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By William Blewett | July 9, 2012
The All-Star Game brings more than just a midseason shot of excitement to Major League Baseball. It provides much-needed rest for the players, a four-day respite in a 162-game season that often produces fatigue and injury. The players who most need rest are the starting pitchers, who, paradoxically, get the most rest during the season, playing only every fifth day. Yet, midseason pitching swoons, like the Oriole starters have recently experienced, are not uncommon. Perhaps the best-known case of pitching fatigue to occur around the All-Star break was that of Bob Feller, the Cleveland fireballer who at age 17 struck out 17 batters in his fifth major-league start.
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NEWS
By William Blewett | July 9, 2012
The All-Star Game brings more than just a midseason shot of excitement to Major League Baseball. It provides much-needed rest for the players, a four-day respite in a 162-game season that often produces fatigue and injury. The players who most need rest are the starting pitchers, who, paradoxically, get the most rest during the season, playing only every fifth day. Yet, midseason pitching swoons, like the Oriole starters have recently experienced, are not uncommon. Perhaps the best-known case of pitching fatigue to occur around the All-Star break was that of Bob Feller, the Cleveland fireballer who at age 17 struck out 17 batters in his fifth major-league start.
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FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | July 30, 1991
Q. My roommate claims women athletes can improve their endurance by taking drugs that will change their menstrual cycles. Just how does that work?A. Female athletes may have greater endurance in the last part rTC of their menstrual cycle than in the first. Using that information, a gynecologist can manipulate the periods of a woman who normally has regular cycles by prescribing pills containing progesterone, a female hormone, for 10 days -- 35 days before her athletic event.This procedure will cause the athlete to menstruate a few days after she stops taking the pills.
NEWS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,katherine.dunn@baltsun.com | September 25, 2008
September afternoons on the soccer field at Randallstown High can heat up quickly, and Ousmane Toure tires much more quickly than he usually does. During a break in practice, Toure eagerly pours water over his head and arms to cool off, but he will not drink any. At Oakland Mills, it's heating up, too. Fuad Suleiman, in full pads, goes all-out in hitting drills at football practice. He gradually slows down, eventually taking a knee on the sideline to catch his breath. His buddies tell him to get some water, but he does not. Toure and Suleiman won't drink anything at practice for 30 days as they observe the Ramadan fast.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer/United Feature Syndicate | February 2, 1993
The Last Supper has special meaning to millions of people, but to a marathon runner, the "last supper" means to eat a lot of pasta on the night before running a race.To increase their endurance for strenuous competition, athletes often follow a diet and exercise regimen called carbohydrate loading. But it has not been shown to be any more effective than cutting back on their workouts before a big event.Muscles store sugar, called glycogen, inside their fibers to be used as a fuel for exercise.
NEWS
By Bob Condor and Bob Condor,Chicago Tribune | July 1, 2001
Recreational athletes are accustomed to following the leaders -- elite athletes -- in how they swing a golf club, shoot a basket or run a race. Same goes for any new equipment, clothing or shoes. We see it, we want it, we think our games will be better. The sports nutrition link between top athletes and the rest of us mere mortals is less continuous, sort of like using an older-model cellular telephone on a road with tunnels and viaducts. Sometimes the reception is loud and clear, other times nothing but static.
FEATURES
By Gabe Mirkin, M.D. and Gabe Mirkin, M.D.,United Feature Syndicate | August 10, 1993
Between the 18th and 25th mile of a marathon, runners often "hit the wall." Their legs start to stiffen and hurt, and they find it very difficult to finish the race.The old theory was that a runner "hits the wall" when his leg muscles run out of stored muscle sugar, called glycogen. Muscles store glycogen inside of their cells. During exercise, glycogen is used for energy. When leg muscles run out of their stored glycogen, the muscles hurt and feel stiff.Tim Noakes, a researcher at the University of Cape Town in South Africa, found that bicycle racers do not "hit the wall" when they use up their muscle glycogen.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 23, 1996
I thought cirrhosis of the liver was caused by alcoholism, but a close business associate developed cirrhosis even though he doesn't drink. Why would cirrhosis make it necessary for my friend to stop working at age 46?Cirrhosis is initiated by the death of liver cells with the subsequent build-up of fibrous scar tissue that interferes with the blood flow through the liver.Alcoholism is the most common cause of cirrhosis in the United States, but only 15 percent to 20 percent of chronic alcoholics develop the disorder, and many other causes of liver cell damage can result in cirrhosis.
