Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGm Officials
IN THE NEWS

Gm Officials

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2003
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. will lead a bipartisan team that includes Mayor Martin O'Malley to Detroit on Monday for talks with General Motors executives about the future of the automaker's endangered Broening Highway plant. Greg Massoni, the governor's press secretary, described the trip yesterday as "a fact-finding mission to see the future of GM in the state of Maryland." Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski and Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, both Democrats, and state Business and Economic Development Secretary Aris Melissaratos will also join the effort to preserve the 68-year-old plant and its 1,100 jobs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2010
General Motors Corp. announced Wednesday that it will continue to upgrade its Baltimore transmission plant, investing $23.5 million as it positions the facility to become a core part of its electric car business. The money is in addition to $246 million the company announced in January to equip the plant in White Marsh to build electric motors beginning in 2013. Plans are to build a 40,000-square-foot facility next to the site where workers now build transmissions, including some that go into hybrid vehicles.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | May 24, 1993
DETROIT -- Just days before resigning from the General Motors Corp., Jose Ignacio Lopez de Arriortua attended top-level GM strategy meetings in Europe and requested copies of all reports and written material presented there, GM executives said over the weekend. Their comments provided the first details about their decision to file a criminal complaint against the former head of the company's global purchasing operation.GM executives say they believe that Mr. Lopez, knowing he was about to resign on March 10 to take a job with Volkswagen AG, planned to take the copies and other important documents with him. GM officials said the documents contained the prices the automaker pays for parts and materials, their specifications and long-range schedules for the introduction of new models in Europe.
NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2005
General Motors' Broening Highway assembly plant, one of the city's last remaining symbols of an industrial lifestyle that dominated the Baltimore economy for generations, will make its final van May 13, company and union officials said yesterday. The plant's 1,100 workers learned of the official closing date yesterday when the assembly line shut down briefly at 7:30 a.m. and a recorded message from plant manager Timothy E. Stansbury was broadcast over television screens throughout the factory.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1999
Maryland officials have stepped up their efforts to retain the General Motors Corp.'s Baltimore assembly plant whose future remains in limbo beyond next year.Richard C. Mike Lewin, secretary of the state Department of Business and Economic Development, met with Thomas J. Davis and Guy D. Briggs, two of the top executives of GM's Truck Group, which has jurisdiction over the van plant in Southeast Baltimore.Lewin said the three-hour session at GM's headquarters in Pontiac, Mich., gave them the chance "to educate GM [officials]
NEWS
By John Fairhall and Liz Atwood and John Fairhall and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | April 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Although General Motors says its Baltimore plant is not in imminent danger of being closed, Maryland lawmakers are asking Gov. William Donald Schaefer to form a task force to deal with issues affecting the plant's future.The letter requesting the task force was drafted yesterday by Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, D-Md., and also signed by Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, D-Md., and Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, D-3rd, whose district includes the plant.Schaefer aide Mark L. Wasserman termed the task force request "sensible," adding that it "probably represents the best way to ensure that Maryland is as competitive as possible."
NEWS
By John Fairhall and Liz Atwood and John Fairhall and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | April 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Although General Motors says its Baltimore plant is not in imminent danger of being closed, Maryland lawmakers are asking Gov. William Donald Schaefer to form a task force to deal with issues affecting the plant's future.The letter requesting the task force was drafted yesterday by Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, D-Md., and also signed by Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, D-Md., and Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, D-3rd, whose district includes the plant.Schaefer aide Mark L. Wasserman termed the task force request "sensible," adding that it "probably represents the best way to ensure that Maryland is as competitive as possible."
NEWS
May 11, 2000
GENERAL MOTORS apparently wants to keep Maryland officials in suspense. After last week's high-level meeting with company bigwigs, state officials still don't know whether the company's 65-year-old Broening Highway assembly plant will be open after September 2003. The future doesn't look rosy. The plant is producing GMC minivans that have not been redesigned in nearly 15 years and will be phased out in 2003. The company is ending the second shift on June 30, laying off about 1,200 workers.
BUSINESS
By John Lippert and Greg Gardner and John Lippert and Greg Gardner,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 24, 1992
DETROIT -- In a nationwide teleconference today, General Motors Corp. Chairman Robert Stempel is expected to open the next traumatic chapter in GM history -- including cost cutting to deal with a $3.5 billion loss for 1991 and plant closings that will spare Michigan's Willow Run assembly plant but could sacrifice a Texas factory.Mr. Stempel also may announce other plant closings and comment on efforts to trim thousands of white-collar jobs, said GM and United Auto Workers officials who asked not to be named.
