obama took office, he did say in a 2008 speech in Janesville, Wis. that with government assistance, the GM plant could remain open for another hundred years. The plant officially closed in April, 2009, after President Obama took office. Mr. Smith should have checked the facts before trying to throw an honest Mr. Ryan under the bus. E.B. Brooks, Baltimore
NEWS
September 3, 2012
The GOP is constantly puffing up their vice presidential nominee, Rep. Paul Ryan, as the most honest politician to come along since President Abraham "Honest Abe" Lincoln, claiming that he's not afraid to tell people the hard truth no matter what the consequences. Mr. Ryan made a mockery of those claims in his speech to the convention, however. With his claim that the closing of a GM plant in his home state of Wisconsin was President Barack Obama's fault when the plant closed before Mr. Obama even took office, Mr. Ryan sank to a new low even for Republicans used to characters like Dick Cheney and Richard Nixon.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2012
Workers peered through safety goggles as they fitted together parts of the electric motors they were building on a General Motors assembly line in White Marsh. For now, the parts are made in a factory in Mexico and then shipped to Baltimore County for assembly. But not for long. By the end of the year, motors for cutting-edge electric vehicles will be built from scratch in a sprawling $244 million plant under construction next to GM's factory, now called General Motors Baltimore Operations.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2010
General Motors Corp. announced Wednesday that it will continue to upgrade its Baltimore transmission plant, investing $23.5 million as it positions the facility to become a core part of its electric car business. The money is in addition to $246 million the company announced in January to equip the plant in White Marsh to build electric motors beginning in 2013. Plans are to build a 40,000-square-foot facility next to the site where workers now build transmissions, including some that go into hybrid vehicles.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | September 9, 1992
The local General Motors minivan plant is scheduled to resume production tomorrow morning, which will make it one of the last factories to recall its workers after a crippling strike in Lordstown, Ohio.Yesterday afternoon, the local plant began notifying about 2,800 workers to report to work with the start of the first shift at 6 tomorrow. Those workers were laid off Aug. 31 after a shortage of parts caused a halt in production at the Baltimore plant.Terry Youngerman, a spokesman for the local plant, said about 75 to 100 skilled workers would return to work later tonight to prepare the factory for an early-morning start-up.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and Liz Atwood and John Fairhall and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | April 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Although General Motors says its Baltimore plant is not in imminent danger of being closed, Maryland lawmakers are asking Gov. William Donald Schaefer to form a task force to deal with issues affecting the plant's future.The letter requesting the task force was drafted yesterday by Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, D-Md., and also signed by Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, D-Md., and Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, D-3rd, whose district includes the plant.Schaefer aide Mark L. Wasserman termed the task force request "sensible," adding that it "probably represents the best way to ensure that Maryland is as competitive as possible."
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | January 29, 2010
A mazing what a difference a sensible law can make. Two years ago, Congress and President George W. Bush agreed to reduce pollution and America's addiction to overseas oil by requiring automobiles to get better mileage. Now, General Motors is spending $246 million to expand its White Marsh plant and make its own electric motors, giving Baltimore a ride on the auto-technology pace car. Barring an unlikely decision to resurrect GM's auto-assembly plant here , it's hard to imagine better news for regional manufacturing.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | August 6, 2009
The General Motors transmission plant in White Marsh was one of several plants chosen by the federal government Wednesday to receive part of $2.4 billion in stimulus grants to be used to develop batteries and other parts for electric cars. The plant, along with a GM plant in Wixom, Mich., will share in $105 million to develop a rear-wheel-drive electric system. The grants, which will fund 48 projects, come from the $800 billion economic stimulus bill Congress passed earlier this year to help create jobs and move the country out of the recession.
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