NEWS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,katherine.dunn@baltsun.com | September 25, 2008
September afternoons on the soccer field at Randallstown High can heat up quickly, and Ousmane Toure tires much more quickly than he usually does. During a break in practice, Toure eagerly pours water over his head and arms to cool off, but he will not drink any. At Oakland Mills, it's heating up, too. Fuad Suleiman, in full pads, goes all-out in hitting drills at football practice. He gradually slows down, eventually taking a knee on the sideline to catch his breath. His buddies tell him to get some water, but he does not. Toure and Suleiman won't drink anything at practice for 30 days as they observe the Ramadan fast.
FEATURES
By Desiree Vivea and Desiree Vivea,Copley News Service | February 19, 1992
Resting safe below the tumultuous surf, nestled among the starfish and pier pilings, dwell sumptuous bivalves just waiting to be harvested.Starting out in infancy no bigger than a pinpoint, "spats," or baby oysters, grow up to become one of the world's most relished species of shellfish. From French Marenne to Blue Point, Chincoteague to Canadian Golden Mantle, oysters by any other name would taste as sweet.Oysters inspire not only the palate but the mind's fancy. Creole legend has it that errant husbands, sidetracked in their wanderings and tardy in returning home for the evening, could placate irate wives with a gift of oysters.
NEWS
By Bob Condor and Bob Condor,Chicago Tribune | July 1, 2001
Recreational athletes are accustomed to following the leaders -- elite athletes -- in how they swing a golf club, shoot a basket or run a race. Same goes for any new equipment, clothing or shoes. We see it, we want it, we think our games will be better. The sports nutrition link between top athletes and the rest of us mere mortals is less continuous, sort of like using an older-model cellular telephone on a road with tunnels and viaducts. Sometimes the reception is loud and clear, other times nothing but static.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 23, 1996
I thought cirrhosis of the liver was caused by alcoholism, but a close business associate developed cirrhosis even though he doesn't drink. Why would cirrhosis make it necessary for my friend to stop working at age 46?Cirrhosis is initiated by the death of liver cells with the subsequent build-up of fibrous scar tissue that interferes with the blood flow through the liver.Alcoholism is the most common cause of cirrhosis in the United States, but only 15 percent to 20 percent of chronic alcoholics develop the disorder, and many other causes of liver cell damage can result in cirrhosis.
FEATURES
By Gabe Mirkin, M.D. and Gabe Mirkin, M.D.,United Feature Syndicate | August 10, 1993
Between the 18th and 25th mile of a marathon, runners often "hit the wall." Their legs start to stiffen and hurt, and they find it very difficult to finish the race.The old theory was that a runner "hits the wall" when his leg muscles run out of stored muscle sugar, called glycogen. Muscles store glycogen inside of their cells. During exercise, glycogen is used for energy. When leg muscles run out of their stored glycogen, the muscles hurt and feel stiff.Tim Noakes, a researcher at the University of Cape Town in South Africa, found that bicycle racers do not "hit the wall" when they use up their muscle glycogen.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer/United Feature Syndicate | February 2, 1993
The Last Supper has special meaning to millions of people, but to a marathon runner, the "last supper" means to eat a lot of pasta on the night before running a race.To increase their endurance for strenuous competition, athletes often follow a diet and exercise regimen called carbohydrate loading. But it has not been shown to be any more effective than cutting back on their workouts before a big event.Muscles store sugar, called glycogen, inside their fibers to be used as a fuel for exercise.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | July 30, 1991
Q. My roommate claims women athletes can improve their endurance by taking drugs that will change their menstrual cycles. Just how does that work?A. Female athletes may have greater endurance in the last part rTC of their menstrual cycle than in the first. Using that information, a gynecologist can manipulate the periods of a woman who normally has regular cycles by prescribing pills containing progesterone, a female hormone, for 10 days -- 35 days before her athletic event.This procedure will cause the athlete to menstruate a few days after she stops taking the pills.
FEATURES
By Alan Sverdlik and Alan Sverdlik,Cox News Service | July 9, 1992
ATLANTA -- In the days before a big race, endurance runners customarily fuel up on pasta, bread, bagels, crackers and English muffins. "Carbs," they say, help them go the distance.Indeed, carbohydrates -- fruits, vegetables, grains, potatoes, rice are the runner's main source of energy during a rigorous workout. The trick comes in manipulating diet and exercise so that the marathoner's energy level peaks at the starting gate.The "carbo-loading" theory, introduced 20 years ago, has recently undergone revision.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer | April 21, 1992
Have you ever had one of those days when your muscles feel heavy, and you're just too tired to work out? Well, don't worry; all athletes feel that way once in a while.Now, the question is will you recover faster by exercising at an easy pace or by taking the day off?All sports training involves putting stress on muscles and then allowing them to recover. Usually, you'll put in a hard workout one day and tone it down a bit until your muscles recover.For example, on a hard day, a marathoner will run short distances very fast, rest and then run very fast again.
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