BUSINESS
By Greg Gardner and Greg Gardner,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 20, 1991
DETROIT -- The bidding wars broke out yesterday as desperate communities scrambled to preserve General Motors Corp. assembly plants that could be shut down.Several cities began looking for incentives to offer GM. One United Auto Workers local considered changes in work rules, fearing its members would lose their jobs if their plant was among the 21 to be closed by 1995.In Arlington, Texas, where a GM assembly plant is battling with its Willow Run sister factory near Ypsilanti, Mich., the City Council held an emergency meeting last night to consider doubling a tax abatement that has saved GM nearly $900,000 over the last two years.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2003
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. will lead a bipartisan team that includes Mayor Martin O'Malley to Detroit on Monday for talks with General Motors executives about the future of the automaker's endangered Broening Highway plant. Greg Massoni, the governor's press secretary, described the trip yesterday as "a fact-finding mission to see the future of GM in the state of Maryland." Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski and Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, both Democrats, and state Business and Economic Development Secretary Aris Melissaratos will also join the effort to preserve the 68-year-old plant and its 1,100 jobs.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2001
WILMINGTON, Del. - The president and chief executive of General Motors Corp. hinted - but stopped short of saying - yesterday that the company's big investment in the Allison Transmission plant in White Marsh is designed to offset the closing of the van assembly plant in Baltimore, "We did make the major investment in the Allison Transmission plant to focus specifically to providing opportunities for a long-standing GM work force" in Baltimore, G....
NEWS
May 11, 2000
GENERAL MOTORS apparently wants to keep Maryland officials in suspense. After last week's high-level meeting with company bigwigs, state officials still don't know whether the company's 65-year-old Broening Highway assembly plant will be open after September 2003. The future doesn't look rosy. The plant is producing GMC minivans that have not been redesigned in nearly 15 years and will be phased out in 2003. The company is ending the second shift on June 30, laying off about 1,200 workers.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1999
Maryland officials have stepped up their efforts to retain the General Motors Corp.'s Baltimore assembly plant whose future remains in limbo beyond next year.Richard C. Mike Lewin, secretary of the state Department of Business and Economic Development, met with Thomas J. Davis and Guy D. Briggs, two of the top executives of GM's Truck Group, which has jurisdiction over the van plant in Southeast Baltimore.Lewin said the three-hour session at GM's headquarters in Pontiac, Mich., gave them the chance "to educate GM [officials]
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff | January 24, 1999
The auto industry faces a bumpy road as its cruises into 1999.New-car sales are expected to gear down. High-profit used cars could be in short supply. Each of the domestic manufacturers has to negotiate a new national contract with the United Auto Workers.On the bright side, at least for new-car buyers: Prices are expected to remain essentially unchanged or fall.In Baltimore, anxiety levels are likely to run high as 3,100 workers at the local General Motors Corp. van assembly plant -- who face a scheduled production slowdown and an undetermined number of layoffs this spring -- await word on whether or not the Broening Highway factory, the city's largest manufacturing employer, will close for good.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 17, 1998
SEATTLE -- Boeing Co. named General Motors Corp.'s Deborah Hopkins as chief financial officer, hiring from an industry that the jet maker hopes to emulate as it modernizes its production lines and overhauls accounting practices.Hopkins, 44, vice president for finance at GM's European unit, will start Dec. 14 and will be the highest-ranking female executive ever at the world's biggest plane maker. Hopkins replaces Boyd Givan, 62, who said in July that he would retire.The appointment of an outsider is rare for Boeing, which is trying to remake production lines in the mold of carmakers like GM.Boeing last year suffered its first annual loss in five decades and has racked up $3 billion in production-related costs since October 1997.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1998
Richard H. Shepherd Jr. learned that he had received one of the highest awards given to small-business people in Maryland last month. But barely a week later, he lost the job that helped him get it.It was days after General Motors Corp. officials warned Shepherd that he might lose his ownership of Columbia Pontiac Buick GMC that a photographer from the federal Small Business Administration went to the dealership on McGaw Road in Columbia to take his picture.That was when Shepherd knew that he had been named the state's Minority Small Business Advocate of the Year for his outstanding business performance and community service.
NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2005
General Motors' Broening Highway assembly plant, one of the city's last remaining symbols of an industrial lifestyle that dominated the Baltimore economy for generations, will make its final van May 13, company and union officials said yesterday. The plant's 1,100 workers learned of the official closing date yesterday when the assembly line shut down briefly at 7:30 a.m. and a recorded message from plant manager Timothy E. Stansbury was broadcast over television screens throughout the factory.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | June 2, 1998
WILMINGTON, Del. -- G. Richard Wagoner Jr., president of General Motors Corp.'s North American Operations, reported some progress yesterday in talks to avoid a strike at a Flint, Mich., sheet metal plant that could halt production at Baltimore's largest manufacturing employer.Speaking to reporters after the company's shareholders meeting here, Wagoner said the company and the union were both trying to prevent a situation similar to the strike at a Dayton, Ohio, brake parts plant in 1996 that idled all of GM's assembly plants in the United States and Canada, and cost the company $900 million.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1998
Richard H. Shepherd Jr. learned that he had received one of the highest awards given to small-business people in Maryland last month. But barely a week later, he lost the job that helped him get it.It was days after General Motors Corp. officials warned Shepherd that he might lose his ownership of Columbia Pontiac Buick GMC that a photographer from the federal Small Business Administration went to the dealership on McGaw Road in Columbia to take his picture.That was when Shepherd knew that he had been named the state's Minority Small Business Advocate of the Year for his outstanding business performance and community service.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.